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    Culture and two-way perspective-taking in research on autism

Culture and two-way perspective-taking in research on autism

A new study from Brett Heasman and Alex Gillespie has been published in Autism which highlights an important methodological and theoretical gap in understanding autistic social interactions.

Open Access paper accessible here: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1362361317708287

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people connect and relate to others, and also impacts one’s sensory experience of the world (NAS, 2017b). For […]

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    ‘Space invaders’: Are smartphones really transforming parents and adolescents’ ways of communicating?

‘Space invaders’: Are smartphones really transforming parents and adolescents’ ways of communicating?

This post originally appeared on the ‘Parenting for a digital future’ blog from the Department of Media and Communications.
Marina Everri takes a closer look at the ways in which smartphones impact family life in Italy, and whether they are changing the ways in which parents and adolescents interact. Marina is a Marie Curie Research Fellow at the Department of […]

The psychology of children with same-sex parents

What does it mean to become parents in a stigmatising political and sociocultural context? Marina Everri discusses her thoughts from her new book on same-sex parents and their children living in Italy.

In most Western European and Scandinavian countries, same-sex couples have been allowed to get married and have or adopt children since the beginning of the twenty-first century (see […]

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    Podcast: The relationship between virtual experiences and social behaviour

Podcast: The relationship between virtual experiences and social behaviour

The relationship between virtual experiences and social behaviour has long held the fascination of researchers of social science, with studies exploring extensively its negative (e.g. aggression) and positive (e.g. learning) effects. With the development of the Oculus Rift and mobile technologies such as the Samsung Gear VR, the infrastructure for virtual experiences is becoming increasingly accessible in our daily […]

The psychology of communicating during a crisis

Dustin Eno, an alumni of the MSc in Social and Public Communication, shares his thoughts and experiences about working in the crisis communications industry.

Life is full of unexpected events, where unknowns can rapidly lead to fear, anger, and a need for a target to blame – a way of making sense of what has happened. In most cases, […]

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    ‘We need to speak about race’: Examining the barriers to full and equal participation in university life

‘We need to speak about race’: Examining the barriers to full and equal participation in university life

This blog originally appeared on LSE Impact Blog on 14th April 2016.

Looking to examine and address the barriers facing black and minority ethnic academic staff, the LSE is funding a project entitled ‘Race in the Academy’ investigating why so few black and ethnic minority academics are attracted to the LSE and why it struggles to retain black and ethnic minority […]

What is “personality”?

Dr Jana Uher, Senior Research Fellow and Marie Curie Fellow, LSE

There is hardly anything that is as central to anyone’s life as “personality”. But what is “personality” and why are there so many different definitions? Jana Uher, Senior Research Fellow at LSE, investigated the meta-theories – the “theories behind the theories” – that scientists have developed about “personality”.
What […]

The ‘ripple effect’ of driving behaviour

The Department of Social Psychology has completed a research project for the tyre company Goodyear, working through LSE Enterprise. Dr Chris Tennant discusses what the study revealed about the psychology of ‘ordinary, everyday’ drivers, and how they can get involved in antagonistic interactions with other drivers, (combative driving) and co-operative interactions with other drivers, (considerate driving).
Introduction

When negotiating road space […]

Introspection put back on its feet: New research reveals conceptual leap

Dr Jana Uher, Social Psychology, LSE
j.uher@lse.ac.uk
Perceiving physical stimuli such as light is not the same as perceiving one’s own thoughts and feelings. Introspective findings on the psychophysical laws of stimulus perception therefore cannot prove that all mental life is quantifiable as psychologists have long assume.
Mental life is accessible only by each individual him- or herself and by nobody else. […]

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    How to build an echoborg: PhD researcher Kevin Corti featured on the BBC

How to build an echoborg: PhD researcher Kevin Corti featured on the BBC

Research by Kevin Corti and Alex Gillespie on “echoborgs”, a hybrid social agent consisting of a real person who speaks words determined by a computer program, has been featured on the BBC website.

By Brett Heasman and Kevin Corti

In the race to develop artificial intelligence, echoborgs tell us much about our future relationship with machines, and how their communication can be […]

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This work by Psychology@LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported.