Urban India

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Bilion by Anirudh Krishna

Book Review: Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Bilion by Anirudh Krishna

 In Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Billion, Anirudh Krishna offers a ‘worms eye’ view of development, arguing for policy that is attuned to local locations. Whilst gender and state-based differences could be explored further in relation to the problems of development in India, Krishna provides insight into the challenges of contemporary Indian development, Sohini Kar finds. 

Broken Ladder: The Paradox […]

September 10th, 2018|Book Reviews, Development, Featured, Rural Areas, Urban India|Comments Off on Book Review: Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Bilion by Anirudh Krishna|
  • Permalink Young girls carry pots of water in Shoba Mahar, a tiny Indian village from a distant water source  on April 30, 2009. 
Many millions of India’s children are forced to spend much of their day on carrying water instead of going to school. Most wells in this village have already run dry due to the prolonged drought in the region. Villagers lost more than half of their livestock this year. The entire village boycotted the last elections blaming all political parties for failing to solve their drinking water problems. Most parents already refuse to marry their children to the village boys because of the acute water shortage.

India's entire Bundelkhand region is dependent on the monsoon rain for irrigation, both directly and indirectly. You don't need to read the recent studies to realize that the population is severely malnourished. In addition to some of the obvious reasons, such as inadequate irrigation facilities, scanty rainfall and persistent drought situation, the practice of agriculture has changed largely due to shifts in the cropping patterns that are profit driven and by governmental agricultural policies as well. Water shortages have become acute. Hunger and malnutrition are reaching extreme limits. Cattle have perished in the thousands due to hunger and thirst. Several hunger related deaths and distress-related suicides have occured in vast rural areas.Gallery

    “I think we need to be more humble and recognise that we don’t know what the solutions are” – Professor Anirudh Krishna

“I think we need to be more humble and recognise that we don’t know what the solutions are” – Professor Anirudh Krishna

Preceding a workshop organised by the LSE South Asia Centre to discuss the findings of his new book The Broken Ladder: The Paradox and the Potential of India’s One Billion with students and faculty, Professor Anirudh Krishna spoke with Rebecca Bowers about the growing need to address India’s inequality by implementing ground-level solutions.  

RB: How would you say that Broken Ladder builds […]

Broken Ladder: Anirudh Krishna workshop report

Professor Anirudh Krishna joined academics and students at the London School of Economics in a workshop organised by LSE South Asia Centre. The workshop, examining key themes of Krishna’s latest book Broken Ladder: The Paradox and Potential of India’s One Billion, provided a platform to exchange ideas on potential solutions and strategies to address the mass poverty experienced by […]

July 27th, 2018|Development, Economy, Education, Events, Featured, Rural Areas, Urban India|Comments Off on Broken Ladder: Anirudh Krishna workshop report|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Expansion and deterioration: considering the environmental implications of the multiplier effect for New Delhi

Expansion and deterioration: considering the environmental implications of the multiplier effect for New Delhi

With rising temperatures and scarce potable water, Delhi must address the the under-researched and yet widely experienced phenomenon of climate change at the urban scale in its next master plan, writes Mahak Agrawal.

It is important to highlight the under-researched yet widely experienced phenomenon of climate change at urban scale, especially in light of latest developments with respect to planning exercise […]

June 26th, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Environment, Featured, Urban India|Comments Off on Expansion and deterioration: considering the environmental implications of the multiplier effect for New Delhi|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Everyday life versus ‘world-class’ aspirations: the (re)imagined roads of Bangalore city

Everyday life versus ‘world-class’ aspirations: the (re)imagined roads of Bangalore city

The aim of transforming urban roads in Bangalore into “world-class” roads by Tender-SURE is more of an imposition rather than a true representation of the informed collective aspirations of citizens, writes G Sai Sanath.

