Richard Reid

  • Permalink Gallery

    The House of Lords’ powers on statutory instruments survive

The House of Lords’ powers on statutory instruments survive

In the long age of abortive Lords reforms, Theresa May has installed a new chapter by backing off from her predecessor’s plans to strip the upper House of its power to vote down statutory instruments – the main form of delegated legislation vital to the UK government’s extensive executive powers. Richard Reid argues that the decision reflects upcoming Brexit […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The Conservatives will not ‘suspend’ the House of Lords, but neither will they reform it

The Conservatives will not ‘suspend’ the House of Lords, but neither will they reform it

The government’s plans to cut tax credits might just be threatened with a ‘fatal motion’ in the House of Lords next week. Unnamed ministers have threatened peers in turn with suspension. Richard Reid explains how the Lords can get involved in statutory instruments. He argues that this is another case where peers must walk a fine line between being neither a government ‘lap-dog’ […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Is a British Senate any closer now? Or will the House of Lords still go on and on?

Is a British Senate any closer now? Or will the House of Lords still go on and on?

Labour enters the 2015 election pledged to make creating a British Senate a key part of a new Constitutional Convention. The SNP surge in Scotland gives much greater urgency to the idea, since a new upper House could be one of the most important components for re-binding together a fully federal UK. Richard Reid and Patrick Dunleavy read the runes on a century-old […]