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Colliding worlds: Donald Trump and the European Union

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Donald Trump’s decision to impose steel and aluminium tariffs on EU states has raised fears of a trade war developing. Michael Cottakis writes that the dispute not only reflects a difference in approaches to trade, but a clash of two world views. He argues that a rupture between the EU and the US would represent a death knell for […]

What provoked Trump’s tariffs: politics or economics?

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Stephanie Rickard analyses recent tariffs imposed by the US, arguing that they fulfil election promises that helped Donald Trump win votes in 2016 and may pay further dividends in 2020.

Politics, not economics, provoked Trump’s metal tariffs. While campaigning for the presidency, Trump promised to protect American steel workers from international competition. He made this promise in order to win votes.

To […]

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    Maine’s election shows that ranked-choice voting is hot right now. But we have been here before.

Maine’s election shows that ranked-choice voting is hot right now. But we have been here before.

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This week voters in the Pine Tree State chose to continue using ranked-choice voting in state-wide elections. Jack Santucci explains that ranked-choice voting is likely to be adopted in polarized political environments, creating majorities where there currently are none, and as a reaction to unpopular politicians who have won without majorities of votes. He reminds us that the current […]

Why the racialization of American politics is here to stay

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Since the election of Barack Obama and continuing with the rise of Donald trump in 2016, American politics has become more and more racialized. While levels of racial resentment have remained largely unchanged since the 1980s, Adam Enders and Jamil Scott find new evidence that it has become increasingly correlated with political issues such as vote choice, partisanship […]

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    Why the developing world should look beyond the US experience as a model to manage rapid urbanization.

Why the developing world should look beyond the US experience as a model to manage rapid urbanization.

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By 2100, eight billion people could live in cities in what is now the developing world. As local and national policy makers grapple with how to manage this rapid population change, many look to the US experience of rural-urban transformation in the 20th century. Juan Pablo Chauvin cautions that differences in key drivers of change such as internal migration […]

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    State legislators are less likely to respond to constituents who are not white

State legislators are less likely to respond to constituents who are not white

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The election of Donald Trump in 2016 has reignited debates over immigration and race in America. In new research, Micah Gell-Redman, Neil Visalvanich, Charles Crabtree, and Christopher Fariss examine how state legislators respond to minority and immigrant constituents by sending emails to more than 5,000 elected officials in 42 states. They find that Black and Hispanic senders were less […]

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    An older Congress tends to support more policies that benefit older Americans

An older Congress tends to support more policies that benefit older Americans

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While experience can be an important part of being an effective politician, the average age of a US senator is 62; for the House it is 58. In new work, Matthew R. Haydon and James M. Curry look at why it matters if Congress is older than the rest of the country. Examining over 13,000 Congressional bills, they find […]

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    Book Review: When the State Meets the Street: Public Service and Moral Agency by Bernardo Zacka

Book Review: When the State Meets the Street: Public Service and Moral Agency by Bernardo Zacka

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In When the State Meets the Street: Public Service and Moral Agency, Bernardo Zacka draws on eight months of fieldwork working as a receptionist in an anti-poverty agency to challenge dominant understandings of the role that bureaucrats and bureaucracy play in the functioning of the state. Alex Sager praises this as a subtle and thoughtful discussion that opens up a […]

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    Book Review: Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility by Jo Littler

Book Review: Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility by Jo Littler

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In Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility, Jo Littler offers a rich analysis that intricately teases out the grasp ‘merit’ and ‘meritocracy’ have on everyday cultural and social narratives of value and power in contemporary society. This is a rewarding contribution to the shared work of challenging hegemonic, neoliberal myths that uphold the status quo, recommends Sarah Burton, and to […]

The voice of the silent majority behind bitcoin’s rise

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More analytic efforts should seek to identify the opinions from the long tail of the online community, write Feng Mai, Zhe Shan and Xin (Shane) Wang.

How much is a bitcoin worth? This question is difficult to answer because bitcoin, and cryptocurrencies in general, are notoriously volatile. Users face significant market risk because of the fluctuation in the exchange rate between bitcoin […]

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