Austerity’s assault on the public sector has had tremendous impact on managers’ physical and psychological wellbeing

Austerity policies have meant many job losses and organisational change in the public sector. Les Worrall has conducted research that examines how radical and sustained organisational change, in both the public and private sector, impacts managers’ physical and psychological health. Managers in the public sector were found to have been far more adversely affected by a period of relentless change relative to […]

Five minutes with Mariana Mazzucato: “We have socialised the risk of innovation but privatised the rewards”

The public sector is often seen as sclerotic and conservative in contrast with a dynamic and innovative private sector. This assumption lies at the basis of much of the outsourcing of public services to the private sector. In this interview and her new book, Mariana Mazzucato argues against this assessment and in favour of state-led innovation and economic growth. She […]

Book Review: Exits, Voices and Social Investment: Citizens’ Reaction to Public Services

Over fifty years ago, Albert Hirschman argued that dissatisfied consumers could either voice complaint or exit when they were dissatisfied with goods or services. Loyal consumers would voice rather than exit. Hirschman argued that making exit easier from publicly provided services, such as health or education, would reduce voice, taking the richest and most articulate away and this would lead […]

Book Review: Collaborative Governance: Private Roles for Public Goals in Turbulent Times, by John D. Donahue and Richard J. Zeckhauser

Collaborative partnerships between the public and private sectors are essential if the global economy is to stay afloat, argue John Donahue and Richard Zeckhauser in this new book on how to achieve public goals more effectively. Bringing their important lessons to life through a variety of interesting case studies, Sasha Jesperson finds that the authors provide a must-read for anyone involved in the future of public […]

Book Review: The Ombudsman Enterprise and Administrative Justice

Buck, Kirkham and Thompson provide a rich, detailed picture of the current state of the ombudsmen enterprise in the UK public sector finds Jane Tinkler.   The Ombudsman Enterprise and Administrative Justice. Trevor Buck, Richard Kirkham, and Brian Thompson. Ashgate. December 2010. Ombudsmen have been features of public sector life in the UK for many decades now. In this book, Buck, Kirkham and Thompson look […]

Front-line workers in local government are no longer ‘street level bureaucrats’ but instead act as ‘civic entrepreneurs’ to make order out of chaos for their communities.

In the 1970’s academic Michael Lipsky coined the term ‘street level bureaucracy’ to describe how front-line workers in the public sector form a vital part of the policy-making community. Catherine Durose shows how contemporary notions of civic entrepreneurship have evolved in the UK, providing a source for innovation in local governance by tapping into the flexibility and relationship-building skills of […]

Osborne’s out of touch, Clarkson’s out of order and the British embassy in Iran is under siege: round up of political blogs for 26 November – 2 December

Avery Hancock, Danielle Moran, and Amy Mollett take a look at the week in political blogging. N30 Strike In the lead up to the public sector pensions strike, Liberal Conspiracy refutes the government’s notion that few union members voted for the action. Left Foot Forward notes that Boris Johnson and David Cameron both won elections with less of a turnout. As Michael Gove ramped up anti-strike rhetoric on […]

The right to strike is an important one, but the public and private sectors should be treated equally. Government should ensure that when unions ballot members simultaneously, ballots are counted separately by employers.

Today sees the largest public sector strike since the 1970s. Tim Leunig argues that the ability for public sector employees to strike should be equal to their private sector colleagues – i.e. when unions ballot members simultaneously, these should be calculated separately by employer. He argues that this would lead to fewer strikes and fewer working days lost to strikes. […]

Bad Behavior has blocked 51064 access attempts in the last 7 days.

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.