immigration

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    Overseas Electors Bill: does government really intend to give expats ‘votes for life’?

Overseas Electors Bill: does government really intend to give expats ‘votes for life’?

Will the Overseas Electors Bill, proposing to give Britons living abroad the right to vote in UK elections for life, make it beyond second reading? Sue Collard puts recent developments in their wider context and explains their potential implications. She argues that if government does indeed mean business, then the issue is far too important to those affected to […]

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    Why culture is more important than skills: understanding British public opinion on immigration

Why culture is more important than skills: understanding British public opinion on immigration

Opposition to immigration is largely cultural and psychological, and policy will have to address this, writes Eric Kaufmann. He provides recent survey evidence that backs his argument, and explains why current policy-making seems to be based on the wrong assumptions.

The report of the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee Immigration Policy: basis for building consensus was released in January. […]

Lost between the lines: the life and death of multiculturalism in Britain

Karolina Czerska-Shaw reassesses the overarching strategies that have developed over the last 50 years in relation to the integration of immigrants in Britain. She explains how the country has come to adopt a more civic integration approach over the last decade, in the form of a citizenship and language test. 

The impact of immigration has, for long, been at the […]

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    Winning back votes from the far right: does the centre right’s focus on immigration pay off?

Winning back votes from the far right: does the centre right’s focus on immigration pay off?

With the rise of far-right parties in Europe during the 2000s, some centre-right parties spotted an opportunity to win back votes by pivoting towards immigration. James F Downes and Matthew Loveless find that they were more successful if they were out of government at the time. Incumbent centre-right parties, on the other hand, struggled to cut through on the issue.

What has driven the […]

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    Europe’s ageing societies require immigration to survive – and that means anti-immigration politics is here to stay

Europe’s ageing societies require immigration to survive – and that means anti-immigration politics is here to stay

Opposition to immigration is typically cited as one of the key factors behind Brexit and the growth of new populist parties across Europe. Nate Breznau writes that, with many European countries requiring immigration to compensate for ageing populations, the future is likely to see both a significant increase in immigration and a further rise in the salience of anti-immigration […]

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    New Labour’s ‘greatest’ legacy? Why the Left can’t square the circle on immigration

New Labour’s ‘greatest’ legacy? Why the Left can’t square the circle on immigration

Brexit has made a coherent position on immigration urgent for Britain’s political parties, but Labour’s inability to reach one is not new. Erica Consterdine explains how Tony Blair’s belief in the benefits of globalisation turned Britain into a ‘migration state’. This decision, however, was costly for the party, which is now having a hard time satisfying its electoral base, which […]

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    Modern slave or illegal worker? The haze around modern slavery and its implications

Modern slave or illegal worker? The haze around modern slavery and its implications

The Modern Slavery Act 2015 has been far from a solution to the problem of worker exploitation. Candice Morgan explains how the Act is flawed in its application, and why much of the ineffectiveness comes down to how ‘modern slavery’ is being represented.

When you hear the term ‘modern slavery’, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Sex-workers? Domestic […]

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    How Parliament’s failure to clearly articulate immigration policy forces judges to take control

How Parliament’s failure to clearly articulate immigration policy forces judges to take control

Why does the government get defeated so often in immigration cases? Matt Williams explains that the language used in relevant legislation has been increasingly unclear, leaving it up to judges to debate the meaning and intention of policy.

Political scientists struggle to explain (and predict) how judges decide cases. This task is no more pressing than with regard to the […]