Gender

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    Supporting motherhood – or discouraging parenthood? A curious case of the extended maternity leave in India

Supporting motherhood – or discouraging parenthood? A curious case of the extended maternity leave in India

The Government of India’s recent move to increase maternity leave may have been a well-intentioned policy, but it has created a gap between costs to a company for male and female employees and reinforced traditional gender roles in childcare. Mitali Nikore analyses the weakness of the policy decision and makes recommendations on how it can be improved.

The Maternity Benefit […]

Where is the $2 billion for Indian mothers?

Indian mothers are all too frequently underweight during their pregnancies and unable to produce sufficient breastmilk when their babies are born, perpetuating malnutrition among their children. Swati Narayan writes that although there are provisions in place to address some of these issues, these have not been effectively implemented. What is more, the most recent budget threatens to restrict the […]

March 13th, 2017|Development, Economy, Featured, Gender, Health, LSE|Comments Off on Where is the $2 billion for Indian mothers?|
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    “Lipstick Under My Burkha tells stories that have simmered under the surface for a very long time. They need their space.” – Ratna Pathak Shah

“Lipstick Under My Burkha tells stories that have simmered under the surface for a very long time. They need their space.” – Ratna Pathak Shah

Following the CBFC decision to ban Alankrita Shrivastava’s new film Lipstick Under My Burkha, Ruhi Khan speaks to lead actress Ratna Pathak Shah about the treatment of her latest work, women’s issues in India and the role of the creative industries in holding a mirror to society.

Bollywood veteran actor Ratna Pathak Shah is astounded that the Indian Central Board of […]

March 4th, 2017|Featured, Gender, Interviews, LSE, Society and Culture|Comments Off on “Lipstick Under My Burkha tells stories that have simmered under the surface for a very long time. They need their space.” – Ratna Pathak Shah|
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    Beyond corruption: Re-conceptualising the political economy of Pakistan

Beyond corruption: Re-conceptualising the political economy of Pakistan

The narrative around corruption at the individual level has been blown out of proportion, to the extent that it is disrupting constructive discussions around the most pressing challenges faced by Pakistani society, writes Danish Khan. While it is undoubtedly and issue, he argues political economic discussions would be much more productive if they incorporated analyses of the post-colonial state, […]

February 7th, 2017|Corruption, Economy, Environment, Featured, Gender, Politics|Comments Off on Beyond corruption: Re-conceptualising the political economy of Pakistan|

What works? Breaking silence on menstrual stigma and taboos

The evidence suggests that changing age-old traditions and social attitudes requires more than legal reforms and guidelines. Sangita Thebe Limbu looks at the issue of stigma around menstruation with particular reference to Nepal and highlights the wide ranging impacts which make it both a pressing human rights and development issue. She writes that a two-pronged approach which aims to […]

Will there ever be a Women’s March in Bangladesh?

There has been remarkable and quantifiable progress for Bangladeshi women since the country became independent in 1971, particularly in terms of women’s political representation. But Tasmiah Rahman draws on her own professional research and personal experiences to argue that the connection between women in power and empowerment of women is missing.

The Women’s March on Washington gathered millions of […]

January 30th, 2017|Development, Featured, Gender, Law, LSE, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Will there ever be a Women’s March in Bangladesh?|
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    The regressive and restrictive Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill does little to protect women from exploitation

The regressive and restrictive Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill does little to protect women from exploitation

The Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill approved by the Union Cabinet in August 2016 proposes a complete ban on commercial surrogacy and advocates solely its altruistic form. Anjora Sarangi writes there is a dire need to recognise that placing a blanket ban on commercial surrogacy cannot be an overarching solution to the problem of exploitation of women that the practice might result in. She […]

January 4th, 2017|Featured, Gender, Law, LSE|1 Comment|
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    2016 in review: Top five articles on gender issues in South Asia

2016 in review: Top five articles on gender issues in South Asia

It is widely understood that the challenges facing poor or marginalised groups are invariably complicated by gender, particularly in patriarchal societies which exist in South Asia. This year, South Asia @ LSE contributors have explored the gendered impacts of natural disasters, weighed up the pros and cons of initiatives designed to help women and girls and discussed how to improve […]

December 29th, 2016|Featured, Gender|Comments Off on 2016 in review: Top five articles on gender issues in South Asia|
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    Book Review: Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States edited by Sari K. Ishii

Book Review: Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States edited by Sari K. Ishii

In Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States, editor Sari K. Ishii brings together contributors to explore new and emerging patterns of transnational marriage migration in East and Southeast Asia. This book is a valuable contribution to research that complicates many existing assumptions – such as the perception that it is mainly women from poorer […]

December 9th, 2016|Book Reviews, Featured, Gender, Law, LSE, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Book Review: Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States edited by Sari K. Ishii|
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    The gender dilemmas of community-based peacebuilding: a case study from post-conflict Nepal

The gender dilemmas of community-based peacebuilding: a case study from post-conflict Nepal

Community-based approaches to peacebuilding and an emphasis on including women’s voices in the process have given rise to models that devolve the responsibility of building peace to local women’s organisations in post-conflict situations. Drawing on her research into an initiative in Nepal, Smita Ramnarain raises questions around the model peacebuilding centred on voluntary, community-oriented work led by women and […]

November 28th, 2016|Development, Featured, Gender|Comments Off on The gender dilemmas of community-based peacebuilding: a case study from post-conflict Nepal|

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