Public Services and the Welfare State

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    The Queen’s speech and the NHS: Is secondary legislation the new primary legislation?

The Queen’s speech and the NHS: Is secondary legislation the new primary legislation?

Seasoned political observers may have been scratching their heads after yesterday’s Queen’s speech and wondering: where are all the big ticket Bills that are going to dominate this parliament? Many expected a majority Government with four years before the next General Election to announce Bills by the bucket load, argues Sally Percy, but this year’s speech left us with a […]

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    Adding £2.3bn of debt to the accounts – social housing deregulation as an early test for the minority Welsh Government

Adding £2.3bn of debt to the accounts – social housing deregulation as an early test for the minority Welsh Government

Before the elections to the Welsh Assembly last week, Steffan Evans outlined how housing might be a key policy area around which bridges could be built in the Senedd. With the results now confirmed, we know Labour will need to work with other parties, but what will be the biggest issues facing the First Minister Carwyn Jones when it […]

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    NHS walk-in centres are popular, but they don’t relieve pressure from A&Es

NHS walk-in centres are popular, but they don’t relieve pressure from A&Es

In 2010 NHS Walk-in Centres were a valued feature of around 200 communities in England, but many of these facilities have since closed or are facing closure. Ted Pinchbeck’s research may go some way to explaining why: less than a fifth of patients attending a centre would otherwise have attended an A&E, meaning the centres do little to relieve […]

Welfare cuts – how framing influences support

Talking about economic reform, Jean-Claude Juncker once remarked: “We all know what to do, we just don’t know how to get re-elected after we’ve done it”. That politicians get punished for welfare cutbacks used to be a truism in politics and academia. A couple of years later, we are not so sure anymore. Here, Paul Marx and Gijs Schumacher outline how important framing […]

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    Public service ethos: the blending values of public and mutual organisations

Public service ethos: the blending values of public and mutual organisations

The previous Labour and Coalition governments both promoted experimentation in mutual and social enterprise run services, a trend the current government continues. At the same time, complexity in the range of stakeholders and vehicles for public service delivery has led to calls for agencies to share a common public service ethos. John Maddocks and Jan Myers explore the combination of mutual and public to […]

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    Building consensus across the political spectrum: designing solutions to socio-economic insecurity

Building consensus across the political spectrum: designing solutions to socio-economic insecurity

Last year, Michael Orton started a debate on how we can generate solutions to the problem of socio-economic security in the UK. Now, a new report outlines the final ‘5+ Solutions’ produced as part of that conversation. These ideas come from across the political spectrum and represent the building blocks of a common ground in a bid to now bring the […]

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    A ‘Helen Archer’ moment? The abused, the perpetrator and the fall-out from domestic violence

A ‘Helen Archer’ moment? The abused, the perpetrator and the fall-out from domestic violence

The huge interest generated by The Archers domestic abuse story line has raised awareness that behind the closed doors of supposedly nice, middle class families, sexual violence may lurk, and it is not only a phenomenon of the disadvantaged and dispossessed. After putting the storyline into context, Professor Jennifer Brown takes a further look at the profiles of those who abuse and […]

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    Worklessness is not a trait: why blaming and shaming is not a solution

Worklessness is not a trait: why blaming and shaming is not a solution

The recent controversy around the book The Welfare Trait is part of a long-standing debate on whether poverty is caused by structure or behaviour, writes Mireia Borrell-Porta. Here, she offers her own reading of the book and explains why claiming benefits is not simply a question of personality; instead, a number of other factors – including structural economic and […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.