Elections and party politics across the US

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    How playing on public concerns about crime became Republicans’ electoral Trump card

How playing on public concerns about crime became Republicans’ electoral Trump card

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Journalists, scholars, and other observers of politics have claimed for decades that the Republican Party has focused on crime as an electoral issue. In new research, Ethan D. Boldt finds that Republican congressional candidates have, in fact, shared a special relationship with the public on the issue of crime, electorally benefiting from its significance and by the party focusing […]

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    Committee membership makes Representatives better lawmakers, benefitting Congress as a whole

Committee membership makes Representatives better lawmakers, benefitting Congress as a whole

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The US House of Representatives has more than 20 committees which divide up lawmaking and encourage lawmakers to specialize. Committee members are also more likely to promote legislation in their committee’s areas. Kristina Miler finds that specialization promotes legislating; committees are successful in compelling even otherwise uninterested legislators to be more active. In light of these findings, she argues […]

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    Fatigued by Trump-era national politics, New Jerseyans have mostly tuned out of a crucial gubernatorial election

Fatigued by Trump-era national politics, New Jerseyans have mostly tuned out of a crucial gubernatorial election

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Voters in the Garden State go to the polls Tuesday to elect a successor for Governor Christie, now the most unpopular chief executive in New Jersey’s history. Ashley Koning writes that the Democratic candidate, Phil Murphy, has a comfortable lead over Republican (and Lieutenant Governor) Kim Guadagno in an election which despite having huge repercussions for the state in […]

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    Canada and the UK can learn from one another in how to regulate money in politics

Canada and the UK can learn from one another in how to regulate money in politics

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The US Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision prompted many questions both at home and overseas as to how much influence special interests should have on political campaigns. Andrea Lawlor and Erin Crandall look to Canada and the UK as examples of how these interests can be managed well in an era where money equals political speech. They find […]

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    Seattle’s public funding for candidates experiment may be both good and bad for democracy

Seattle’s public funding for candidates experiment may be both good and bad for democracy

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Next week sees Seattle residents go to the polls to elect a new mayor and City Councillors. Tory Mallett writes that what makes this election worth watching is that in Seattle, voters are able to ‘spend’ up to $100 on contributions to candidates’ campaigns via a property-tax funded voucher scheme. While the system may appear to enhance democracy by […]

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    Trump is casting a long shadow over the narrow race for Virginia governor

Trump is casting a long shadow over the narrow race for Virginia governor

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Voters in the Old Dominion State will go to the polls on November 7th to choose their next Governor. Lauren C. Bell writes that in the age of Trump, the race between Democrat Ralph Northam and Ed Gillespie is not a typical off-year election. With Gillespie tacking to the right, both national parties are watching Virginia’s election to see […]

I vote left, you vote right: How can we work together?

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Political affiliation shapes how managers make hiring decisions and employees interact in the workplace, write Philip Roth, Caren Goldberg and Jason Thatcher.

Political divisiveness continues to make news and influence our lives. In Spain, the drive for Catalonia’s independence has sparked demonstrations from both sides, including police action to close polling places. In Britain, Brexit aroused a debate marked by […]

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    Term-limited legislators use lawmaking to keep a closer hold on policy implementation

Term-limited legislators use lawmaking to keep a closer hold on policy implementation

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Many state legislators, like the President and 36 state governors, are term-limited. But what effects do these limits have on the way state legislators govern? In new research which examines legislative oversight by term-limited state representatives, Mona Vakilifathi argues that term limits motivate legislators to make laws which tie the hands of state bureaucrats to implement policies in line […]

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    The Supreme Court’s quiet gerrymandering revolution and the road to minority rule

The Supreme Court’s quiet gerrymandering revolution and the road to minority rule

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This month the US Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a Wisconsin case over the constitutionality of the Republican-dominated state legislature’s redistricting plan. Michael Latner, Anthony McGann, Charles Anthony Smith, and Alex Keena argue that while this case is important, no matter what it decides, the Supreme Court has already enabled large-scale gerrymandering. They write that the Court’s 2004 […]

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    On Twitter, Republican Senators are more polarizing than Democrats

On Twitter, Republican Senators are more polarizing than Democrats

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While President Donald Trump has become well known for his use of Twitter to criticize Democrats and cajole Republicans, he is not the only politician to use that social media network to chastise their political opponents. In new research, Annelise Russell examines how US Senators use Twitter, finding that, even when they are in the majority, Senate Republicans […]

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