Public Services and the Welfare State

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    Britain’s ‘radically redundant’ industrial policy will not halt manufacturing decline

Britain’s ‘radically redundant’ industrial policy will not halt manufacturing decline

Reviving British manufacturing through industrial policy has been one of the most consistent themes of economic policy discourses in Britain since the financial crisis. Accordingly, Theresa May made the creation of an industrial strategy a central pillar of her programme for government – yet , as Craig Berry argues, there are few signs that her government will embark on […]

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    Can data-sharing improve public services? Lessons for Parliament

Can data-sharing improve public services? Lessons for Parliament

The Digital Economy Bill, currently passing through Parliament, includes proposals for HMRC information on benefits recipients to be shared with the Department of Energy and Climate Change, in order to identify citizens living in fuel poverty. Sharing data between government departments for policy purposes is not as straightforward, explains Edgar Whitley, and outlines some of the key issues that […]

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    Asylum seekers in Britain: putting the economic ‘pull factor’ in context

Asylum seekers in Britain: putting the economic ‘pull factor’ in context

Asylum seeking is now widely construed as a primarily economic rather than political phenomenon. Lucy Mayblin explores how the ‘pull’ factor of economic migration is exaggerated in the British context, and unpicks some of the myths behind it.

 

Since the early 1990s asylum policy in wealthy states, particularly in Europe, has become increasingly dominated by the concept of the ‘pull factor’. That […]

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    Beyond nudging: it’s time for a second generation of behaviourally-informed social policy

Beyond nudging: it’s time for a second generation of behaviourally-informed social policy

Insights from experimental research in the behavioural sciences offer a powerful impetus to reject punitive welfare reform. Katherine Curchin explains that findings from psychology, behavioural economics and behavioural finance concerning decision-making by people experiencing poverty point to the importance of alleviating material hardship by improving the social safety net; trying to remedy the character of individuals through benefit sanctions […]

Whatever happened to compassionate Conservatism?

As with David Cameron before her, Theresa May took office as Prime Minister offering a government for all, rather than for the ‘privileged few’. Hugh Bochel reflects on the fate of ‘compassionate Conservatism’ during the Coalition government, and asks if it provides any clues as to how the May government might address social policy.

 

Both before and following his election as leader, […]

What do we mean by the ‘underclass’?

Recent evidence points to the failure of the ‘troubled families’ programme launched by the Coalition government in 2011, a programme designed to intervene in the lives of the estimated 120,000 most behaviourally anti-social families in England and Wales. As John Macnicol argues, the concept of the ‘underclass’ underpinning this initiative has a long history, and has resurfaced in various […]

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    Book Review: The Right to Buy? Selling Off Public and Social Housing by Alan Murie

Book Review: The Right to Buy? Selling Off Public and Social Housing by Alan Murie

Introduced under the Thatcher government, ‘Right to Buy’ has had a formative effect on housing in the UK for the past 35 years. In The Right to Buy? Selling Off Public and Social Housing, Alan Murie examines the policy’s long-standing and ongoing impact, and considers the implications of its more recent extension. While more explicit political analysis of the […]

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    Ageing in an era of neoliberalism: the impact of extending working lives

Ageing in an era of neoliberalism: the impact of extending working lives

Reforms have abolished mandatory retirement and raised state pension age, all while the government’s pre-occupation with extending private pension provisions lacks critical analysis. These changes have various implications for the UK workforce, explain Jason Powell and Paul Taylor.

Employment in later life has changed dramatically since the formation of the welfare state some seventy years ago. Welfare principles indicative of William […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.