Economy

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    Public education benefited from oil booms in the postbellum South

Public education benefited from oil booms in the postbellum South

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Oil-rich counties were more likely to contribute funds to build schools and hire more teachers for rural black children, writes Stephan Maurer.

Natural resources are often thought as a curse, rather than a blessing. They have, for example, been found to help entrench autocratic regimes, impede female labor market involvement, and fuel both intra-state wars and internal conflicts.

Granted, natural resources […]

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    Book Review: The Great Regression edited by Heinrich Geiselberger

Book Review: The Great Regression edited by Heinrich Geiselberger

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How do we make sense of the dramatic political changes of recent months? In The Great Regression, editor Heinrich Geiselberger brings together contributors including Nancy Fraser, Arjun Appadurai and Bruno Latour to grapple with the causes and consequences of this ostensible ‘great regression’. While questioning the tendency to centralise ‘the left’ as the prime site of blame, Elisa Pannini praises this cross-national collection […]

Why flying is safer than ever and what we can learn from it

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A smart approach to management and design, rather than technological breakthroughs or strict government policies, lie behind commercial aviation’s remarkable safety record, write Chris Clearfield and András Tilcsik.

When it was reported that there had been no deaths from commercial passenger jet accidents in 2017, President Trump was quick to claim credit on Twitter: “Since taking office I have been […]

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    Book Review: The Fix: How Bankers Lied, Cheated and Colluded to Rig the World’s Most Important Number by Liam Vaughan and Gavin Finch

Book Review: The Fix: How Bankers Lied, Cheated and Colluded to Rig the World’s Most Important Number by Liam Vaughan and Gavin Finch

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In The Fix: How Bankers Lied, Cheated and Colluded to Rig the World’s Most Important Number, Liam Vaughan and Gavin Finch offer a multidimensional journalistic account of the Libor scandal, drawing on interviews, court testimony and legal evidence. With the book unravelling like an engaging detective story and full of lively portraits of key characters, Maria Zhivitskaya only wishes […]

What might be behind Trump’s tariffs on steel imports?

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An analysis of possible motives and what they imply for a possible EU reaction – by Stephen Woolcock.

Last Thursday President Trump acted to impose 25 per cent tariffs on steel and 10 per cent tariffs on aluminium. This action followed an investigation under Section 232 of the 1962 US Trade Expansion Act by the US Commerce Department of whether […]

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    When interest rates hit the zero lower bound: a discussion on uncertainty

When interest rates hit the zero lower bound: a discussion on uncertainty

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When the Fed is constrained by the ZLB, there’s greater uncertainty and the relationship between uncertainty and economic activity is stronger, write Michael Plante, Alexander Richter and Nathaniel Throckmorton.

In December 2008, the financial crisis and the subsequent recession compelled the Federal Reserve to take unprecedented action to reduce the federal funds rate to its zero lower bound (ZLB). Hitting […]

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    Book Review: The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century by Walter Scheidel

Book Review: The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century by Walter Scheidel

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In The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century, Walter Scheidel offers an account of how ‘Four Horsemen’ – warfare; revolution; state collapse; and pandemics – have been the primary mode through which income levelling has occurred throughout history. While this is a key contribution to the study of inequality, Roberto Iacono hopes […]

  • Permalink The Exchange Square 交易廣場 is a building complex located in Central, Hong Kong. 

The property is the home of the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong since the 1980s. It also houses many international banking and law firms ncluding Credit Suisse, Bank of Montreal, Lloyd George Management, Latham & Watkins, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, Allen & Overy and Allens Arthur Robinson. It is also home to the consulates in Hong Kong of Argentina, Canada, Japan, and the American Club of Hong Kong.
 
Pictured is One Exchange Square and Two Exchange Square from the point of view from the entrance level—which, like many hotels in Hong kong, is not on the ground floor but at the elevated footbridge level.

This photo was taken at night so it is a bit grainy. And as usual, I find this extreme wide angle view up to be more interesting than other perspectives.

# SML Data
+ Date: 2013-02-09 22:29:08 GMT+0800
+ Dimensions: 4979 x 3319
+ Exposure: 1/13 sec at f/4.0
+ Focal Length: 17 mm
+ ISO: 3200
+ Flash: Did not fire
+ Camera: Canon EOS 7D
+ Lens: Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM
+ GPS: 22°17'0Gallery

    Book Review: A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism by Kean Birch

Book Review: A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism by Kean Birch

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In A Research Agenda for Neoliberalism, Kean Birch seeks to bring clarity to the ubiquitous use of ‘neoliberalism’ as a term in academic and popular discourse, looking at how analysts from across the political spectrum have understood this concept. The book does a valuable job of establishing the contours of existing discussions of neoliberalism, finds Christopher May, and would be […]

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    Economists think Trump harmed the world economy, but not that of their country

Economists think Trump harmed the world economy, but not that of their country

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A survey asked over 1,000 economic experts how the US president is doing on key economic policy outcomes, writes Alessandro Lanteri.

On November 8th 2016, I was in Mexico City having dinner with a group of people. Suddenly, the person sitting across from me started receiving an unconscionable number of emails, messages, and calls on two devices simultaneously. As the […]

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    Private firms as global borrowers: foreign and domestic lenders need equal protection

Private firms as global borrowers: foreign and domestic lenders need equal protection

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Domestic protection alone spurs firms to default abroad first, risking credit constraints, writes Xiang Gao.

The period 1990 to 2009 has witnessed private firms being promoted as independent borrowers in the global capital market. For a sample of 85 emerging market economies, in terms of percentage measures, the private sector publicly non-guaranteed share of total external debt on average increased […]

January 13th, 2018|Economy, Xiang Gao|0 Comments|
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