Sarah Childs

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    Women and the 2017 Parliament: scratching, rather than smashing the glass ceiling

Women and the 2017 Parliament: scratching, rather than smashing the glass ceiling

With a record high number of women elected to Parliament, was the 2017 general election something to celebrate? Sarah Childs, Meryl Kenny, and Jessica Smith re-assess the recent result and consider what it means for women’s political representation.

‘Record-breaking’, ‘unprecedented’, ‘historic’ – these were the headlines after the UK’s 2017 General Election. Some of the articles attached to these celebratory […]

The revived debate on abortion is not simply dog whistle politics, but a threat to women’s rights

With the issue of abortion appearing as an increasingly divisive debate, Sarah Childs and Elizabeth Evans hope for a broad coalition coalition of politicians to defend women’s existing abortion rights. Abortion it seems is back on the political agenda, although the Prime Minister has said that the government has no plans to change the law. Yet we have been reminded this last few […]

Cameron’s (and politics’) ‘woman problem’ is not something to be ‘managed’ but to be solved

Rosie Campbell, Sarah Childs and Elizabeth Evans argue that political parties should get serious about solving the problem of under-representation of women in political positions of power. Rather then simply ‘shuffling the pack’, the government should actively aim for gender parity in cabinet. A BBC reporter said during the day of the reshuffle that Cameron had ‘managed’ his woman problem. And in one […]

Quota rules would be more effective than proportional representation in moving towards greater gender equality in the Commons

The UK Parliament is astonishingly poor in terms of female representation with just over 20 per cent women MPs. Rosie Campbell and Sarah Childs argue that while a PR electoral system could help to redress the balance, the single most important factor related to higher levels of women’s representation is the use of quotas. It is a widely held view that the first-past-the-post electoral system disadvantages […]

The Prime Minister’s snubs to female MPs are a symptom of the Conservative party’s failure to ‘feminise’ politics.

Leading up to the May 2010 general election the Conservative Party pledged to deliver policies to benefit women and promote women decision-making in the party itself. Yet the effect of government cuts on women and the continued dominance of males in the party’s inner circle leads Sarah Childs and Paul Webb to question the party’s, and the coalition government’s commitment […]

Reforming when MPs work is not about making their lives easier, but ensuring the most effective balance between constituency and Parliamentary time

With outrage over the parliamentary expenses scandal and public respect for MPs lower than ever, any discussion of MPs working less hours can be spun as yet another example of ‘work-shy’ MPs. But this is not the case argue Sarah Childs and Rosa Malley, who here examine the importance of reforming how MPs’ time is balanced between constituency and Parliamentary […]

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    Are David Cameron’s ‘New Conservatives’ in fact Liberals? Or Red Tories? Or are they something else? Is the ‘Big Society’ an ideal or a fig-leaf for cuts?

Are David Cameron’s ‘New Conservatives’ in fact Liberals? Or Red Tories? Or are they something else? Is the ‘Big Society’ an ideal or a fig-leaf for cuts?

Returned to power by their Liberal Democrat partners, the Conservatives have emerged as the overwhelmingly dominant force inside the coalition government – embarking yet again on what promise to be sweeping efforts to remodel Britain’s welfare state, but apparently bereft of any clear economic strategy. Ahead of the LSE Sociology Department’s upcoming conference on the “New Conservatism”, Andrew Gamble, […]