government

  • Permalink Gallery

    Three challenges Labour must grapple with before it can deliver a progressive majority

Three challenges Labour must grapple with before it can deliver a progressive majority

Charlie Cadywould writes about the long-term demographic issues that divide Britain and explains how they may impact on the Labour vote as we head into the middle decades of the twenty-first century.

Just a few weeks ago, British progressives were still in a sombre mood about their future. With a landslide for Theresa May an apparent certainty, Labour looking […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The Remainers who now chair select committees will harry the government over Brexit

The Remainers who now chair select committees will harry the government over Brexit

The new cohort of select committee chairs will be scrutinising the work of a weakened government, write Mark Goodwin, Stephen Bates and Marc Geddes. Nine of the 28 are women, reflecting the advantage female MPs enjoy when they stand for committee elections. The current line-up also includes some well-known figures who have clashed with their party leaderships, creating an intriguing […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Could local government govern? Rethinking the role of councillors

Could local government govern? Rethinking the role of councillors

What is the meaning of ‘government’ in local government? Colin Copus writes that, although local government understandably clings to its service provision functions, there is a broader role that councillors could assume, and argues that the concept of public accountability would be key in that role.

We cling to the title local government almost from a romantic attachment to the […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Giving civil society a boost: a progressive path to the ‘shared society’

Giving civil society a boost: a progressive path to the ‘shared society’

Earlier this year, the Prime Minister spoke about her ‘shared society’ vision. But a slogan itself will not shift us closer to a genuinely progressive civil society. Dan Corry and Gerry Stoker set out a programme of reform and explain how it could really change the way British society works.

A decade of austerity has driven cuts to public services […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Setting the policy agenda: the role of economic context, parliamentary majority and party membership

Setting the policy agenda: the role of economic context, parliamentary majority and party membership

There are conflicting beliefs about the influence of parties on policy. Sceptical observers point to broken pledges and competing demands on governments’ legislative time; others decry overt partisanship. Yet, as Shaun Bevan and Zachary Greene argue, parties do draw policies towards their stated goals if they cannot complete their policy mandates.

Studies of partisan influence show that parties rarely pursue policies based […]

We can increasingly see signs that the Coalition is following the same trajectory towards election failure as recent long-serving governments

Andrew Crines uses the degenerative tendencies model as a basis to offer predictions for the general election. This approach holds that if a number of key issues are empirically identifiable within a long-serving government then these will serve as indicators of forthcoming election failure. While these issues are still embryonic within the present administration, it looks increasingly likely that they will go the way of past long-serving governments […]

I disagree that I disagree! There is room for more than one method of evidence in policymaking

Academics should not get ‘bogged down’ in their perceptions of what methods of research government values. Kirsty Newman explains that when it comes to decision making in government, there is no universal preference for one form of research evidence over another. This article first appeared on the LSE’s Impact of Social Sciences blog I have been meaning for some time to write a response […]

November 10th, 2012|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Invest in brains, not buildings, to raise scientific output and impact

Which is more valuable to the creation of scientific knowledge, high quality scientists or first-class facilities? Fabian Waldinger looks at the dramatic effects of the Nazi expulsion of Jewish scientists and the Allied bombing of university buildings and discovers that brains had more impact than buildings. This article first appeared on the LSE Impact of Social Science blog At the moment, […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.