Party politics and elections

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    The plumage and the bird: We need to reappraise what is ‘essential’ and what ‘superfluous’ in political life

The plumage and the bird: We need to reappraise what is ‘essential’ and what ‘superfluous’ in political life

Political theories have often included frameworks that minimize the importance of some aspects of human flourishing and prioritize others. Rodney Barker takes issue with these distinctions, arguing for the fundamental importance of cultural choices and display in understanding human conduct.

At the end of the eighteenth century, the conservative Edmund Burke denounced the revolutionary regime in France and defended monarchy […]

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    How the third sector can convince people that homelessness can be tackled

How the third sector can convince people that homelessness can be tackled

The first ever large-scale study on public attitudes to homelessness has revealed that public opinion tends to overlook the relationship between homelessness and poverty in favour of a more fatalistic view that blames individual circumstances and poor choices. Lígia Teixeira writes that if we are to end homelessness once and for all, then we need the public’s support. She […]

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    Should MPs be involved in Westminster’s restoration? Yes, according to history

Should MPs be involved in Westminster’s restoration? Yes, according to history

The Palace of Westminster Restoration and Renewal Programme is faced with a fundamental question: how can the Houses of Parliament, a purpose-built building from the mid-nineteenth century, be transformed to meet modern standards? Henrik Schoenefeldt writes that, although requirements have changed, history offers an opportunity to reflect on how politicians were previously involved in the design of Parliament.

‘We shape […]

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    Smile or smirk? Why nonverbal behaviour matters in parliamentary hearings

Smile or smirk? Why nonverbal behaviour matters in parliamentary hearings

When witnesses appear before select committees, Hansard records their words, but not their expressions. Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey analysed nonverbal behaviour in 12 economic policy committee hearings. She argues that gestures, expressions and tone may be pivotal in whether a policymaker’s arguments are accepted.
When political scientists study parliamentary behaviour, the usual focus is on votes, coalitions, floor debates and legislation itself. […]

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    Devolution revolution? Assessing central-local relationships in England’s devolution deals

Devolution revolution? Assessing central-local relationships in England’s devolution deals

Much recent debate has been generated by the priorities of the newly-elected metro-mayors and their implications for the sub-national governance of England. But the broader question is: will they lead to longer-term change in relationships between central and local government? Mark Sandford, Sarah Ayres, and Matthew Flinders argue that, although not radical, England’s devolution deals may contain the seeds […]

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    Until government releases its Brexit analyses, the data available suggests we are better off in the EU

Until government releases its Brexit analyses, the data available suggests we are better off in the EU

The government has refused to publish its sector-by-sector analyses of the impact of Brexit, arguing that releasing them they would undermine its negotiating position. Molly Scott Cato says businesspeople trying to plan for the future have a right to know what the likely effects of leaving the EU will be.

It was, I thought, a fairly reasonable request, for an MEP […]

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    How the Labour vote reflects a values-based realignment of the British electorate

How the Labour vote reflects a values-based realignment of the British electorate

Voters are in the process of seeking comfortable places in a party system still reflecting old divides, writes Paula Surridge. She explains how changes within Labour’s constituency provide further evidence of a re-ordering of British politics, where the old divides of left and right gradually give way to generationally-based divides on social values.

The received wisdom on British electoral politics […]

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    Which party’s statements do Scottish citizens consider as the most reliable – and which the least?

Which party’s statements do Scottish citizens consider as the most reliable – and which the least?

As the terms ‘post-truth politics’, ‘fake news’, and ‘alternative facts’ become increasingly ubiquitous, Graeme Baxter, Rita Marcella, and Agnieszka Walicka present the main results of a study which explored citizens’ perceptions of the reliability of information presented online as ‘facts’ by Scottish political parties.

Back in 2014, during a study of voters’ online information behaviour conducted in the build-up to […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.