Public Services and the Welfare State

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    How the government’s new child maintenance service leaves domestic abuse survivors out in the cold

How the government’s new child maintenance service leaves domestic abuse survivors out in the cold

For parents who cannot reach a ‘family-based’ child maintenance arrangement, the statutory service is the other option. The government has introduced a fee waiver for survivors of domestic abuse who apply to use this service. But although the reform is welcomed, the way it works still leaves many trapped between a dangerous dilemma: get financial support at the risk […]

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    A response to the House of Commons Education Committee report on Multi-Academy Trusts

A response to the House of Commons Education Committee report on Multi-Academy Trusts

The number of schools joining multi-academy trusts has grown over the last five years, and it is expected that this growth will continue. The House of Commons Education Committee has, as a result, looked into the performance and role of these trusts. Steven J Courtney, Ruth McGinity, Steven Jones, Robert Hindle, Stephen M Rayner and Belinda Hughes focus on […]

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    Comprehensive in name only: social selectivity and school places

Comprehensive in name only: social selectivity and school places

England’s top comprehensive schools are often socially selective, writes Carl Cullinane. He outlines the evidence that supports this claim as well as the implications of current policy, and explains what needs to change in order to ensure a fairer admissions process, so that more disadvantaged pupils can access the best schools.

March saw the arrival of the annual National Offer […]

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    Government has quietly published reports on the impact of child maintenance reforms. Here’s what you need to know

Government has quietly published reports on the impact of child maintenance reforms. Here’s what you need to know

With the public focus on Brexit, developments in other policy areas are going under the radar. But there might be another reason why enough publicity has not been given to DWP research on child maintenance reforms – the unfavourable evidence it reveals. Janet Allbeson explains the findings of two quantitative surveys.

Almost exactly five years ago, in the face of […]

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    Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Public, media, and government discussions on welfare are dominated by the notion that the population is divided into those who benefit from the welfare state and those who pay into it, despite the evidence painting a rather different picture. John Hills draws on the revised edition of his book Good Times, Bad Times to explain some of the implications […]

What can Coronation Street tell us about politics?

What can the ‘everyday’ tell us about politics and political ideology? Here, Robert Topinka suggests that soap operas have much to tell us about the importance of the ‘ordinary’ to our understanding of politics.

The study of politics is often the study of war, conflict, terrorism, and statecraft, of the exceptional rather than the everyday. But political identities and ideologies […]

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    Engineering financial distress: transplanting banking techniques to the NHS?

Engineering financial distress: transplanting banking techniques to the NHS?

The NHS is in what appears to be an endless financial crisis. But why has the government been unable to address the problem? Geoff Meeks draws parallels between a model deployed by the banking industry and the way the NHS is financed to explain why the problem may ultimately be a political one.

In a 2013 report, Lawrence Tomlinson, then […]

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    Gamers or victims: how can you ‘play the game’ on benefits if you don’t know the rules?

Gamers or victims: how can you ‘play the game’ on benefits if you don’t know the rules?

Portrayals of welfare users being lazy and work-shy, manipulating the system to receive support, are common. Drawing on research, Jenny McNeill explains the extent to which cynical manipulation is present in the conduct of welfare support recipients.

Media and government are fixated on the pervasiveness of so-called ‘scroungers’: people cheating the benefits system for welfare they are not entitled to, […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.