Human Rights

State responsibility, Boko Haram and human rights law

Nobody has been held accountable for the ongoing kidnappings of civilians by Boko Haram. Oluwafifehan Ogunde examines Nigeria’s human rights law and asks whether the government’s decision to prioritise words over action will result in legal repercussions.

On 17 September 2018 an aid worker with the International Committee of the Red Cross, Saifura Hussaini Ahmed Khorsa, was killed in […]

Are children’s rights history?

The former Save the Children UK chief executive, Sir Mike Aaronson, reflects on the history and legacy of the organisation. In advance of the conference at LSE on Politics, Humanitarianism, and Children’s Rights, which explores the relationship between these three constructs, he asks whether we, as today’s children’s rights advocates, have the courage of our predecessors.

Do children’s rights count […]

April 1st, 2019|Human Rights|0 Comments|
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    Spirits on trial? The case of Dominic Ongwen in the International Criminal Court

Spirits on trial? The case of Dominic Ongwen in the International Criminal Court

In this article, Kristof Titeca argues that although international law claims to apply universal justice, it still seems underequipped in dealing with spirits and the supernatural, which are ironically an integral part of the lives of the many people caught up in trial, like Dominic Ongwen, a former child soldier of the LRA. 

Otim (pseudonym) is a former child soldier […]

Notes from the Field: Mob justice in Gulu

Julian Hopwood writes about an unsettling event on the field that led him to reflect on mob justice and the complicated moral and political territory it finds itself.

There was a strong smell of petrol in my car one morning back in March. I was worried that it might be a leak, before I realised what it was.

Mob justice in […]

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    Book Review: The African Union : Autocracy, Diplomacy and Peace-building in Africa by Tony Karbo and Tim Murithi

Book Review: The African Union : Autocracy, Diplomacy and Peace-building in Africa by Tony Karbo and Tim Murithi

Richard Moncrieff argues that this book is a reflection of the conditions of academic production concerning the African Union. The eagerness to offer prescription rather than push the analysis further and the absence of consideration of realities on the ground in African countries both reflect a world dominated by consultancy and multiple hatting, he says.

How should we evaluate the […]

Outcast in your own Home

 This article is part of our #LSEReturn series, exploring themes around Displacement and Return.

Through the accounts of Evelyn and Mary’s lives with the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), Jacky Atingo and Melissa Parker ask why programmes funded by humanitarian agencies have done little to protect vulnerable people.

More than 30,000 children were abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in […]

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    Displacement as Resistance in Northern Uganda: Government Abuse, Popular Protest, and the Limits of International Governance

Displacement as Resistance in Northern Uganda: Government Abuse, Popular Protest, and the Limits of International Governance

In the second article of this two-part blog series, Tessa Laing and Sara Weschler analyse the outcome of the peaceful occupation of the UN Human Rights office in Gulu, northern Uganda by Acholi farmers in July this year and what it tells us about how the UN tackles human rights abuses by governments.

Read part one of this article for […]

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    Displacement as Resistance in Northern Uganda: How 234 Rural Farmers Occupied a UN Compound to Defend Their Land

Displacement as Resistance in Northern Uganda: How 234 Rural Farmers Occupied a UN Compound to Defend Their Land

Tessa Laing and Sara Weschler provide a comprehensive account of forced displacement endured by the Acholi people for over 100 years and how one community chose to occupy the UN Human Rights office in Gulu to draw attention to land injustice being suffered at the hands of the government.

This article is part of our #LSEReturn series, exploring themes around Displacement […]

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    Women’s Rights in “Weak” States: The Promises and Pitfalls of Gender Advocacy in Transition

Women’s Rights in “Weak” States: The Promises and Pitfalls of Gender Advocacy in Transition

Milli Lake explores how and to what extent the spotlight on sexual violence has restructured judicial priorities in eastern DR Congo and South Africa.

Following a reported decline in conflict-related sexual violence in DR Congo, the UN Secretary General’s Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict recently referred to the country as its “most successful story” yet.

The Special Representative’s claim […]

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    The Trial of Hissène Habré and What it Could Mean for Justice in Africa

The Trial of Hissène Habré and What it Could Mean for Justice in Africa

Celeste Hicks explores the trial of Hissène Habré and what it could mean for future justice and accountability efforts in Africa.

The legal vagaries and judicial details of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC), which sentenced Hissène Habré to life imprisonment in 2015, was not at the top of the list of concerns of many of  the former Chadian president’s victims. What matters […]

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