Prominent coverage given to repatriations does not seem to undermine the public’s willingness to stay the course in military campaigns

James Strong investigates whether the greater prominence given to individual military casualties in recent years made the British public more sceptical about military action in general. He finds that prominent coverage of military casualties causes the public to pay greater attention to military campaigns, but does not necessarily shape public attitudes towards those campaigns. An MoD study from 2012, obtained by The […]

Book Review: Women and Wars

In traditional historical and scholarly accounts of the making and fighting of wars, women are often nowhere to be seen. With few exceptions, war stories are told as if men were the only ones who plan, fight, are injured by, and negotiate ends to wars. As the pages of this book aim to tell, though, those accounts are far from […]

Book Review: Local Peacebuilding and National Peace: Interaction between Grassroots and Elite Processes

This book looks at violent and protracted struggles in which local people from countries like South Africa and Northern Ireland have sought to make their own peace with local combatants. Meike de Goede finds the case studies presented from a wide variety of countries make for a valuable contribution to the study of local peace initiatives. Local Peacebuilding and National Peace: Interaction […]

Book Review: Useful Enemies: When Waging Wars is More Important than Winning Them

There are currently between twenty and thirty civil wars occurring worldwide, while at a global level the Cold War has been succeeded by the War on Terror, which continues to rage a decade after 9/11. When we know how destructive war is in both human and economic terms, why do wars continue for so long? Why do the efforts of aid organizations […]

Book Review: Winston Churchill: The Wilderness Years: Speaking out against Hitler in the Prelude to War

Martin Gilbert’s intimate knowledge of his subject and expert use of source material give us an important insight into the most influential British politician of the twentieth century. Reviewed by Mahon Murphy.   Winston Churchill: The Wilderness Years: Speaking out against Hitler in the Prelude to War. Martin Gilbert. IB Tauris. December 2011. Find this book:  Anyone with even a passing interest in […]

Book Review: Media and Terrorism: Global Perspectives, edited by Des Freedman and Daya Kishan Thussa

Media and Terrorism: Global Perspectives is an insightful addition to the discussion about how we define legitimate and illegitimate targets in war, and what part the media has played in both the public and policy makers ideas about these decisions. Reviewed by Kate Saffin.   Media and Terrorism: Global Perspectives. Edited by Des Freedman and Daya Kishan Thussa. Sage Publications. 336 pages. […]

Book Review: Blair’s Just War: Iraq and the Illusion of Morality, by Peter Lee

When is it right to go to war? Peter Lee argues that Tony Blair’s “illusion of morality” evaporated after the 2003 Iraq invasion because the ideas he relied upon were taken out of their historical context. Dr Matthew Partridge is not convinced by the author’s arguments, and finds that exaggerations make the book into a polemic, rather than a serious academic study.  Blair’s […]

Book Review: The Deaths of Others: The Fate of Civilians in America’s Wars by John Tirman

John Tirman has written a sweeping and critical account of how the US military has treated civilians in its foreign wars and how the American public has countenanced brutality in its name. A far-reaching, ambitious, and provocative book, as reviewed by Avery Hancock.   The Deaths of Others: The Fate of Civilians in America’s Civil Wars. John Tirman. Oxford University Press. July 2011.  […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.