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The Ballpark podcast Episode 2.7 The Rural-Urban Divide

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The distance between America’s rural and urban communities have become a pivotal element of politics and elections. Professor Kathy Cramer has spent the last decade investigating the attitudes and identities that have contributed to this divide, and in this episode, we dive into that work with her and PhD candidate Tory Mallett.

This episode features Kathy Kramer, Director of the Morgridge […]

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    Our personality affects our ability to connect our policy preferences to the correct political party- and that’s a problem for democracy.

Our personality affects our ability to connect our policy preferences to the correct political party- and that’s a problem for democracy.

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Functioning democracies require voters to connect their own personal and subjective policy preferences to the political party that best represents them. Aaron Dusso’s new book examines how individual psychologies and people’s tendencies to be introverted or extroverted affects their ability to match their policy preference to the correct political party. He finds that the more extroverted one is, the […]

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    The money bail system places undue burden on the incarcerated poor- but risk informed release can change that

The money bail system places undue burden on the incarcerated poor- but risk informed release can change that

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The money bail system widely used throughout the American criminal justice system requires a defendant to pay a specified sum of money or await their trail from a jail cell, placing undue burden on the poor. New research by Dottie Carmichael, Heather Caspers, Nicholas Davis, Trey Marchbanks, George Naufal and Steve Wood focuses on the use of validated risk […]

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    Trump supporters’ resistance to social justice efforts is driven by their meritocratic ideology, not bias.

Trump supporters’ resistance to social justice efforts is driven by their meritocratic ideology, not bias.

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Trump supporters are more resistant to social justice efforts than other Americans, but not because of bias. Rather, many Trump supporters are “rugged meritocratists”- those who resist social justice efforts because they believe that American society is already fair. Erin Cech argues that if rugged meritocratists are to heed calls for social justice, they must first be convinced that inequality actually […]

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    Public opinion is less supportive of redistribution and social security in the US than in Europe – but many US citizens want to see more done to reduce poverty and inequality

Public opinion is less supportive of redistribution and social security in the US than in Europe – but many US citizens want to see more done to reduce poverty and inequality

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Congressional Republicans failed to repeal and dismantle Obamacare this past August, which has once again put the spotlight on how difficult it is to reach an agreement about health care coverage for US citizens. This lies in stark contrast to policies in most countries in Western Europe, where universal health care coverage is taken for granted. How can we […]

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    The Ballpark podcast Episode 2.6: Racism towards Latinos: Past, present, and future

The Ballpark podcast Episode 2.6: Racism towards Latinos: Past, present, and future

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The current US president is not the first American leader to use inflammatory rhetoric about Latinos and push anti-immigration policies, but Donald Trump’s presidency has certainly brought these issue to the forefront of American politics. This episode we’re diving into the fear, resentment, and history behind racism towards Latinos, and in doing so, we’ll see that this is far […]

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    Wars can strengthen U.S. Presidents’ policy gains in Congress, but as casualties rise, they can become a liability

Wars can strengthen U.S. Presidents’ policy gains in Congress, but as casualties rise, they can become a liability

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Wars divert public attention to foreign affairs. While this provides the president with leverage in his encounters with Congress, public perception of the war can turn the tide against him. Research by Susanne Schorpp and Charles Finocchiaro shows that the president’s gains from public attention to foreign affairs are mediated by the human cost of war. As casualties increase, the public’s position will shift from support to blame, allowing Members of Congress […]

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    ‘Had enough of experts?’ Anti-intellectualism is linked to voters’ support for movements that are skeptical of expertise

‘Had enough of experts?’ Anti-intellectualism is linked to voters’ support for movements that are skeptical of expertise

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The success of politicians (e.g., Donald Trump) and political movements (e.g., Brexit) that express skepticism toward experts raises important questions about the political implications of declining trust in expertise. Research from Matt Motta shows that anti-intellectualism – the distrust and dislike of experts – is associated with support for political candidates and movements who share those feelings. It is […]

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    Extra Innings: Summer Lecture from Professor Kathy Cramer “The Politics of Resentment in the 2016 US Presidential Election”

Extra Innings: Summer Lecture from Professor Kathy Cramer “The Politics of Resentment in the 2016 US Presidential Election”

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University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor Katherine J. Cramer discussed how rural American resentment toward cities and the urban elite can provide fertile ground for right-leaning candidates to win elections, and the implications of this on contemporary politics in the US and beyond.

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    Long Read Review: Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law by James Q. Whitman

Long Read Review: Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law by James Q. Whitman

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In Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law, legal scholar James Q. Whitman examines how Nazi Germany looked to the model of the Jim Crow laws in the USA when formulating the Nuremberg Laws in the 1930s. This is a carefully researched and timely analysis of how racist ideology can penetrate the political and institutional fabric of societies, furthermore underscoring […]

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