economy

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    The Contradictions of Capital in the Twenty-First Century: The Piketty Opportunity

The Contradictions of Capital in the Twenty-First Century: The Piketty Opportunity

In The Contradictions of Capital in the Twenty-First Century: The Piketty Opportunity, editors Pat Hudson and Keith Tribe bring together contributors to respond to, and build upon, the possibilities offered by Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century. While George Maier would have welcomed more attention on the broader cultural, political and social facets of inequality beyond an economic […]

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    EU-India trade has tripled since 2000, while UK-India trade is static

EU-India trade has tripled since 2000, while UK-India trade is static

As EU and Indian leaders meet in Delhi, Maria Demertzis and Alexander Roth look at the figures on trade. The UK’s place in the relationship warrants special attention. EU-India trade has more than tripled since 2000, but UK-India trade is largely static. The shift is especially noticeable for EU exports to India, where the UK share has dropped from […]

Marx, Capital and the Madness of Economic Reason

In Marx, Capital and the Madness of Economic Reason, David Harvey provides a new systemisation of Karl Marx’s work in order to uncover, explore and explain the ‘madness of economic reason’ in the twenty-first century. This is an impressively wide-ranging work that draws upon Marx as a toolbox for contending with the crises of capital today, but Joshua Smeltzer is left […]

October 15th, 2017|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
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    A Sharing Economy: How Social Wealth Funds can Reduce Inequality and Help Balance the Books

A Sharing Economy: How Social Wealth Funds can Reduce Inequality and Help Balance the Books

In A Sharing Economy: How Social Wealth Funds can Reduce Inequality and Help Balance the Books, Stewart Lansley offers a timely proposal for a significant shift in the relations between capital, citizens and the state to combat inequality and to ensure a more just distribution of wealth. This is a concise and informative book that will be of interest […]

How bad will Brexit really be for the UK?

Long-term forecasts claiming that leaving the EU with no deal on trade would be economically disastrous undermine the UK’s optimal negotiating strategy, writes Graham Gudgin. He points out significant flaws in such forecasts and shows why the estimates they table cannot be accepted as accurate.

The great majority of the economic forecasts have concluded that Brexit will damage the UK economy. […]

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    Is UK economy really as strong as the government says it is?

Is UK economy really as strong as the government says it is?

The British economic model needs fundamental reform, without which the UK will remain in a particularly weak position – one that is only exacerbated by the challenges of Brexit. Grace Blakeley draws on IPPR’s latest report to explain why, despite the headline figures on employment and growth, the reality is different.

As the UK negotiates to leave the European Union, […]

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    Why Basic Income alone will not be a panacea to social insecurity

Why Basic Income alone will not be a panacea to social insecurity

Neil Warner, Frederick Harry Pitts, and Lorena Lombardozzi explain why a successful implementation of a basic income will require a wider and more radical intervention in the economy.

A great deal of recent commentary and discussion suggests that Universal Basic Income (UBI) is an idea whose time has come. Although hundreds of years old as a proposal, it is probably […]

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    Five important questions the government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

Five important questions the government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

The government’s recent paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how goods trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. However, as Thomas Sampson outlines below, the proposal is incomplete and leaves unanswered five key questions about the UK’s position.

The most welcome aspect of the government’s policy paper on future customs arrangements is its acknowledgement of the desirability of a transition […]