Interviews

  • Permalink Gallery

    “Bangladesh is associated with the idea of resilience and the idea of a quiet revolution” – Shahpar Selim

“Bangladesh is associated with the idea of resilience and the idea of a quiet revolution” – Shahpar Selim

Following the ‘Idea of Bangladesh’ panel, forming part of the first LSE-UC Berkeley Summit, panellist Shahpar Selim spoke to Rebecca Bowers about the current greening initiatives taking place in garment factories across Bangladesh, and the potential to improve in the coming years.   

RB: Following on from today’s panel, can you tell us more about the current project that you’re working on […]

September 12th, 2018|Environment, Featured, Interviews|Comments Off on “Bangladesh is associated with the idea of resilience and the idea of a quiet revolution” – Shahpar Selim|
  • Permalink Young girls carry pots of water in Shoba Mahar, a tiny Indian village from a distant water source  on April 30, 2009. 
Many millions of India’s children are forced to spend much of their day on carrying water instead of going to school. Most wells in this village have already run dry due to the prolonged drought in the region. Villagers lost more than half of their livestock this year. The entire village boycotted the last elections blaming all political parties for failing to solve their drinking water problems. Most parents already refuse to marry their children to the village boys because of the acute water shortage.

India's entire Bundelkhand region is dependent on the monsoon rain for irrigation, both directly and indirectly. You don't need to read the recent studies to realize that the population is severely malnourished. In addition to some of the obvious reasons, such as inadequate irrigation facilities, scanty rainfall and persistent drought situation, the practice of agriculture has changed largely due to shifts in the cropping patterns that are profit driven and by governmental agricultural policies as well. Water shortages have become acute. Hunger and malnutrition are reaching extreme limits. Cattle have perished in the thousands due to hunger and thirst. Several hunger related deaths and distress-related suicides have occured in vast rural areas.Gallery

    “I think we need to be more humble and recognise that we don’t know what the solutions are” – Professor Anirudh Krishna

“I think we need to be more humble and recognise that we don’t know what the solutions are” – Professor Anirudh Krishna

Preceding a workshop organised by the LSE South Asia Centre to discuss the findings of his new book The Broken Ladder: The Paradox and the Potential of India’s One Billion with students and faculty, Professor Anirudh Krishna spoke with Rebecca Bowers about the growing need to address India’s inequality by implementing ground-level solutions.  

RB: How would you say that Broken Ladder builds […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

“If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

Preceding an evening of celebrating the life of eminent human rights activist and lawyer Asma Jahangir at LSE, her friend and fellow activist I.A. Rehman discussed his work in Pakistan, the establishment of the HRCP (Human Rights Commission, Pakistan) and Asma’s powerful legacy with Amber Darr.  

AD: How did you begin your human rights journey?

IAR: It started in 1949, when I […]

August 7th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, Law, Religion, Society and Culture|Comments Off on “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman|
  • Permalink Gallery

    “It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta

“It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta

 Following her panel presentation on minorities during the LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit, Dr Meghna Guhathakurta spoke with Laraib Niaz on the Rohingya crisis, radicalisation and the challenges facing minority women. 

LN: You have been working with Research Initiatives Bangladesh (RIB),to assist the Rohingya refugees, since 2011. Could you elaborate on how the work is helping refugees in their integration in the […]

August 1st, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, LSE, Religion, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on “It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta|
  • Permalink Gallery

    “All we want to do is fit in. To be accepted. To be part of the group”: Discussing LGBTQ rights in Bangladesh

“All we want to do is fit in. To be accepted. To be part of the group”: Discussing LGBTQ rights in Bangladesh

Following the LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit, a representative from a queer collective in Bangladesh spoke to Rebecca Bowers on the current status of LGBTQ rights in the country.

RB: Can you share with us the journey that led you to becoming a gay rights activist?

I grew up in the port city of Chittagong, Bangladesh but since my graduation I have […]

July 24th, 2018|Featured, Gender, Human Rights, Interviews|Comments Off on “All we want to do is fit in. To be accepted. To be part of the group”: Discussing LGBTQ rights in Bangladesh|
  • Permalink Gallery

    “I don’t believe that Hindutva is Hinduism” – Dr Shashi Tharoor

“I don’t believe that Hindutva is Hinduism” – Dr Shashi Tharoor

Dr Shashi Tharoor was recently in the UK to promote his new book  Why I am a Hindu. With a general election coming up in India, the battle between Tharoor’s Congress Party and the current government, the Bharatiya Janata Party, provides an interesting backdrop for the release of Tharoor’s new book. Anishka Gheewala Lohiya had the opportunity to talk to Dr […]

  • Permalink Abhijit Banerjee - Why Indian Democracy Doesn't Deliver moreGallery

    “The private sector is much more likely to misuse Aadhar than the government.” — Abhijit Banerjee

“The private sector is much more likely to misuse Aadhar than the government.” — Abhijit Banerjee

In May 2018, LSE South Asia Centre hosted a workshop where Abhijit Banerjee, the Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics at MIT, discussed why Indian democracy doesn’t to deliver more. Ahead of the event, Anshuman Tiwari interviewed Abhijit Banerjee. Edited excerpts:
After recent changes to the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA) administrative system that attempted to reduce corruption by reforming the processes between […]

July 12th, 2018|Development, Economy, Featured, Interviews, LSE, Society and Culture|Comments Off on “The private sector is much more likely to misuse Aadhar than the government.” — Abhijit Banerjee|
  • Permalink Gallery

    “The mixture of Islam as a state religion adjoining secularism is not healthy.” – Sara Hossain 

“The mixture of Islam as a state religion adjoining secularism is not healthy.” – Sara Hossain 

On the sidelines of the LSE-Berkeley Bangladesh Summit held at LSE in June 2018, Mahima A. Jain interviewed to Bangladeshi lawyer Sara Hossain, who was a panellist discussing “Civil Society and the State”.

In this interview, Sara Hossain discusses the problems that Bangladesh faces in an attempt to balance secularism with Islam highlighting the validity and space that the government gives to views of extremist groups. “What […]

July 6th, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Corruption, Development, Featured, Gender, Interviews, Law, Politics, Religion, Sustainable Development Goals|Comments Off on “The mixture of Islam as a state religion adjoining secularism is not healthy.” – Sara Hossain |
  • Permalink Gallery

    “People like me feel like the very idea of India is under challenge” – Yogendra Yadav

“People like me feel like the very idea of India is under challenge” – Yogendra Yadav

In this video interview with Tom Wilkinson, Yogendra Yadav addresses the changing relationship between democracy and diversity in India. As the keynote speaker at the prestigious Ralph Miliband lecture, and discussant at LSE South Asian Centre event exploring ‘The Urgency of Secularism” with Amartya Sen, the academic confronts India’s modern political transformation: that is, the growing hegemony of the […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Dr Sanchita Saxena and Dr Mukulika Banerjee talk about LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit and future of Bangladesh studies

Dr Sanchita Saxena and Dr Mukulika Banerjee talk about LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit and future of Bangladesh studies

LSE South Asia Centre and the Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies at the University of California-Berkeley jointly organised the first-ever LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit 2018 held in London on June 5, 2018. In this video interview Mahima A. Jain asks Dr Sanchita Saxena, Director of Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center and Dr Mukulika Banerjee, Director of LSE South Asia […]

June 8th, 2018|Events, Featured, History, Human Rights, Interviews, LSE, Media|Comments Off on Dr Sanchita Saxena and Dr Mukulika Banerjee talk about LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit and future of Bangladesh studies|

Bad Behavior has blocked 479 access attempts in the last 7 days.