The road not taken and the ‘bad faith’ thesis: Why a Liberal Democrat-Labour coalition never happened in May 2010

Many have suggested it was the LibDem lack of good faith which scuppered a deal between the party and Labour in 2010 and not the political facts of the day. Bill Jones explores those awkward five days in May and argues that there were more compelling reasons for the LibDems to take the road they took.  The publication last year of Andrew Adonis’s […]

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Lib Dems killing a Tory majority, liberalising immigration for growth and the wider implications of the Breivik verdict: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

Alex Hern at the New Statesman discusses the contention that liberalising immigration would double the world’s income overnight.

Simon Wren Lewis picks apart the facts and spin about fiscal policy and spending profligacy under Gordon Brown.

Jennifer Welsh at Politics in Spires argues that the UK government is in a Catch 22 situation with respect to Julian Assange.

Kiran Stacey at the FT’s Westminster Blog notes that a […]

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Book Review: Britain’s Second Labour Government, 1929-31: a reappraisal

This book is a timely collection of essays on Labour’s second period in office during the international financial crisis of 1929-1931. Contributions by leading historians and younger academics bring fresh perspectives to Labour’s domestic problems, electoral and party matters, relations with the Soviet Union and ideological questions. Many of the chapters offer a valuable and fresh perspective on the period, but […]

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Debating academic rigour, hunting the dude, and hurling abuse at Gordon Brown: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

Chris Dillow at Stumbling and Mumbling wonders what’s the use of academic rigour when empirical evidence is routinely ignored in policy making.

Damian McBride recalls the day five years ago that Gordon Brown became Prime Minister – and had abuse hurled at him by his closest aides…

Richard Murphy on the Ripped-off Britons blog argues that good capitalism is good business, and provides some tips on […]

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The role of special advisers should be clarified and there must be more transparency about their work

The seemingly nebulous and underhand role of special advisers has featured prominently in many of the government’s recent scandals – most recently in the case of Adam Smith and the handling of the Newscorps bid for BSkyB. Martin Smith argues that the problem is not their existence per se, but a lack of clarity about what they do and transparency about how […]

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Brown at Leveson: the politicisation of the press

Charlie Beckett discusses former Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s appearance at the Leveson inquiry and points out that politicians are no more objective that the journalists that report on them.  This article first appeared on LSE’s Polis blog Reaction to Gordon Brown’s appearance at the Leveson inquiry has mainly consisted of political journalists expressing shock at his high moral tone and […]

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David Cameron, Barack Obama and The US-UK ‘Special Relationship’

With David Cameron currently in Washington, John Dumbrell reviews the recent history of US-UK relations. The special relationship has clearly not been so stellar in recent times. With American foreign policy pivoting towards the Asia-Pacific region and US irritation with European contributions to NATO, Cameron will need to be very persuasive to resurrect the possibility of London acting as an ‘Atlantic […]

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Book Review: Outside In by Peter Hain

Former anti-apartheid leader turned Labour cabinet minister Peter Hain reflects on his early campaigning days, being prosecuted in two political trials and his role in negotiating the historic 2007 settlement in Northern Ireland. Carl Packman finds it a remarkably honest and modest account, concluding that Hain proves to be a politician of true principal. Outside In. Peter Hain. Biteback Publishing. January 2012. […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.