Gordon Brown

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    Many Labour MPs have still to unequivocally reject ‘roll-out’ neoliberalism

Many Labour MPs have still to unequivocally reject ‘roll-out’ neoliberalism

Chuka Umunna recently defended the last Labour government against a left-wing critique that its modus operandi was fundamentally neoliberal. Ewan Gibbs and Sean Kippin argue this does not consider the nature of neoliberalism, particularly the distinction between its ‘roll-back’ and ‘roll-out’ variants. They argue that New Labour’s approach was indeed of the latter type.

Chuka Umunna, one of the more […]

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    Book Review: Alastair Campbell Diaries, Volume 6: From Blair to Brown, 2005-2007

Book Review: Alastair Campbell Diaries, Volume 6: From Blair to Brown, 2005-2007

In the sixth volume of his published diaries, From Blair to Brown, 2005-2007, Alastair Campbell outlines the difficult transition in the Labour party leadership after the party won its historic third term while also documenting his own attempt to build a life outside of government through forays into public speaking, television and the sporting world. While Campbell’s insights into this […]

December 24th, 2017|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
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    How weak governance stopped Labour winning the general election

How weak governance stopped Labour winning the general election

Considering the turnaround in fortunes during and after the 2017 general election, why didn’t Labour win? The answer is to be found both in the Labour party’s governance, and in the whole system of British government, explains Ed Straw.

Given the dire display of their government opponents, some have asked the legitimate question: why did Labour not win? Let’s start […]

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    “Brexit chaos proves that I was right all along,” says everyone. Our political narratives need to change, or they’ll become barriers to thought

“Brexit chaos proves that I was right all along,” says everyone. Our political narratives need to change, or they’ll become barriers to thought

In times of uncertainty, politics is about choosing between competing narratives. The trouble is that narratives tend to be more about sticking to one’s position than responding to events. We need our politicians to be better at changing their stories and their minds, argues Kate Alexander Shaw.

In the week since the Brexit referendum there has been plenty of hand-wringing […]

How do we decide what is in the national interest?

David Cameron recently described Jeremy Corbyn’s support for nuclear disarmament as a threat to national security. During his premiership, Gordon Brown argued for sweeping reforms to tackle global challenges such as climate change, poverty and the failing banking system, all in the name of ‘the national interest’. But how should we evaluate such political rhetoric? Adam Humphreys highlights the distinction between reformist and conservative reasoning in deciding what […]

The road not taken and the ‘bad faith’ thesis: Why a Liberal Democrat-Labour coalition never happened in May 2010

Many have suggested it was the LibDem lack of good faith which scuppered a deal between the party and Labour in 2010 and not the political facts of the day. Bill Jones explores those awkward five days in May and argues that there were more compelling reasons for the LibDems to take the road they took.  The publication last year of Andrew Adonis’s […]

Lib Dems killing a Tory majority, liberalising immigration for growth and the wider implications of the Breivik verdict: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

Alex Hern at the New Statesman discusses the contention that liberalising immigration would double the world’s income overnight.

Simon Wren Lewis picks apart the facts and spin about fiscal policy and spending profligacy under Gordon Brown.

Jennifer Welsh at Politics in Spires argues that the UK government is in a Catch 22 situation with respect to Julian Assange.

Kiran Stacey at the FT’s Westminster Blog notes that a […]