economy

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    Five important questions the government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

Five important questions the government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

The government’s recent paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how goods trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. However, as Thomas Sampson outlines below, the proposal is incomplete and leaves unanswered five key questions about the UK’s position.

The most welcome aspect of the government’s policy paper on future customs arrangements is its acknowledgement of the desirability of a transition […]

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    A new urban economic agenda: how to localise, socialise, and democratise the economy

A new urban economic agenda: how to localise, socialise, and democratise the economy

There are sensible ways through which we can reorganise the UK economy, argues Neil McInroy. He explains how a new urban economic agenda can be implemented and how it can help build a more socially just future.

All things must pass and the dominant urban economic model of the last few years is starting to creak, and a new progressive […]

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    Why UK finance needs radical reform to upgrade the post-Brexit economy – and how it can be done

Why UK finance needs radical reform to upgrade the post-Brexit economy – and how it can be done

Although recent attention has been on the quantity of UK finance post-Brexit, its quality will be every bit as important, writes Alfie Stirling. He explains some of the key problems with the UK’s financial market sector, and offers suggestions on how to improve the flow of capital to businesses most in need of investment, and how to promote long-term investment.

At […]

The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised […]

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    Why the Conservatives may not be the party of sound finances after all

Why the Conservatives may not be the party of sound finances after all

The 2017 Conservative Manifesto promised “a strong economy built on sound public finances”. In this third and final article on the political economy of that manifesto, Abby Innes explains why the Conservative Party has, over its years in government, demonstrated a poor understanding of what free markets actually require.

The Conservative Manifesto promises it will be the party of sound […]

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    The economy and the Conservative manifesto: economic imagination in a time warp

The economy and the Conservative manifesto: economic imagination in a time warp

Abby Innes offers the second in a short series of articles on the political economy of the manifesto. Here she considers how the party’s economic strategy is made up of incompatible ideas and paradoxes.

“A strong economy built on sound public finances, low taxes, better regulation and free trade deals with markets around the world…a new deal for ordinary, […]

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    Post-Brexit Industrial Strategy: a curious complacency hovers over the General Election

Post-Brexit Industrial Strategy: a curious complacency hovers over the General Election

Unlike during the 2015 campaigns, the state of the economy is not at the forefront of this general election. Neither is one of the UK’s biggest economic problems: productivity. Peter Kenway and Dan Corry write that solving this problem should be the primary goal of the institutions responsible for industrial strategy.

Debate about the state of the economy was centre-stage […]

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    Brexiteers hope to rebalance the economy towards exports, but this risks proving a naïve myth

Brexiteers hope to rebalance the economy towards exports, but this risks proving a naïve myth

Nine months after the vote, the UK has triggered Article 50. Michael Ellington and Costas Milas explain why we should expect persistent exchange rate volatility and higher borrowing costs once the formal notification is sent to the EU. In this uncertain environment, the likelihood of rebalancing the economy towards export-oriented sectors may prove to be another pro-Brexit myth.

Theresa May […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.