Public Services and the Welfare State

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    We ask much of our councillors but do not support them in refreshing local democracy

We ask much of our councillors but do not support them in refreshing local democracy

Much is expected of councillors in governing their areas and in solving multiple and intricate problems. Yet, their powers and responsibilities are increasingly out of step with the work need to undertake. Colin Copus and Rachel Wall draw on their work with councillors to explain the problem and its possible solutions.

Exploring the work of the councillor has been a […]

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    Why UK finance needs radical reform to upgrade the post-Brexit economy – and how it can be done

Why UK finance needs radical reform to upgrade the post-Brexit economy – and how it can be done

Although recent attention has been on the quantity of UK finance post-Brexit, its quality will be every bit as important, writes Alfie Stirling. He explains some of the key problems with the UK’s financial market sector, and offers suggestions on how to improve the flow of capital to businesses most in need of investment, and how to promote long-term investment.

At […]

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    Combining the best of the public and private sectors: the case for Public Service Mutuals

Combining the best of the public and private sectors: the case for Public Service Mutuals

Could Public Service Mutuals fill a gap in the public service market? Andrew Laird writes that, because they look to take the best from the public and private sectors, they empower staff to use their judgement on the one hand, and encourage service users to influence the services they use on the other. He explains how they could be […]

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    From Westminster to Stormont: forty years of failed housing policies

From Westminster to Stormont: forty years of failed housing policies

Public housing has always been financially sustainable – it is political choices over the past forty years that have sought to undermine social tenure, writes Stewart Smyth. He explains how housing policy has evolved in Northern Ireland and makes the case for a new approach.

It was a tragic and unwelcome co-incidence to launch a report about public housing in […]

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    NHS Continuing Healthcare funding: anomalous, irregular, and often baffling

NHS Continuing Healthcare funding: anomalous, irregular, and often baffling

The boundary between health and social care continues to be a major issue, and is especially stark around long-term care and NHS continuing healthcare. Melanie Henwood explores the issues raised by a new report from the National Audit Office and highlights the major anomalies around fully funded care for some people, and means tested social care for others.

The National […]

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    “Why should the people wait any longer?” How Labour built the NHS

“Why should the people wait any longer?” How Labour built the NHS

In the aftermath of the Second World War, Britain showed the world that a universal health care system was possible. Anthony Broxton gives a brief account of Nye Bevan’s vision and how he guided the National Health Service Act through parliament.

On the 5th July 1948, a young girl was admitted to Park Hospital in Manchester, to be treated for a […]

How collaboration can boost productivity in public services

Mainly due to budget cuts over the past seven years, councils have become more efficient in how they work. But a new approach is needed in order to boost productivity and maintain the quality of service. Lucy Terry explains how new forms of collaboration can aid those efforts, and offers some ideas as to how local government can go […]

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    Do we need more counter-terrorism powers? Why Theresa May’s ‘four-point’ plan is redundant

Do we need more counter-terrorism powers? Why Theresa May’s ‘four-point’ plan is redundant

Following the London Bridge attack in June 2017, the Prime Minister announced a four-point plan to tackle terrorism. Simon Hale-Ross questions the validity of this plan, and illustrates how the current counter-terrorism structure in the UK is more than adequate.

Do we need more counter-terrorism powers? The short answer is no, we do not: the Human Rights Act 1998 is […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.