Formalised in 2012, Tender-SURE (Tender Specification for Urban Road Execution) is an urban roads development project in Bangalore city with a particular focus on pedestrians and […]

June 19th, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Featured, Society and Culture, Urban India|Comments Off on Everyday life versus ‘world-class’ aspirations: the (re)imagined roads of Bangalore city|
  • Permalink Max Wilson Follow
Sri Lanka Rowing Woman CC BY 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/maximus852/15354911159/in/photolist-poRW8z-bWPoke-cfbSGj-cqZ2K3-dcfd28-cieV9J-6Cn1zP-7Hd4Xn-6Cr92d-7Hh9Dm-6Cn1K8-6Cr8mj-6CmZv6-6Cr8pQ-6Cr8Jd-TEGn4-HkM4d-5MgH5V-5MkVz3-oPYXkb-5MgLui-711oaL-6Cr86q-HZz9Sb-9qUBen-sp1sGM-6TvPU7-6TvPU5-6CmZ4H-5MgMXT-ph84vU-qVqjWp-73iamh-bGkUx8-711ofJ-68qtmu-5MgFCH-5MgP8Z-5Mm5sq-711o5s-5Mm2V9-5MgL4F-5Mm4VL-5MgLcX-5Mm5ab-5MkWf7-8BdnBQ-6TvMEJ-6CmZTT-J8RgrGallery

    Reflections on a masterclass: Poverty, Social Welfare and Data in Sri Lanka

Reflections on a masterclass: Poverty, Social Welfare and Data in Sri Lanka

As part of the first ever Colombo Development Dialogue held in April 2018, a masterclass with Dr Rajesh Venugopal was organised by South Asia Centre, LSE in collaboration with UNDP in Sri Lanka. Amayaa Wijesinghe, of the University of Colombo, reports her experience. 
It isn’t often that you are transported to the lecture halls of one of the world’s premier universities, hearing […]

April 26th, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Development, Economy, Events, Featured, LSE, Rural Areas, Sustainable Development Goals, Urban India|Comments Off on Reflections on a masterclass: Poverty, Social Welfare and Data in Sri Lanka|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Why urban Indian women turn down job opportunities away from home

Why urban Indian women turn down job opportunities away from home

According to a 2017 study by the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) women in urban India turn down better employment opportunities further away from home in favour of lower-paid local opportunities as the public transport system is often unreliable or unaffordable, Angel Mohan writes.

Mumbai: Women in urban India turn down better employment opportunities further away from home […]

April 25th, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Featured, Gender, Urban India|Comments Off on Why urban Indian women turn down job opportunities away from home|
  • Permalink Gallery

    The grass is greener when there is education: an experience from Balochistan  

The grass is greener when there is education: an experience from Balochistan  

Literacy and socio-economic indicators of Balochistan province in Pakistan are a grave reminder of the state of poverty in the region. Asmat Kakar draws from his personal experience of growing up in the region and writes that only education can level the playing field and provide socio-economic development. 

Social scientists and international organisations are of the view that access to high quality primary education can make a substantial and enduring difference to the lives of children living in […]

A one-size-fits-all approach is harming our rainfed farmers

Government policies today ignore a majority of our country’s farmers. Focussing on rainfed farmers can actually change the poverty map of India writes Ashwini Kulkarni
Popular narratives paint the Indian farmer with a broad brush. The dominant image is that of a farmer—male, of course—gazing benevolently at his vast fields laden with lush crops–the image created by Bollywood.

The truth though, is that […]

February 24th, 2018|Agriculture, Development, Economy, Rural Areas, Sustainable Development Goals, Urban India|Comments Off on A one-size-fits-all approach is harming our rainfed farmers|
  • Permalink https://www.flickr.com/photos/jmenj/9300381646 Jeanne Menjoulet CC BY 2.0Gallery

    Do more with less: managing public investment in federal Nepal

Do more with less: managing public investment in federal Nepal

Nepal’s success or failure hinges on how effectively the governments at all levels can deliver public services, which demands proper fiscal and investment management. Mukti Subedi and Bishal K Chalise write that the national framework for public financial management, particularly in the context of transition to federalism, is non-existent.

Two years ago, Nepal adopted a new constitution which was a culmination of a decade-long peace process […]

Bad Behavior has blocked 1619 access attempts in the last 7 days.