Economy

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think like a 21st-Century Economist by Kate Raworth

Book Review: Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think like a 21st-Century Economist by Kate Raworth

Share this:

In Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist, Kate Raworth offers a new model for economics, based around the ‘doughnut’, which values human well-being and advocates for a ‘regenerative and distributive economy’. While the book holds multidisciplinary promise and Raworth draws upon appealing and evocative metaphors and examples to convey economic concepts in accessible terms, Maria […]

Colliding worlds: Donald Trump and the European Union

Share this:

Donald Trump’s decision to impose steel and aluminium tariffs on EU states has raised fears of a trade war developing. Michael Cottakis writes that the dispute not only reflects a difference in approaches to trade, but a clash of two world views. He argues that a rupture between the EU and the US would represent a death knell for […]

What provoked Trump’s tariffs: politics or economics?

Share this:

Stephanie Rickard analyses recent tariffs imposed by the US, arguing that they fulfil election promises that helped Donald Trump win votes in 2016 and may pay further dividends in 2020.

Politics, not economics, provoked Trump’s metal tariffs. While campaigning for the presidency, Trump promised to protect American steel workers from international competition. He made this promise in order to win votes.

To […]

The voice of the silent majority behind bitcoin’s rise

Share this:

More analytic efforts should seek to identify the opinions from the long tail of the online community, write Feng Mai, Zhe Shan and Xin (Shane) Wang.

How much is a bitcoin worth? This question is difficult to answer because bitcoin, and cryptocurrencies in general, are notoriously volatile. Users face significant market risk because of the fluctuation in the exchange rate between bitcoin […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Boycotts are more likely to be effective in industries which are highly competitive

Boycotts are more likely to be effective in industries which are highly competitive

Share this:

One of the most fundamental aspects of our market society is that consumers should have the ability to vote with their feet and to not buy certain products if they do not wish to. But when are these boycotts effective in causing corporations to change their ways? In new research, Georgy Egorov and Bard Harstad find that boycotts should […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy by Richard E. Ocejo

Book Review: Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy by Richard E. Ocejo

Share this:

In Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy, Richard E. Ocejo explores four traditionally working-class jobs – barbering, bartending, distilling and butchery – that have been increasingly redefined as hip, high-status and ‘middle-class’ for a number of urban workers today. Though the backdrop of gentrification, deindustrialisation and class hierarchy are not examined in depth, Padraic X. Scanlan finds this […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Stay at home parents face a big job market penalty when they try to re-enter the workforce

Stay at home parents face a big job market penalty when they try to re-enter the workforce

Share this:

Like those who are trying to return to the workforce after being unemployed, stay at home parents also face a disadvantage when trying to find a new job. But which is a greater disadvantage for jobseekers, unemployment or having been a stay-at-home parent? In new research which examines job openings across 50 US cities, Kate Weisshaar finds that compared […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Rising US income inequality: the disproportionate gains of the highest earners

Rising US income inequality: the disproportionate gains of the highest earners

Share this:

The historical pattern of rising transfer payments has done much to mitigate the negative impacts of rising inequality, write Kevin J. Lansing and Agnieszka Markiewicz.

The increase in U.S. income inequality since 1970 largely reflects gains made by households in the top 20 per cent of the income distribution. Estimates suggest that households outside this group have suffered significant losses […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Behavioral Economics and Healthy Behaviors edited by Yaniv Hanoch, Andrew J. Barnes and Thomas Rice

Book Review: Behavioral Economics and Healthy Behaviors edited by Yaniv Hanoch, Andrew J. Barnes and Thomas Rice

Share this:

In the collection Behavioral Economics and Healthy Behaviors: Key Concepts and Current Research, edited by Yaniv Hanoch, Andrew J. Barnes and Thomas Rice, contributors explore a number of health-related areas where behavioural economics can be used, from health behaviours to health care and policy. This volume does a good job of discussing the ‘behavioural’ aspects of behavioural economics and considering […]

  • Permalink Credit: Chris Potter (Flickr, CC-BY-2.0)Gallery

    By giving greater relief to the highest earners, the charitable deduction disadvantages charities which protect the most vulnerable

By giving greater relief to the highest earners, the charitable deduction disadvantages charities which protect the most vulnerable

Share this:

As part of its $1.5 trillion tax cut last year Congress doubled the standard deduction that taxpayers are eligible to take. Many US charities are worried that this will decrease their incomes by reducing the number of people who itemize their deductions. Kelly L. Russell writes that charities are right to be worried about this change, but also argues […]

This work by LSE USAPP blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported.