We can increasingly see signs that the Coalition is following the same trajectory towards election failure as recent long-serving governments

Andrew Crines uses the degenerative tendencies model as a basis to offer predictions for the general election. This approach holds that if a number of key issues are empirically identifiable within a long-serving government then these will serve as indicators of forthcoming election failure. While these issues are still embryonic within the present administration, it looks increasingly likely that they will go the way of past long-serving governments […]

I disagree that I disagree! There is room for more than one method of evidence in policymaking

Academics should not get ‘bogged down’ in their perceptions of what methods of research government values. Kirsty Newman explains that when it comes to decision making in government, there is no universal preference for one form of research evidence over another. This article first appeared on the LSE’s Impact of Social Sciences blog I have been meaning for some time to write a response […]

November 10th, 2012|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Invest in brains, not buildings, to raise scientific output and impact

Which is more valuable to the creation of scientific knowledge, high quality scientists or first-class facilities? Fabian Waldinger looks at the dramatic effects of the Nazi expulsion of Jewish scientists and the Allied bombing of university buildings and discovers that brains had more impact than buildings. This article first appeared on the LSE Impact of Social Science blog At the moment, […]

Book Review: Britain’s Second Labour Government, 1929-31: a reappraisal

This book is a timely collection of essays on Labour’s second period in office during the international financial crisis of 1929-1931. Contributions by leading historians and younger academics bring fresh perspectives to Labour’s domestic problems, electoral and party matters, relations with the Soviet Union and ideological questions. Many of the chapters offer a valuable and fresh perspective on the period, but […]

Immigration and identity: An open letter to Labour

The centre-left has been outflanked on issues of immigration and  identity. Labour must connect with the ‘culturally threatened’, writes Matthew Goodwin or risk undermining the public’s trust in the political system even more. Dear Labour, You know the story well. Beginning in the late 1990s, and then fuelled by accessions to the EU, a new and unprecedented wave of migration encountered […]

Book Review: The Bank: Inside the Bank of England

The Bank of England is a uniquely powerful, influential and secretive institution, and in this inside account of the Bank, Dan Conaghan draws on interviews with senior Bank staff, shedding new light on the Bank’s role in the financial crisis. With its depth of source material and accessible style, Alastair Hill finds that Conaghan’s recent history of the Bank is timely, informative, and highly […]

Duverger’s Law is a dead parrot. Outside the USA, first-past-the-post voting has no tendency at all to produce two party politics

Political science has very few ‘laws’, perhaps explaining why the discipline has so stubbornly clung onto Maurice Duverger’s famous claim that countries using first-past-the-post voting systems will always have two party politics. It is no exaggeration to say that this proposition still underpins whole fields of research. Yet Patrick Dunleavy explains that modern theory and better evidence now show that […]

Government’s plan to transform the Post Office network must be partnered with improvements in service standards if it is to succeed

During the most recent Post Office closures, 2.7 million people had their say on the service that is vital to them. Andy Burrows argues that a new radical plan to make the post office network more sustainable will only work if significant improvements in service standards, consistency and reliability are pushed through simultaneously. Twenty million consumers still use post offices every […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.