Public Services and the Welfare State

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    Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Our lives keep on changing – yet the welfare myth of “them” and “us” persists

Public, media, and government discussions on welfare are dominated by the notion that the population is divided into those who benefit from the welfare state and those who pay into it, despite the evidence painting a rather different picture. John Hills draws on the revised edition of his book Good Times, Bad Times to explain some of the implications […]

What can Coronation Street tell us about politics?

What can the ‘everyday’ tell us about politics and political ideology? Here, Robert Topinka suggests that soap operas have much to tell us about the importance of the ‘ordinary’ to our understanding of politics.

The study of politics is often the study of war, conflict, terrorism, and statecraft, of the exceptional rather than the everyday. But political identities and ideologies […]

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    Engineering financial distress: transplanting banking techniques to the NHS?

Engineering financial distress: transplanting banking techniques to the NHS?

The NHS is in what appears to be an endless financial crisis. But why has the government been unable to address the problem? Geoff Meeks draws parallels between a model deployed by the banking industry and the way the NHS is financed to explain why the problem may ultimately be a political one.

In a 2013 report, Lawrence Tomlinson, then […]

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    Gamers or victims: how can you ‘play the game’ on benefits if you don’t know the rules?

Gamers or victims: how can you ‘play the game’ on benefits if you don’t know the rules?

Portrayals of welfare users being lazy and work-shy, manipulating the system to receive support, are common. Drawing on research, Jenny McNeill explains the extent to which cynical manipulation is present in the conduct of welfare support recipients.

Media and government are fixated on the pervasiveness of so-called ‘scroungers’: people cheating the benefits system for welfare they are not entitled to, […]

How to increase affordable housing: six innovative options

The shortage of supply and the unaffordability of homes are key elements of Britain’s housing crisis. Gina Netto draws on research for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation to outline six potential solutions which could increase the supply of affordable housing.

News that in-work poverty is continuing to rise in the UK – and that the high costs of housing are a […]

The end of austerity? Not for the most needy

The Chancellor’s 2016 Autumn Statement spoke of the ‘end of austerity’. It also announced the government’s aim to do more for those who are ‘just about managing’. Amidst all this, one might easily miss the crucial fact that austerity has just dramatically intensified for one particularly vulnerable group of people, write Alice Forbess and Deborah James.

Just before announcing that […]

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    The case for a European minimum income scheme for jobseekers

The case for a European minimum income scheme for jobseekers

On 13 December, the European Commission put forward a proposal to change the way EU citizens can access social benefits in other EU countries. Cecilia Bruzelius and Martin Seeleib-Kaiser argue that the proposal fails to address key weaknesses in the existing system and should be complemented by a European Minimum Income Scheme that is available to all mobile jobseekers.

The […]

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    The Prevent duty: Difficult decisions for teachers in identifying radicalisation and extremism

The Prevent duty: Difficult decisions for teachers in identifying radicalisation and extremism

The ‘Prevent’ strategy is now an important part of UK governement counter-terrorism strategy. But, asks Robert Hindle, does this place undue pressure on teachers in our schools, and encourage bias and prejudice against minority communities?

In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch pronounces that ‘a jury is only as sound as the men that make it up’.  Despite evidence to […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.