History

  • Permalink Three Hindu priests writing religious texts in the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir, taken by an unknown photographer in the 1890s. This three members of this group of Brahmins, members the priestly caste, are engaged in copying out sacred texts from which they read as part of their duties at ceremonies and festivals. Downloaded from the British Library Web Site by Fowler&fowler«Talk» 21:34, 29 March 2007 (UTC) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kashmir-hindu-priests.jpgGallery

    Book review: On Uncertain Ground – Displaced Kashmiri Pandits in Jammu & Kashmir by Ankur Datta.

Book review: On Uncertain Ground – Displaced Kashmiri Pandits in Jammu & Kashmir by Ankur Datta.

Ankur Datta, a social anthropologist, draws on his doctoral thesis to chart the experiences of Kashmiri Pandits who migrated from the Kashmir Valley in 1990. His book addresses themes of violence and victimhood in the context of forced migration. Mark Mistry finds Datta’s testimony on Kashmiri Pandits’ displacement compelling, yet is left frustrated by the missed opportunity to delve […]

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    ‘Think about the silences more deeply. Look for what is missing.’ – Dr Sumita Mukherjee

‘Think about the silences more deeply. Look for what is missing.’ – Dr Sumita Mukherjee

Following her lecture ‘Indian Responses to British Women’s Social Activism in the Interwar Period’, organised by the LSE Library, Dr Sumita Mukherjee discusses her archival research with Rebecca Bowers, and the legacies of Anglo-Indian interactions vis-à-vis the women’s movement and beyond in India today. 

RB: You briefly mentioned how in discussing birth control debates we can see the ways in which Indian women […]

Mumbai’s Sassoon Docks, a reflection of changing times

In this photo essay, Rohit Sinha and Aadi Rungta trace the economic importance of Sassoon Docks, one of Mumbai’s oldest and largest wholesale fish market.  The docks are a monument to Mumbai’s mercantile past as well as its thriving fishing economy.

A visit to the docks is almost always overwhelming. The stench of fishes extends for miles; the sight colourful boats and their flags, competing with […]

Commonwealth in the time of Brexit

The idea that the Commonwealth can serve the interests of both India and Britain has not just survived in the face of many ups and downs, but has come back to the fore. The question today, then, is no longer about whether India and Britain should resurrect the Commonwealth, but how writes C. Raja Mohan.

As India hosts Charles, the Prince of Wales this […]

November 16th, 2017|Featured, History, Politics|0 Comments|

The future of FATA: when reforms come knocking 

With the announcement of the FATA reforms, the time for change in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) may have finally come. Samra Anwar and Abdur Rehman Cheema give a lowdown on why democratic processes have taken so long to arrive and the challenges ahead.

With Pakistani Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi re-initiating the process of mainstreaming Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), the region is again in the limelight. Unlike his predecessors, Abbasi seems to be serious on the […]

October 26th, 2017|Corruption, Development, Economy, Featured, History, Politics, Security and Foreign Policy, Society and Culture|Comments Off on The future of FATA: when reforms come knocking |
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    Book Review: Law and the Economy in Colonial India by Tirthankar Roy and Anand V. Swamy

Book Review: Law and the Economy in Colonial India by Tirthankar Roy and Anand V. Swamy

In Law and Economy, Tirthankar Roy and Anand V. Swamy explore the origins of of British law and its continued legal impediments of the Indian economy today. It is a splendid book and the conclusions are many and nuanced. It is refreshing to encounter such dispassionate, evidence-based analysis of subjects that are so often polemical, writes Professor Peter Robb.
Law […]

October 11th, 2017|Book Reviews, Economy, Featured, History, Law|Comments Off on Book Review: Law and the Economy in Colonial India by Tirthankar Roy and Anand V. Swamy|

Intergenerational perspectives on caste in the UK

In a recent study, Rina Arya investigated how attitudes to caste varied between generations in the Hindu Punjabi community living in the Greater Manchester area. Here she offers a summary of the research and writes that it points to the continuing – albeit evolving – significance of caste in the diaspora.

Caste and class are significant issues within Hindu society, […]

August 17th, 2017|Featured, History, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Intergenerational perspectives on caste in the UK|

India and Pakistan at 70: Is democracy in peril?

As Pakistan and India mark the 70th anniversary of independence from British colonial rule, Katharine Adeney and Wilfried Swenden compare the two countries’ divergent political pathways. They write that while India has undoubtedly performed ‘better’ than Pakistan on most democratic indicators, the current tide of Hindu nationalism may provide the biggest challenge to Indian democracy yet.

The 14th/15th August 2017 marks a special birthday. Seven […]

August 15th, 2017|Featured, History, Politics|Comments Off on India and Pakistan at 70: Is democracy in peril?|
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    Building bridges: The two Punjabs as a model for India-Pakistan relations

Building bridges: The two Punjabs as a model for India-Pakistan relations

Despite periodic détentes since the 1990s India-Pakistan relations are at a low point ahead of the anniversary of Partition. On the other hand, the two Punjabs have often had a better relationship, despite the fact they bore the brunt of the upheaval and violence alongside Sind and Rajasthan 70 years ago. Tridivesh Singh Maini and Sandeep Sachdeva discuss how people-to-people contacts and trade ties have […]

August 11th, 2017|Economy, Featured, History, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on Building bridges: The two Punjabs as a model for India-Pakistan relations|

Book Review: Prison Narratives by Akhtar Baloch

Prison Narratives is a translation of a diary by Akhtar Baloch, an 18-year-old female Sindhi activist. Asad Abbasi finds the core of the book, which documents the period in 1970 when Baloch was imprisoned for leading a protest, to be insightful, imaginative and full of interesting characters, yet finds the contextualising additions to be deeply partisan. Nevertheless, he writes […]

July 28th, 2017|Book Reviews, Featured, Gender, History, LSE, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Book Review: Prison Narratives by Akhtar Baloch|

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