Public Services and the Welfare State

How to increase affordable housing: six innovative options

The shortage of supply and the unaffordability of homes are key elements of Britain’s housing crisis. Gina Netto draws on research for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation to outline six potential solutions which could increase the supply of affordable housing.

News that in-work poverty is continuing to rise in the UK – and that the high costs of housing are a […]

The end of austerity? Not for the most needy

The Chancellor’s 2016 Autumn Statement spoke of the ‘end of austerity’. It also announced the government’s aim to do more for those who are ‘just about managing’. Amidst all this, one might easily miss the crucial fact that austerity has just dramatically intensified for one particularly vulnerable group of people, write Alice Forbess and Deborah James.

Just before announcing that […]

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    The case for a European minimum income scheme for jobseekers

The case for a European minimum income scheme for jobseekers

On 13 December, the European Commission put forward a proposal to change the way EU citizens can access social benefits in other EU countries. Cecilia Bruzelius and Martin Seeleib-Kaiser argue that the proposal fails to address key weaknesses in the existing system and should be complemented by a European Minimum Income Scheme that is available to all mobile jobseekers.

The […]

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    The Prevent duty: Difficult decisions for teachers in identifying radicalisation and extremism

The Prevent duty: Difficult decisions for teachers in identifying radicalisation and extremism

The ‘Prevent’ strategy is now an important part of UK governement counter-terrorism strategy. But, asks Robert Hindle, does this place undue pressure on teachers in our schools, and encourage bias and prejudice against minority communities?

In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch pronounces that ‘a jury is only as sound as the men that make it up’.  Despite evidence to […]

Whatever happened to anti-social behaviour?

The discourse and legislation around anti-social behaviour has changed considerably since it was first introduced in 1997, but hasn’t gone away. Craig Johnstone looks back over two decades of legislation and asks what it has achieved.

For a decade after 1997 the concept of anti-social behaviour (ASB) – and how its impact on the communities where it was considered prevalent might […]

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    Britain’s ‘radically redundant’ industrial policy will not halt manufacturing decline

Britain’s ‘radically redundant’ industrial policy will not halt manufacturing decline

Reviving British manufacturing through industrial policy has been one of the most consistent themes of economic policy discourses in Britain since the financial crisis. Accordingly, Theresa May made the creation of an industrial strategy a central pillar of her programme for government – yet , as Craig Berry argues, there are few signs that her government will embark on […]

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    Can data-sharing improve public services? Lessons for Parliament

Can data-sharing improve public services? Lessons for Parliament

The Digital Economy Bill, currently passing through Parliament, includes proposals for HMRC information on benefits recipients to be shared with the Department of Energy and Climate Change, in order to identify citizens living in fuel poverty. Sharing data between government departments for policy purposes is not as straightforward, explains Edgar Whitley, and outlines some of the key issues that […]

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    Asylum seekers in Britain: putting the economic ‘pull factor’ in context

Asylum seekers in Britain: putting the economic ‘pull factor’ in context

Asylum seeking is now widely construed as a primarily economic rather than political phenomenon. Lucy Mayblin explores how the ‘pull’ factor of economic migration is exaggerated in the British context, and unpicks some of the myths behind it.

 

Since the early 1990s asylum policy in wealthy states, particularly in Europe, has become increasingly dominated by the concept of the ‘pull factor’. That […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.