Development

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    If Imran Khan really wants to lower infant mortality in Pakistan, he should look to the Maldives and Sri Lanka for inspiration

If Imran Khan really wants to lower infant mortality in Pakistan, he should look to the Maldives and Sri Lanka for inspiration

Pakistan’s level of infant mortality remains high despite decreasing over recent years. With Imran Khan vowing to review the county’s strategy on protecting mothers and their babies, Abid Rehman argues that the newly elected Prime Minister doesn’t have to look outside the region for ideas to lower it further.
Baby in hospital bed | Credit: Unsplash awpixel
In his maiden speech, Imran […]

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    Book Review: Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Bilion by Anirudh Krishna

Book Review: Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Bilion by Anirudh Krishna

 In Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Billion, Anirudh Krishna offers a ‘worms eye’ view of development, arguing for policy that is attuned to local locations. Whilst gender and state-based differences could be explored further in relation to the problems of development in India, Krishna provides insight into the challenges of contemporary Indian development, Sohini Kar finds. 

Broken Ladder: The Paradox […]

September 10th, 2018|Book Reviews, Development, Featured, Rural Areas, Urban India|Comments Off on Book Review: Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Bilion by Anirudh Krishna|

Combating the learning crisis in South Asia

Amongst a range of development challenges that South Asian countries face is poor education, with only around half of primary aged children receiving education within the minimum learning standards framework. In order to combat this crisis, learning must be placed at the centre of education and students at the centre of learning, write Anushna Jha and Mehrin Shah. 

Amongst a range […]

Can manufacturing change India’s demographic destiny?

Despite India’s substantial youth population, little concerted effort has been made by the government to ensure their accommodation in India’s labour market. Manufacturing could help partially address this, write Shubhranka Mondal and Pratibha Joshi. 

The current status of employment in India

India currently has the world’s largest youth population. The working age group of 15-59 years forms an overwhelmingly large percentage at […]

September 5th, 2018|Development, Economy, Featured, Technology|Comments Off on Can manufacturing change India’s demographic destiny?|

Book Review: Widows of Vidarbha: Making of Shadows

In Widows of Vidarbha: Making of Shadows, Kota Neelima makes an admirable attempt at shedding light on the wives of the farmers who have committed suicide during India’s ongoing agrarian crisis. However, Neelima falls short at portraying the women as productive workers wielding their own agency, instead drawing on a reductivist framework, primarily focusing on their widowhood, Sumedha Pal […]

August 30th, 2018|Agriculture, Book Reviews, Featured, Rural Areas|Comments Off on Book Review: Widows of Vidarbha: Making of Shadows|
  • Permalink Young girls carry pots of water in Shoba Mahar, a tiny Indian village from a distant water source  on April 30, 2009. 
Many millions of India’s children are forced to spend much of their day on carrying water instead of going to school. Most wells in this village have already run dry due to the prolonged drought in the region. Villagers lost more than half of their livestock this year. The entire village boycotted the last elections blaming all political parties for failing to solve their drinking water problems. Most parents already refuse to marry their children to the village boys because of the acute water shortage.

India's entire Bundelkhand region is dependent on the monsoon rain for irrigation, both directly and indirectly. You don't need to read the recent studies to realize that the population is severely malnourished. In addition to some of the obvious reasons, such as inadequate irrigation facilities, scanty rainfall and persistent drought situation, the practice of agriculture has changed largely due to shifts in the cropping patterns that are profit driven and by governmental agricultural policies as well. Water shortages have become acute. Hunger and malnutrition are reaching extreme limits. Cattle have perished in the thousands due to hunger and thirst. Several hunger related deaths and distress-related suicides have occured in vast rural areas.Gallery

    “I think we need to be more humble and recognise that we don’t know what the solutions are” – Professor Anirudh Krishna

“I think we need to be more humble and recognise that we don’t know what the solutions are” – Professor Anirudh Krishna

Preceding a workshop organised by the LSE South Asia Centre to discuss the findings of his new book The Broken Ladder: The Paradox and the Potential of India’s One Billion with students and faculty, Professor Anirudh Krishna spoke with Rebecca Bowers about the growing need to address India’s inequality by implementing ground-level solutions.  

RB: How would you say that Broken Ladder builds […]

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    What should be the future of UK-Bangladesh relations after aid? Exit DFID, enter the Universities.

What should be the future of UK-Bangladesh relations after aid? Exit DFID, enter the Universities.

Following its application to the UN to graduate out of its Least Developed Country Status, Saleemul Huq and David Lewis suggest a new future for UK-Bangladesh relations once Bangladesh achieves this in 2021.

Ever since Bangladesh became an independent country in December 1971 the United Kingdom has been a major development partner. For the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) its bilateral aid programme, most of […]

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    Escaping the paradox of slow growth and labour scarcity in Sri Lanka

Escaping the paradox of slow growth and labour scarcity in Sri Lanka

Despite its growing reputation as one of the stronger economies of South Asia, the image of Sri Lankan labour may be at risk following a thirty-year civil conflict, alternative spending priorities and growing institutional imperfections. Labour market reforms and private sector action is required to help Sri Lanka escape the paradox of slow growth and labour scarcity, Ganeshan Wignaraja writes.

In The […]

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    Alleviating rural poverty through alternative means of livelihood development

Alleviating rural poverty through alternative means of livelihood development

Drawing on data from Balochistan, Asmat Kakar and Ghulam Rasool Baloch argue that the new provincial government is well placed to further implement ongoing community driven programmes, with the potential to extend this kind of intervention to all districts.  

The poorest of the poor are the landless in rural areas, followed closely by the land-poor – those whose landholdings are too […]

August 9th, 2018|Development, Featured, Rural Areas|Comments Off on Alleviating rural poverty through alternative means of livelihood development|
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    Book Review: Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste by Diane Coffey and Dean Spears

Book Review: Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste by Diane Coffey and Dean Spears

In Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste, authors Diane Coffey and Dean Spears propose that Modi’s ambitious goal to introduce toilets to 123 million households across India will be thwarted by the failure to lower open defecation, which they argue, is linked to a concern for purity over germs, writes Asif Dowla.

Where India Goes: Abandoned […]

August 8th, 2018|Book Reviews, Development, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Book Review: Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste by Diane Coffey and Dean Spears|

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