justice

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    Justice or peace? (Not) Dealing with the past in Northern Ireland

Justice or peace? (Not) Dealing with the past in Northern Ireland

Both the recent political impasse and the possible impact of Brexit on the peace process have highlighted how Northern Ireland deals, or doesn’t, with its past. Eamonn O’Kane writes that little progress been made on this front, something that undermines the task of governing the present. He argues it is time to decouple some of the issues and adopt […]

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    Solidarity that cuts across racial and gender lines: reflections upon the Grunwick strike

Solidarity that cuts across racial and gender lines: reflections upon the Grunwick strike

Looking back at the Grunwick strike of 1976-78, Wayne Medford explains how ideas of solidarity and common good brought together a diverse group of people to support the rights of the striking workers, the majority of them immigrants. Forty years on and a time when intolerance is rising, the memories of Grunwick are vital.

I attended an anti-racism conference in […]

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    Brexit ruling: a victory for parliament, but turbulent times ahead

Brexit ruling: a victory for parliament, but turbulent times ahead

On 3 November, the Divisional Court upheld a legal challenge brought against the government by Gina Miller and others, and ruled that the government cannot use the royal prerogative to trigger Article 50 EU Treaty, and so leave the EU, without reference to Parliament. The Court’s judgment means that the process must be subject to full parliamentary control and […]

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    Vulnerable children, not offenders: breaking the poverty-crime cycle requires a different way of thinking

Vulnerable children, not offenders: breaking the poverty-crime cycle requires a different way of thinking

Over the last two decades, the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime has followed around 4,300 young people transitioning from childhood to adulthood. Using this, and other administrative data, Lesley McAra and Susan McVie argue that systems of youth and adult justice, far from tackling violence and lifting young people out of poverty, serve instead to entrench them […]

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    The cuts to legal aid are obstructing the right to a fair trial and preventing the administration of justice

The cuts to legal aid are obstructing the right to a fair trial and preventing the administration of justice

In an astounding blow to the government’s decision to drastically cut access to legally-aided counsel, a judge yesterday ordered a stay (rather than an adjournment) to a complex fraud case as the defendants could find no lawyers to take the case. This decision was rooted in the right to a fair trial and may have significant implications for future […]

By altering workplace power relationships and employers’ incentives, minimum wage laws help ensure social equality

Egalitarian liberals have long been sceptical about a minimum wage, arguing that taxation and transfer programs are better at ensuring distributive justice. But even if we accept the claim that the minimum wage increases unemployment, there are grounds for the minimum wage on the basis of justice. Brishen Rogers argues that it helps reduce work-based class and status divisions. Labour markets and the […]

Legal aid changes would mean the denial of choice and effective representation to all those accused of crimes except the well-off

The government’s proposed changes to legal aid have caused outrage amongst judges, the government’s own lawyers and the whole legal profession. Conor Gearty argues that if all this were to go through, access to justice would return to being the mirage it once was for all but the very wealthy before the establishment of legal aid by the post war […]

Libel cases should be settled on their merits, and not according to the size of litigants’ bank accounts

Libel laws are not perfect but they do give people rights. Helen Anthony argues that the current High Court process for libel cases has an alarming effect on free speech. Alternative methods of dispute recommendations and the introduction of a cost-cap could offer greater access to justice in defamation cases. Two organisations committed to freedom of expression, English PEN and […]

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This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.