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    ‘Religious minorities are especially vulnerable’: Intersectional identity and international aid

‘Religious minorities are especially vulnerable’: Intersectional identity and international aid

In a call for smarter international development policy, Matthew D. Rees explores how religious identity intersects with other marginalised identities to render religious minorities especially vulnerable around the world.

On 19 February 2018 Boko Haram kidnapped more than 100 girls from a secondary school in the town of Dapchi, southern Yobe State in Nigeria. At the sound of gunshots, one […]

January 15th, 2019|Featured, Latest|0 Comments|

Brexit, Democracy and the Sacred

There is no way back to a United Kingdom without some form of sacrifice, writes Jonathan Rowson. A second referendum in which an option to remain in the EU requires a supermajority could be a step in the right direction.

Why has Brexit led the UK to such an absurd situation? We are told the army is preparing to be […]

January 11th, 2019|Featured, Latest|2 Comments|

What do secularists mean by ‘secularism’?

In a helpful exploration of the term, Jeremy Rodell identifies three core principles of secularism: institutional separation, freedom of belief and no discrimination on grounds of religion. These conditions allow for ‘competing concepts of the good life’ to be pursued in society.

When secularists talk about secularism, they are talking about a political idea, a way of organising a state […]

January 9th, 2019|Featured, Latest|2 Comments|
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    ‘A lived, situated and constantly changing reality’: Why religion is relevant to the pursuit of social progress

‘A lived, situated and constantly changing reality’: Why religion is relevant to the pursuit of social progress

An international panel of social scientists has produced a ground-breaking interdisciplinary report on the need to better understand how social progress can be pursued. As lead authors of the report’s religion chapter, Grace Davie and Nancy Ammerman outline why many assumptions about religion are unhelpful and counter-productive. Instead, the specific cultural situations must be carefully analysed.

Does religion contribute to […]

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    The Religion Gap: Why right-wing populists underperform among Christian voters and what this means for the role of the Church in society

The Religion Gap: Why right-wing populists underperform among Christian voters and what this means for the role of the Church in society

As Tobias Cremer outlines, to understand this regional phenomenon it is essential to focus on specific national contexts. In Bavaria, most voters to have abandoned the Christian democrats moved left to the Greens rather than to the AfD on the right. Tobias explains that, in Germany, the mainstream churches are outspoken in their condemnation of such movements and have […]

Sacred, Supernatural, and Apocalyptic Populism

What explains support for populism when it does not suit one’s economic or political self-interest? Daniel Nilsson DeHanas explores three dimensions of populism that go beyond rational analysis: the sacred, supernatural, and apocalyptic.

Populism is dangerous. If there is anything policy experts, academics, and media tend to agree upon today, it is simply this. Populism is seen as a threat […]

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    There must be space for criticism: Why Sajid Javid’s attack on critics of Prevent is deeply concerning

There must be space for criticism: Why Sajid Javid’s attack on critics of Prevent is deeply concerning

The debate on the UK’s counterextremism strategy Prevent has been extremely polarised for many years and has left some Muslim communities in this country feeling marginalised and alienated. The Home Secretary’s most recent comments associating critics of Prevent with “extremists” have furthered this polarisation. Jennifer Philippa Eggert explains why Javid’s comments are concerning and which course of action the […]

December 14th, 2018|Featured, Latest|2 Comments|
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    The restoration of a ‘lost’ Britain: How nostalgia becomes a dangerous political force

The restoration of a ‘lost’ Britain: How nostalgia becomes a dangerous political force

For many Britons, everything was better in the past. Sophia Gaston writes that this is partly because governments have not always been successful at guiding citizens through times of social and economic change. She examines nostalgia as a political force in Britain and explains why politicians must address, rather than avoid, questions about patriotism and identity.

The study of nostalgia inevitably creates […]

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    Gender Ideology, Religious Fundamentalism and the Electoral Campaign (2017-2018) in Costa Rica

Gender Ideology, Religious Fundamentalism and the Electoral Campaign (2017-2018) in Costa Rica

Costa Rica’s recent general election was marked by fierce debates surrounding ‘gender ideology’ as prominent evangelical Christian candidates opposed to LGBT rights attracted widespread support. Gabriela Arguedas-Ramírez locates the roots of this movement in the context of a country in which neoliberal policies have exacerbated inequality and marginalised human rights.

Neoliberalism, anxiety and gender ideology [1]

The neoliberal economic system has triggered […]

December 6th, 2018|Featured, Latest|0 Comments|
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    The complexity of religious identity and religious unbelief within individual British Hindus

The complexity of religious identity and religious unbelief within individual British Hindus

As part of a study of religious unbelief in oral history archives, the British Library’s Paul Merchant has discovered examples of ‘hybrid configurations’ of unbelief among British Hindus recorded in the BBC’s ‘Millennium Memory Bank’, challenging a simplified believer-unbeliever binary.

At the British Library – accessible through its Listening and Viewing Service – there is a rich, untapped resource for […]

December 3rd, 2018|Featured, Latest|0 Comments|