Elections and party politics across the US

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    In New York, minor-party candidates win elections all the time – because they’re also major-party candidates

In New York, minor-party candidates win elections all the time – because they’re also major-party candidates

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Minor parties have a reputation for futility in the United States, but electoral rules in certain parts of the country enable them to survive, thrive, and influence elections. Benjamin Kantack argues that fusion laws, which allow multiple parties to nominate the same candidate, give minor parties in New York the ability to affect the outcomes of close U.S. House […]

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    More than ever, Congress was forming super-majorities to circumvent the possibility of a presidential veto when political interests were at stake

More than ever, Congress was forming super-majorities to circumvent the possibility of a presidential veto when political interests were at stake

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While the President is seen as having the final say in all US policymaking, congressionally formed veto-proof supermajorities are occurred more frequently on important issues between 1981-2008. Data collected by Linda Fowler and Bryan W. Marshall examine the paradox this pattern presents; partisan divisions that traditionally made legislation difficult to pass also provided mechanisms for enhanced party control […]

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    Why lawmakers want more guns after yet another mass shooting

Why lawmakers want more guns after yet another mass shooting

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After another mass shooting, this time targeting Republican lawmakers, pro-gun politicians argue for more firearms instead of less. Sierra Smucker explains the thought process behind this argument, its historical foundations and its modern-day implications for policy making around guns in the United States.

Another mass shooting struck the United States on Wednesday, June 14th. This time Republican lawmakers were […]

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    Poor weather doesn’t dissuade voting in noncompetitive elections – not even Hurricane Sandy did in 2012

Poor weather doesn’t dissuade voting in noncompetitive elections – not even Hurricane Sandy did in 2012

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Rational choice theories of voter behavior suggest that factors such as bad weather and a busy schedule should discourage voting in noncompetitive elections. Considering voter turnout in New York City in 2012 – in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Sandy – Viviana Rivera-Burgos, Narayani Lasala-Blanco and Robert Y. Shapiro find that personal motivation to vote can override minor and even […]

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    Trump holds more positive views toward Vladimir Putin than both his predecessor and his own foreign policy team

Trump holds more positive views toward Vladimir Putin than both his predecessor and his own foreign policy team

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Content analysis of public statements by Stephen Benedict Dyson and Matthew J. Parent shows that President Trump has described a more positive approach to Russia than that of President Obama, and President Putin has responded in kind. Data shows that foreign policy officials of the Trump administration hold significantly more hostile views toward Russia than the president, providing further […]

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    The Trump administration is likely not made up of Holocaust deniers. But they do need the support of those who are.

The Trump administration is likely not made up of Holocaust deniers. But they do need the support of those who are.

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This week Donald Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer caused controversy by suggesting that the Syrian President, Bashar al-Assad was worse than Adolf Hitler in his use of chemical weapons, effectively ignoring the fact that the Nazi leader had used such weapons against German Jews during World War II. Ben Margulies writes that while it is possible Spicer simply made […]

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    Trump’s Russia connections show the need for continued vigilance over money laundering

Trump’s Russia connections show the need for continued vigilance over money laundering

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Recent weeks have seen revelations over vast money laundering schemes operating through Russian banks. Given President Trump’s alleged links to Russia, these reports have become even more important. Cerelia Athanassiou writes that these potential connections, in combination with Trump’s often murky real estate dealings, show just how vigilant regulators and financial institutions should be when it comes to looking […]

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    How advertising campaigns can help to mitigate the negative effects of voter ID laws on turnout.

How advertising campaigns can help to mitigate the negative effects of voter ID laws on turnout.

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A majority of American states have instituted some form of voter ID law, laws which have been found to reduce turnout for poor and minority populations. In new research Michael S. Lynch and Chelsie L.M. Bright examine the introduction of Kansas’ recent voter ID law. They find that in one county, the distribution of materials reassuring voters about provisional […]

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    Why Senate Democrats should vote for cloture on Gorsuch’s nomination

Why Senate Democrats should vote for cloture on Gorsuch’s nomination

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This week President Trump’s nominee for the US Supreme Court, Judge Neil Gorsuch, is likely to be confirmed by the Senate – but with few Democratic votes. John D. Rackey and P.C. Peay write that despite their stated intention not to vote for cloture on debate over Gorsuch’s nomination – which will likely lead Senate Republicans to invoke the […]

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    How negative ads from diverse right-wing media makes conservative voters dislike Democratic candidates even more

How negative ads from diverse right-wing media makes conservative voters dislike Democratic candidates even more

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Recent years have seen growing hostility between those who support different political parties in America. But what is the media’s role in creating this increasing dislike? In new research, Richard Lau, David Andersen, Tessa Ditonto, Mona Kleinberg and David Redlawsk investigate this “affective polarization” by exposing participants to different news sources and positive and negative political advertising. They find […]

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