Emma Glassey

About Emma Glassey

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So far Emma Glassey has created 20 entries.

A sociology of home?

Housing is dominated by economic and political logics, raising fundamental questions about what, and whom, housing is for. But the need for a home is universal. In this post, Tom Brookes considers what a sociology of home could look like. 
Image Credit: (freestocks.org CC0 1.0)
One year ago, I returned to the UK for the first time in eighteen months. In my mind rang […]

  • Permalink The spiral ramp in the centre of the LSE Library in the Lionel Robbins BuildingGallery

    REPOST: Impact is crippling higher education. But it is still part of the solution

REPOST: Impact is crippling higher education. But it is still part of the solution

LSE Impact Blog have kindly allowed Researching Sociology to repost Tina Basi and Mona Sloane’s analysis of the “impact agenda” in universities.

Impact is crippling higher education. But it is still part of the solution

We need to talk about the ‘Anthropocene’

Why is the Anthropocene important? And what does our mass media’s presentation of the Anthropocene tell us? Professor Emeritus Leslie Sklair shares his research.

There is an enormous amount of research on how ‘climate change’ and ‘global warming’ are being reported in the media all over the world. However, since beginning to study the Anthropocene (the geological concept intended to measure and […]

Colourism and Amara La Negra

Student Arianna McCullough draws on the experience of artist Amara La Negra to open up a conversation on colourism in this latest post.
Y de qué color! NEGRO. Y qué lindo suena! NEGRO. Negro Soy!

Me gritaron, Victoria Santa Cruz
If you have any kind of social media account, its highly likely you’ve come across the name Amara La Negra over the past few […]

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    The importance of praxis: class, social mobility and “Sociology as a Martial Art” – Part II

The importance of praxis: class, social mobility and “Sociology as a Martial Art” – Part II

Inspired by the LSE Library’s latest exhibition on Beveridge and the welfare state, student Lucy Smith organised a visit to the LSE for her A-Level teacher and his pupils from Drapers’ Academy, Romford. Their thoughts about the visit, studying sociology and the class system – written in their own words – are detailed in this post. Find out how the visit came about […]

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    The importance of praxis: class, social mobility and “Sociology as a Martial Art” – Part I

The importance of praxis: class, social mobility and “Sociology as a Martial Art” – Part I

Inspired by the LSE Library’s latest exhibition on Beveridge and the welfare state, student Lucy Smith organised a visit to the LSE for her A-Level teacher and his pupils from Drapers’ Academy, Romford. Her post underlines the importance of praxis and reminds “all of us who say ‘sociology’ to actually do sociology”.

Firstly, I’d like to thank Tom Brookes for a fascinating blog post which inspired […]

The Wire as sociology

In this post, Tom Brookes considers ‘The Wire’ as a sociological cultural object in its production, form and content, and consumption.

Ten years ago this month, HBO broadcast the final episode of The Wire (2002-2008). It had not been plain sailing. Since its inception, The Wire had weathered low viewing figures and regular threats of cancellation. However, by its conclusion, and throughout the subsequent […]

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    A Response to Critiques of ‘To the Bone’: why films on anorexia will never do it “right”

A Response to Critiques of ‘To the Bone’: why films on anorexia will never do it “right”

In this piece, Clotilde Du Mesnil De Maricourt considers a number of critiques of the 2017 Netflix production ‘To The Bone’, drawing on her own experience and the dissertation she’s currently writing on eating disorder recovery narratives.

TW: eating disorders

Following mixed responses to Netflix’s new film To the Bone which came out last summer, I decided to make up my own opinion of it. A year […]

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    Representing (Ir)Reverence: what The Crown can tell us about our relationship with the monarchy today

Representing (Ir)Reverence: what The Crown can tell us about our relationship with the monarchy today

In this piece, Anirbaan Banerjee explores the pervasiveness of the British monarchy through the lens of the historical television drama series, The Crown.

One does not need to be facing the imposing façade of the Buckingham Palace to be able to acknowledge the indelible imprint of the monarchy on British society. Homage to the sovereign is omnipresent ­– from city streets to […]

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    Decolonising Social Thought and Contemporary Social Discourse: the diversification and globalisation of sociology

Decolonising Social Thought and Contemporary Social Discourse: the diversification and globalisation of sociology

Do movements dedicated to decolonising sociology need to press further? Ashley Masing explores what a fully decolonised sociology could look like.

In The Communist Manifesto (1848), Marx once wrote that our political, legal, and educational systems were built on the foundations of existing structures which have scaffolded our society — and our colonial past is no exception to such influence. […]