Urban, rural and regional policies

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    Book Review: The Icon Project: Architecture, Cities and Capitalist Globalisation by Leslie Sklair

Book Review: The Icon Project: Architecture, Cities and Capitalist Globalisation by Leslie Sklair

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In The Icon Project: Architecture, Cities and Capitalist Globalisation, Leslie Sklair investigates the institutional and economic structures that have underpinned the accelerated production of so-called ‘iconic’ buildings and infrastructure projects over the last 25 years. While the text could occasionally benefit from more theoretical anchoring, this will be an illuminating text for students of architecture, urban design and policy that […]

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    US Centre 2018 Student Essay Competition Runner Up: ‘What does 2018 mean for John Golomb in America?’          

US Centre 2018 Student Essay Competition Runner Up: ‘What does 2018 mean for John Golomb in America?’          

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Christopher Dann discusses the compelling case of John Golomb, a sixty-seven year old ex-steel worker from the steel town of Monessen, Pennsylvania. As a representative case of many working-class, disenfranchised voters in the Rust Belt, he highlights how Trump’s current policies on protectionism, healthcare and tax cuts have affected ‘Golombish’ voters – life-long working-class Democrats turned one-off Republicans. […]

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    Gaps in state funding mean that liberal cities in conservative states are more likely to lobby the federal government

Gaps in state funding mean that liberal cities in conservative states are more likely to lobby the federal government

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When we hear the term ‘lobbying’ we tend to think mostly in terms of corporations and ideological groups working to influence policy outcomes at the state and federal level. But cities are often lobbyists too. In new research, Rebecca Goldstein and Hye Young You examine the causes and consequences of lobbying the federal government by American cities. They find […]

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    Book Review: Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence by Rachel Sherman

Book Review: Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence by Rachel Sherman

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In Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence, Rachel Sherman undertakes 50 in-depth interviews with rich New Yorkers to consider how they navigate their anxieties and the negative connotations surrounding extreme wealth. The frank accounts offered in the book provide a complex picture of elite consumption and the attempt to reconcile affluence and moral legitimacy, finds Jonathan Yong Tienxhi.

If you are interested in the topic […]

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    Where you live and who your neighbors are influences whether or not you think closing the income gap is important.

Where you live and who your neighbors are influences whether or not you think closing the income gap is important.

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Income inequality and its effects has become a pressing concern for politicians across the political spectrum. But what makes people sit up and take notice of the inequality that may surround them? In new research which focuses on income diversity in New York, Scott Minkoff and Jeffrey Lyons find that those who live in areas with a greater diversity […]

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    Protected housing does not protect Chicago’s older Puerto Rican adults from the broader effects of gentrification

Protected housing does not protect Chicago’s older Puerto Rican adults from the broader effects of gentrification

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Gentrification is a much talked about topic among academics and urban planners alike, with a great deal of the discussion focusing on its effects on minority communities. But how does gentrification affect older members of such communities? Alexander Barton profiles a new study by Ivis García and Mérida M. Rúa which examines the impact of gentrification in Chicago […]

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    How the design of housing vouchers can help those on low incomes to live in neighborhoods they prefer.

How the design of housing vouchers can help those on low incomes to live in neighborhoods they prefer.

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For many in the US, the rent is still too high – more than a quarter of US renters pay more than half of their income on housing, and ten percent of this group receives government housing subsidies. In new research, Judy Geyer examines how housing vouchers influence where people choose to live. She finds that when the maximum […]

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    For low income minority women in Detroit, traveling to meet their family’s needs is a daily battle.

For low income minority women in Detroit, traveling to meet their family’s needs is a daily battle.

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In recent years, for many the city of Detroit has been a poster child for America’s rust belt decline. And while the urban core of the city has been consolidating, it still presents many challenges for those who need to travel within it. Jieun Lee, Igor Vojnovic, and Sue C. Grady explore the class and racial elements of these […]

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    Book Review: Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving by Caitlin DeSilvey

Book Review: Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving by Caitlin DeSilvey

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In Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving, Caitlin DeSilvey takes an experimental methodological approach to heritage practice, examining a series of projects and sites where the appropriate course of action may in fact be minimal intervention, if at all. While not fully convinced by the notion of ‘curated decay’, Andrew Molloy finds that DeSilvey’s self-reflexive exploration raises vital questions for the […]

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    Why we need to rethink our assumptions about urban population growth and economic prosperity

Why we need to rethink our assumptions about urban population growth and economic prosperity

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Few cities remain static – as years pass, their populations and economic fortunes rise and fall. Maxwell Hartt studied change in the largest 100 US cities over 30 years, finding that most had an overall increase or fall in population rather than experiencing a cyclical boom or bust, and that their economic fortunes were often the opposite of […]

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