Party politics and elections

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    It takes two: Corbyn’s re-election is not enough – more must be done to unite Labour

It takes two: Corbyn’s re-election is not enough – more must be done to unite Labour

Following Jeremy Corbyn’s re-election, there’s a number of things to be done in order for Labour to become a functioning party. This includes Corbyn putting an end to threats of mandatory reselection and revisiting aspects of his agenda to make it more acceptable to the PLP. But it’s not just Corbyn who must give way, explains Eunice Goes. Labour […]

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    How Labour’s internal disputes threaten the functioning of our political system

How Labour’s internal disputes threaten the functioning of our political system

Labour’s infighting might be entertaining the party’s opponents and frustrating its supporters; but it poses a real threat to how Labour functions as a unit, and so to our political system. Andrew Blick and Sean Kippin explain why it is important to appreciate the possible consequences of the actions of conflicting groups within Labour – regardless of what position […]

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    Why there should not be a General Election ‘about the EU’ – and why the UK isn’t a democracy

Why there should not be a General Election ‘about the EU’ – and why the UK isn’t a democracy

There has been much talk about whether a general election will or should take place before 2020, the key arguments behind it being that Theresa May has no mandate to carry out her programme, while also having no mandate to negotiate the exact terms of Brexit. Calling an early election would therefore be a single-topic vote. Yossi Nehushtan explains […]

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    Party cohesion in Parliament: more than discipline and shared preferences alone

Party cohesion in Parliament: more than discipline and shared preferences alone

British political parties are highly cohesive on most divisions in the House of Commons – including on free votes. Christopher D. Raymond and Robert M. Worth explain why party loyalty is therefore independent of party discipline and shared preferences.

While the storied notion of British political parties in the House of Commons as highly disciplined has been challenged in recent […]

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    Unrepresentative democracy and how to fix it: the case for a mixed electoral system

Unrepresentative democracy and how to fix it: the case for a mixed electoral system

The rise of anti-establishment movements and the growing disaffection with politics may be less related to the financial crisis and more to how we elect key decision-makers, explains Matthew Bevington. Looking at the actual level of support for governments across the EU, he makes the case for a mixed electoral system, through which the governments formed would pursue policies […]

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    The future of British social democracy: lessons from Anthony Crosland

The future of British social democracy: lessons from Anthony Crosland

Labour is being torn apart by bitter divisions. The crisis is often attributed to the shortcomings of its leadership, but it actually goes beyond that: it is caused by the absence of a defined ideological mission. Patrick Diamond draws on Anthony Crosland’s “The Future of Socialism” to explain how Labour and the centre-left can make progressive change a reality.

The […]

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    The “power vs. principles” conundrum – or why Labour can’t get a grip

The “power vs. principles” conundrum – or why Labour can’t get a grip

Labour’s future direction is at stake. Its leader has the backing of a large part of the membership yet appears to have no prospect of forming a government in order to deliver upon his vision. Although the trigger was the (tokenistic) addition of Jeremy Corbyn on the ballot paper in 2015, the crisis is caused by more than Corbyn. […]

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    In a divided Britain, the pro-EU movement will have to be clear about what it wants

In a divided Britain, the pro-EU movement will have to be clear about what it wants

The Brexit vote has thrown different conceptions of democracy into sharp relief. Some are horrified at the conduct of the referendum campaign; others see the result as the revealed will of the people. Luke Temple uses tweets from the March for Europe event on the 3rd September to show how these views clash. He concludes that the pro-EU movement needs a clear aim if it’s to make […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.