economy

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    Book Review: The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy by Aaron Perzanowski and Jason Schultz

Book Review: The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy by Aaron Perzanowski and Jason Schultz

How has the digital era changed notions of ownership? In The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy, Aaron Perzanowski and Jason Schultz explore how digital products are typically licensed rather than owned and defend the continued importance of personal property in the digital economy. While Christopher May is somewhat frustrated by the exclusive focus on US law and […]

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    Do economists change the financial system, or does the financial system change economists?

Do economists change the financial system, or does the financial system change economists?

How does received knowledge vis-a-vis our financial system emerge and change? Here, Michael Lee explores how ideas about the economy have come into existence and gained acceptance in contemporary UK and US economic thinking.

Imagine a world where Milton Friedman received more encouragement in art, and less in math as a child. Young Milton might have become an artist instead […]

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    How Article 127 of the EEA Agreement could keep the UK in the single market

How Article 127 of the EEA Agreement could keep the UK in the single market

Much of the discussion around Brexit has focused on when the UK will formally trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty and begin the process for leaving the EU. As Gavin Barrett writes, however, the procedure for leaving the single market is potentially more complex due to the UK’s participation in the European Economic Area, which has its own […]

January 7th, 2017|Brexit, Featured|6 Comments|
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    Why historical perspectives on austerity can mislead if macroeconomic relations are ignored

Why historical perspectives on austerity can mislead if macroeconomic relations are ignored

In a recent article, Christopher Hood and Rozana Himaz put the recent era of austerity into historical perspective. Here, Geoff Tily offers a different analysis of the data, and argues that macroeconomic relations must also be taken into account.

Christopher Hood’s and Rozana Himaz’s retrospective on UK austerity argues that the current ‘period of public spending restraint’ fits into a […]

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    Britain’s ‘radically redundant’ industrial policy will not halt manufacturing decline

Britain’s ‘radically redundant’ industrial policy will not halt manufacturing decline

Reviving British manufacturing through industrial policy has been one of the most consistent themes of economic policy discourses in Britain since the financial crisis. Accordingly, Theresa May made the creation of an industrial strategy a central pillar of her programme for government – yet , as Craig Berry argues, there are few signs that her government will embark on […]

Hard Brexit? Only if it’s free

Lowering immigration was the key motivation behind the Brexit vote, and how to achieve it dominates the current political debate. Drawing on new data, Eric Kaufmann analyses the propsects of support for a hard and a soft Brexit, based on how much Britons would be willing to pay to reduce the number of Europeans entering the UK.

A new survey […]

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    What does ‘decent work’ mean to low-paid workers? Working practices and how to improve them

What does ‘decent work’ mean to low-paid workers? Working practices and how to improve them

When it comes to work, it’s not just the level of pay that matters to employees but the broader quality of employment. Low-paid work, however, is more likely to feature characteristics that make it hard for employees to speak of it as ‘decent work’. Hartwig Pautz and Francis Stuart look at what low-paid workers in Scotland think is most […]

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    The fact that the UK avoided an immediate crisis does not tell us much about the future

The fact that the UK avoided an immediate crisis does not tell us much about the future

Holger Schmieding explains why the initial Brexit shock has subsided fast. First, instead of taking charge, the leading Brexiteers lost the ensuing power struggle within the Conservative party as the mildly pro-EU Theresa May prevailed within just three weeks. Second, May’s calm and slow approach to Brexit issues has fostered the impression that she will seek realistic co-operation rather […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.