David Cameron

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    How to make a coalition work: rhetoric lessons from the 2010-15 government

How to make a coalition work: rhetoric lessons from the 2010-15 government

How was it that the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition lasted for a full five-year term? Although the formal and informal machinery of resolving disputes was important, rhetorical strategies also mattered, writes Judi Atkins. She explains how by invoking values, goals, the ‘national interest’ and a common enemy, the Coalition not only endured but appealed to multiple audiences as well.

Following the […]

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    How a prime minister’s leadership style affects their parliament’s role in security decisions

How a prime minister’s leadership style affects their parliament’s role in security decisions

Parliaments sometimes get to influence security policy, but not always. Juliet Kaarbo draws on Leadership Trait Analysis to argue that prime ministerial leadership style is a critical factor in determining the role of parliaments in foreign affairs. She demonstrates the plausibility of this argument by comparing how Turkish and UK prime ministers’ orientations towards parliament influenced key security policies.

The […]

Truth-tellers: creating Britain’s anti-austerity campaign

The UK austerity programme promoted since the financial crisis energised a dynamic assemblage of political forces, aspiring to create a space of oppositional political identification. Sophia Hatzisavvidou writes that, although this anti-austerity campaign failed to rally voters in the last two general elections, we shouldn’t dismiss its impact on the country’s political life.

Although the global financial meltdown of […]

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    ‘Doing God’ according to David Cameron: evangelism and Christian Britain

‘Doing God’ according to David Cameron: evangelism and Christian Britain

Unlike other British Prime Ministers, David Cameron often invoked his personal faith in public, and more than once called Britain a ‘Christian country’. Chris Allen examines why Cameron and the Conservatives’ discourses about ‘doing God’ were not as straightforward as they may at first have seemed.

Since Alistair Campbell notoriously told Tony Blair during an interview with Vanity Fair in […]

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    “All that is solid…”: the destructive tendencies of the Conservative Party

“All that is solid…”: the destructive tendencies of the Conservative Party

Is there a winning future for the Conservatives? Tom Barker and Conor Farrington outline the party’s recent history and find that it has often demonstrated a careless approach to institutions and objectives it has otherwise claimed to champion. For there to be a winning future, the Conservatives must seek to genuinely rebuild, rather than merely pay lip-service to, a One […]

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    How weak governance stopped Labour winning the general election

How weak governance stopped Labour winning the general election

Considering the turnaround in fortunes during and after the 2017 general election, why didn’t Labour win? The answer is to be found both in the Labour party’s governance, and in the whole system of British government, explains Ed Straw.

Given the dire display of their government opponents, some have asked the legitimate question: why did Labour not win? Let’s start […]

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    A disjunctive Prime Minister: assessing David Cameron’s legacy

A disjunctive Prime Minister: assessing David Cameron’s legacy

David Cameron’s political career was cut short by last year’s dramatic Brexit vote. Chris Byrne, Nick Randall and Kevin Theakston look back on his time in office, and how the history books will judge him. 

For David Cameron 2017 will be a year of ‘exciting new challenges’. Chief among these will be joining the after dinner speaking circuit of former prime ministers and […]

Whatever happened to compassionate Conservatism?

As with David Cameron before her, Theresa May took office as Prime Minister offering a government for all, rather than for the ‘privileged few’. Hugh Bochel reflects on the fate of ‘compassionate Conservatism’ during the Coalition government, and asks if it provides any clues as to how the May government might address social policy.

 

Both before and following his election as leader, […]