Party politics and elections

  • money-and-electoral-politics
    Permalink Gallery

    At £13 a vote – a bargain? Donations to the Tories’ 2015 constituency campaigns

At £13 a vote – a bargain? Donations to the Tories’ 2015 constituency campaigns

At the 2015 general election, the Conservative incumbent MP in Watford won 24,400 votes: over the preceding 15 months his campaign received major donations totalling over £312,000 – or nearly £13 per vote. Ron Johnston, Charles Pattie and David Cutts look at these donations within the wider context of Tory fund-raising for their constituency campaigns.

The media made much of […]

  • Andy Burnham
    Permalink Gallery

    The new Labour leadership contest rules are responsible for the lacklustre pre-campaign

The new Labour leadership contest rules are responsible for the lacklustre pre-campaign

The Labour Party is currently in the (long) process of electing its new leader, with the eventual victor likely to fight a 2020 General Election. This is the first election to be fought under the party’s new system, following the recent controversy over trade union involvement with the process. Eunice Goes argues that these new rules are stifling the […]

Labour and the unions: the awkward couple

Labour is in a difficult situation as it looks to elect a new leader. It desperately needs the big, militant unions to back off and not taint their next leader by treating him or her as their puppet. To the unions, on the other hand, it’s vital that they not allow the next Labour leader to ignore their concerns, writes […]

  • Farage on screen
    Permalink Gallery

    UKIP’s future hangs on the strength of its leadership, not its internal democracy

UKIP’s future hangs on the strength of its leadership, not its internal democracy

Nigel Farage has recently come under fire from an influential member from within his own party for his authoritarian style of leadership. But research suggests successful right-wing populist parties often have leaders with strong internal leadership qualities who exercise firm control over the party. In this article, Fabio Wolkenstein looks at examples from across Europe, which may provide lessons for UKIP.

In […]

  • Cameron and Clegg large
    Permalink Gallery

    The coalition effect on the Liberal Democrats: Driven to the edge of Europe

The coalition effect on the Liberal Democrats: Driven to the edge of Europe

Throughout the coalition, a gradual change of the Lib Dems’ approach to the EU in a number of areas can be seen. In this article, Eunice Goes analyses the mistakes the party made and what effect being in a coalition government has had on Nick Clegg’s party.

When the Liberal Democrats joined the coalition government in 2010 they were expected […]

  • Clegg - CC BY UK in Brazil_0
    Permalink Gallery

    The Liberal Democrats in government: Marching towards the sound of gunfire

The Liberal Democrats in government: Marching towards the sound of gunfire

In 2010 many predicted that Britain’s first post-war coalition government would not last to 2015 and that it would be the Liberal Democrats who would break first. Tim Oliver discusses why the party held on despite massive pressure, and what this can tell us about the performance of third parties in coalition government.
In bygone days, commanders were taught that […]

All change in Scotland?

The independence referendum in Scotland played a decisive role in galvanising support for the SNP and leading many Labour voters to abandon ship. In this article, Eric Shaw reflects on Labour’s predicament in Scotland.

Arriving to the leadership a few short months ago, Jim Murphy knew he had a tough fight on his hands to save as many of Labour’s 41 […]

  • Nicola Sturgeon (2)
    Permalink Gallery

    The SNP’s exponential rise is throwing the British system of government into turmoil

The SNP’s exponential rise is throwing the British system of government into turmoil

The 2015 general election looks set to be an exceptionally good one for the SNP, who look set to not only supplant Labour as the largest party north of the border, but to rout it. Sean Swan argues that this could see considerable change in the way British politics is conducted in future, particularly given their possible involvement in any minority or […]

Bad Behavior has blocked 21633 access attempts in the last 7 days.

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.