human rights

  • Permalink Gallery

    Automation and the billionaires’ dystopia: how to defend economic democracy

Automation and the billionaires’ dystopia: how to defend economic democracy

The narrative that automation will lead to mass unemployment and thus people should settle for a basic income rather than good jobs needs to be challenged, writes Ewan McGaughey. He explains how the law can help secure fair wages and working conditions for everyone.

Technology today lets us create a paradise on Earth, where scarcity and poverty will be forgotten, but […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Is the government changing its stance towards asylum seekers? Don’t hold your breath

Is the government changing its stance towards asylum seekers? Don’t hold your breath

Olivia Bridge discusses the latest changes in government policy on matters concerning asylum seekers. She argues that far from improving the currently insufficient and controversial system, the government appears to have no desire to step down from its hostile environment policy.

The UK is currently experiencing an unprecedented rise in support for asylum seekers: 47% Britons believe refugees ought to […]

Ending UK involvement in torture: lip service is not enough

The Intelligence and Security Committee recently published its report on British involvement in torture up to 2010 and as part of the ‘war on terror’. Ruth Blakeley and Sam Raphael comment on the report, and explain how the government must respond in order to comply with its human rights obligations.

The long-delayed reports of the UK Parliament’s Intelligence and Security […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The Supreme Court’s decision on Northern Ireland’s abortion law – what now?

The Supreme Court’s decision on Northern Ireland’s abortion law – what now?

Kathryn McNeilly, Fiona Bloomer, and Claire Pierson explain the background and implications of the recent ruling which, although found Northern Ireland’s abortion law to be incompatible with human rights law, dismissed the case on technical grounds.

In recent weeks abortion has been a highly topical issue in Ireland, north and south. Following the referendum decision in the Republic of Ireland […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    UK influence after Brexit: the Commonwealth should be seen as a network, not as an excuse

UK influence after Brexit: the Commonwealth should be seen as a network, not as an excuse

Portraying the Commonwealth as a group of trading partners who share similar values and that will bolster the UK’s influence and prosperity after Brexit is at best delusional, writes Fred Carver. He argues that while the Commonwealth can be used as a diplomatic network in certain cases, it should not be used as a catch-all excuse for trade […]

April 14th, 2018|Brexit, Featured|6 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Critical actors and abortion law: a group of individuals in Northern Irish politics obstructs change

Critical actors and abortion law: a group of individuals in Northern Irish politics obstructs change

There are various reasons why progress on legal abortion in Northern Ireland has been blocked over the years. Key among them is that individual politicians rule out any suggestion of change, writes Jennifer Thomson. She argues that more attention should be given to the actions of individual actors, considering their role can often be as important as that of […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Should the law facilitate the removal of the children of terrorists and extremists from their care?

Should the law facilitate the removal of the children of terrorists and extremists from their care?

In light of the recent debate in the media about whether the children of those convicted of terrorist offences should be removed from their care, Fatima Ahdash draws on case law to explain why this is both a difficult and dangerous issue for family courts.

Mark Rowley, Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police and head of Counter-Terrorism policing recently called […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Universal Declaration of Human Rights at 70: our government might not organise a party, but the rest of us should

Universal Declaration of Human Rights at 70: our government might not organise a party, but the rest of us should

The worldview that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights promotes is the polar opposite of the one actually gaining traction today, writes Francesca Klug. She argues that the Declaration was written for a precise moment like now, when lessons learnt from genocide and war are replaced by national pride and international indifference.

When the state chooses to remember some significant […]