Sean Kippin

How Democracy Ends by David Runciman

Is democracy in crisis? In How Democracy Ends, David Runciman offers a compelling and convincing account of the state of democracy today, separating clear threats from alarmism in an accessible, well-written and thoughtful book. Sean Kippin recommends this to anyone seeking to understand our current predicament and the future paths for democracy – if any – ahead. 
How Democracy Ends. David Runciman. […]

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    Many Labour MPs have still to unequivocally reject ‘roll-out’ neoliberalism

Many Labour MPs have still to unequivocally reject ‘roll-out’ neoliberalism

Chuka Umunna recently defended the last Labour government against a left-wing critique that its modus operandi was fundamentally neoliberal. Ewan Gibbs and Sean Kippin argue this does not consider the nature of neoliberalism, particularly the distinction between its ‘roll-back’ and ‘roll-out’ variants. They argue that New Labour’s approach was indeed of the latter type.

Chuka Umunna, one of the more […]

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    GE2017 demonstrated the enduring nature of the Labour and Co-operative alliance

GE2017 demonstrated the enduring nature of the Labour and Co-operative alliance

In an election marked by surprising outcomes and division, the Co-operative Party escaped not only unscathed but stronger, and is now the third largest in the House of Commons. In light of the its centenary year, Sean Kippin reviews the party’s history and writes that both the number and the high profile of its MPs are a testament to […]

Comparing Theresa May and Gordon Brown’s premierships

Shortly after Theresa May became Prime Minister, Isabel Hardman wrote in the Spectator how the new PM, focused on distancing herself from her predecessor, could end up following the 2010 fate of Gordon Brown. Sean Kippin and Artemis Photiadou explain how Brown and May’s premierships are marked by their own narrow ministerial worldviews; but unlike Brown, May does not […]

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    The “power vs. principles” conundrum in Labour’s history

The “power vs. principles” conundrum in Labour’s history

Labour’s future direction is at stake. Its leader has the backing of a large part of the membership yet appears to have little prospect of forming a government in order to deliver upon his vision. Although the trigger was the addition of Jeremy Corbyn on the ballot paper in 2015, the crisis is caused by more than Corbyn. Artemis […]

10 key contests to look out for on election night

The General Election is upon us, and voting is under way. The UK isn’t used to consecutive elections where the ultimate result is unclear, and following 2010’s hung parliament, both the Labour and Conservative Parties are hoping to emerge as the largest party. Then the business of attempting to form a government can begin, with smaller parties set to […]

Select committees are becoming increasingly significant but show an enormous gender bias in their choice of witnesses

Select committees are now firmly established as an important part of our democratic architecture, making a bigger impression than ever before since the implementation of the 2010 Wright Committee reforms. But Democratic Audit research shows a staggering gender gap in the witnesses that provide them with oral evidence. While this is reflective of a set of wider societal problems, Democratic […]

The Electoral Commission’s advice to Parliament about the wording of any referendum question on the European Union shows welcome progress in its thinking

On Tuesday, the Electoral Commission published their advice on the question to be put to the public in the event of the proposed 2017 referendum on the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union. Sean Kippin and Richard Berry show how their research echoed several criticisms made by Patrick Dunleavy on this blog earlier this year. Ensuring that the question neutrally makes clear the […]