elections

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    What determines how much an MP spends on communicating with their constituents?

What determines how much an MP spends on communicating with their constituents?

Why do some MPs invest more in constituency communication than others? Using data from the Communications Allowance between 2007 and 2010, Katrin Auel and Resul Umit identify key incentives that explain this puzzle.

Everyone agrees that parliamentarians should keep in touch with the people they represent: constituents demand more of their representatives’ attention, while parties encourage their members to reach […]

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    Fraud unravels everything: Brexit is voidable and Article 50 can be revoked

Fraud unravels everything: Brexit is voidable and Article 50 can be revoked

The allegations of overspending and corruption surrounding Vote Leave’s campaign are a good enough reason to declare the 2016 referendum void, argues Ewan McGaughey and explains the relevant law. He concludes that the greater a vote’s impact, the greater must be its integrity; but there is a bigger question to consider: whether we want to redo the referendum, until […]

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    Overseas Electors Bill: does government really intend to give expats ‘votes for life’?

Overseas Electors Bill: does government really intend to give expats ‘votes for life’?

Will the Overseas Electors Bill, proposing to give Britons living abroad the right to vote in UK elections for life, make it beyond second reading? Sue Collard puts recent developments in their wider context and explains their potential implications. She argues that if government does indeed mean business, then the issue is far too important to those affected to […]

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    Majoritarianism reinterpreted: why Parliament is more influential than often thought

Majoritarianism reinterpreted: why Parliament is more influential than often thought

Despite Westminster often being seen as lacking the teeth to affect government policy, Felicity Matthews writes that this is not the case. She argues that reforms to shift the balance between government and parliament have served to offset the declining vote basis of government, and have ensured that Westminster remains responsive to a majority of the electorate through the […]

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    Theresa May, Ed Miliband, and the problem of the ‘personalised political’

Theresa May, Ed Miliband, and the problem of the ‘personalised political’

Should political leaders strive to make voters identify with their values and interests? Judi Atkins looks at Ed Miliband and Theresa May’s attempts to this effect, and explains why they failed.

On 13 July 2016 the new Prime Minister, Theresa May, announced her intention to lead a ‘one-nation government’. Her carefully cultivated image of strength and stability provided much-needed reassurance […]

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    How effective is Parliament in controlling UK government and representing citizens?

How effective is Parliament in controlling UK government and representing citizens?

As part of the 2017 Audit of UK Democracy, Artemis Photiadou and Patrick Dunleavy consider how well the House of Commons functions as a legislature. Is Parliament still an effective focus of national debate and close control of the executive? And how well does the Commons function in scrutinising and passing legislation, or monitoring policy implementation?

What does democracy require for the legislature in […]

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    ‘A conservatism that keeps the British dream alive’ – the rhetoric of Theresa May’s conference speech

‘A conservatism that keeps the British dream alive’ – the rhetoric of Theresa May’s conference speech

During her conference speech, Theresa May was subjected to events which were out of her control – a cold, a prankster, and falling letters. But this explanation may mean little to those who were not in the conference chamber, writes Andrew S. Crines. He analyses the speech and concludes that the PM could pay a high price for the […]

Why did the Conservatives lose the 1945 election?

Robert Crowcroft examines how the Conservative party conceptualized the problem of ‘the future’ in the run up to the 1945 election, and explains that their message was bleak, especially compared to that of Labour. He writes that, irrespective of the validity of those assessments, the 1945 contest raises broader questions about what the public is prepared to hear during […]