U.S. History

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    Donald Trump’s presidency has a disturbing parallel in the political career of Huey Long

Donald Trump’s presidency has a disturbing parallel in the political career of Huey Long

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Donald Trump is not the first American politician to achieve power through demagoguery and then to use that power for their own gain. Adrian Mercer looks back to the political career of Louisiana Governor, then Senator, Huey P Long. He writes that the parallels between Trump and Long are striking: both won elected office by presenting themselves as outsiders […]

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    In allowing ourselves to focus on Trump’s excesses, we ignore the long historic roots of America’s problems

In allowing ourselves to focus on Trump’s excesses, we ignore the long historic roots of America’s problems

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His increasingly extreme tweet-storms may signal a mind under great stress, but Donald Trump must still be taking some satisfaction in his ability to dominate news and the wider discourse.  Ron Pruessen argues that it’s dangerous to spend too much time going along for the ride. If the excesses of this president are to be resisted and rolled back, […]

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    America’s earliest economic development initiatives provide perspective on recent battles over jobs.

America’s earliest economic development initiatives provide perspective on recent battles over jobs.

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Government efforts to attract businesses using tax incentives and other subsidies are nothing new in the United States. Matthew Freedman writes about Mississippi’s “Balance Agriculture with Industry” Program, which endeavored to attract manufacturing operations to the state using taxpayer dollars in the 1930s. Mississippi’s program shares features with many modern-day economic development initiatives, though its short- and long-run impacts […]

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    Long Read Review: Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law by James Q. Whitman

Long Read Review: Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law by James Q. Whitman

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In Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law, legal scholar James Q. Whitman examines how Nazi Germany looked to the model of the Jim Crow laws in the USA when formulating the Nuremberg Laws in the 1930s. This is a carefully researched and timely analysis of how racist ideology can penetrate the political and institutional fabric of societies, furthermore underscoring […]

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    Book Review: Eisenhower and Cambodia: Diplomacy, Covert Action and the Origins of the Second Indochina War by William J. Rust

Book Review: Eisenhower and Cambodia: Diplomacy, Covert Action and the Origins of the Second Indochina War by William J. Rust

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In Eisenhower and Cambodia: Diplomacy, Covert Action and the Origins of the Second Indochina War, William J. Rust focuses on the origins of the Vietnam War by examining the lesser studied relationship between the United States and Cambodia under the presidency of Eisenhower. Drawing upon an impressive wealth of documents, this book masterfully shows the disastrous consequences of US […]

The Ballpark podcast Episode 9: The LSE and USA

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The LSE and United States have a long, intertwined history, and in this episode, we dive into the special relationship between Americans, London, and the LSE.

This episode features Mick Cox, Professor of International Relations at LSE; Marcia Balisciano, Director of the Benjamin Franklin House in London; and Gavin Baird, recipient of the Marshall Scholarship at LSE
Listen to Episode 9 on […]

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    The Ballpark Extra Innings: The Yanks Are Coming! A lecture from Professor Mick Cox

The Ballpark Extra Innings: The Yanks Are Coming! A lecture from Professor Mick Cox

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This podcast, we dive into the history of Americans at LSE. As we’ll hear from Professor Mick Cox, the LSE has helped shape the United States, and Americans have helped define the LSE since its foundation in 1895.

There are lots of ways to catch-up with upcoming episodes of The Ballpark podcast: visit the website, the LSE’s audio channel, visit […]

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    Far from being mere ‘servants of Congress’, pre-20th century presidents were able to use federal resources to their partisan advantage

Far from being mere ‘servants of Congress’, pre-20th century presidents were able to use federal resources to their partisan advantage

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Often characterized as impotent and servile to their parties, early American presidents have been thought to have been insignificant to policy outcomes. As Jon C. Rogowski’s work on presidential influence over the Post Office Department uncovers, however, 19th-century presidents were able to make a noticeable difference to the national distribution of federal resources, to the advantage of their fellow […]

  • Permalink President Barack Obama delivers a health care address to a joint session of Congress at the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., Sept. 9, 2009. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)
 
This official White House photograph is being made available only for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photograph. The photograph may not be manipulated in any way and may not be used in commercial or political materials, advertisements, emails, products, promotions that in any way suggests approval or endorsement of the President, the First Family, or the White House.Gallery

    Democrats’ One Hope Left After 2016 Results: The Filibuster? Maybe Not.

Democrats’ One Hope Left After 2016 Results: The Filibuster? Maybe Not.

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In the midst of a Republican sweep of the Presidency, House of Representatives and the Senate, Democrats have turned to the filibuster as their final barrier against what they see as regressive Republican policies. As John Rackey of the University of Oklahoma argues, however, the Democrats’ turn to the obstructionist tool could backfire and lead to further diminished minority party powers […]

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    How network science unearthed the overlapping relationships of organized crime in Al Capone’s Chicago

How network science unearthed the overlapping relationships of organized crime in Al Capone’s Chicago

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Public fascination with organized crime is not new. In new research which studies the social relationships of organized crime in Chicago in the 1920s, Chris M. Smith and Andrew V. Papachristos were able to take advantage of this fascination with the availability of thousands of notes and documents on Al Capone’s criminal network. By applying network analysis to the […]

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