Development

Eritrea: from war and oppression to peace and development

Eritrea’s brutal dictatorship has created a society with the hallmarks of one at war. Now with signs that President Isaias Afwerki has become increasingly isolated, talk has begun of a new regime. But with mistrust so high of public institutions, writes Bahlbi Malk, a recovery programme must reform more than its failing institutions and undertaken psychological reconstruction.

In the early […]

The charcoal challenge in DRC’s Virunga

The charcoal trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo has been framed as an issue of transnational organised crime, omitting the importance of the trade for local populations. Current strategies of heavy law enforcement consequently fail to gain public support, and will remain ineffective.

Virunga National Park in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was recently reopened for tourists, after […]

Senegal’s democracy is limited with or without Macky Sall

After his recent victory, Senegal’s re-elected president has shown a willingness to open a new chapter. But in order to transform the country for the better, argues Elimane Kane, the country needs more than a new president or fairer elections. The population needs a new consciousness.

Senegal has just emerged from its eleventh presidential elections. The vote, held on 24 […]

International development has a race problem

Working in Sierra Leone’s Ministry of Health and Sanitation uncovered an underlying prejudice among the white expatriate development community. Until the development sector deals with this problem, can the sort of relationship with governments needed for effective partnerships really be created?

Last week I went to a talk in Oxford about Sierra Leone’s Ebola emergency response. It was a presentation […]

Fragility and uneven aid in the African Great Lakes

The DRC’s new president brings opportunities to rethink development in the Great Lakes region. With current aid policies charged with fuelling political instability, Léopold Ghins argues the status quo is unable to bring prosperity and effective peacekeeping.

Despite decades of foreign interventions, both through peacekeeping and aid, the African Great Lakes remain one of the world’s most fragile regions. So […]

Money guards and hospital hostages in the DRC

Conducting research in new socio-economic spaces can bring unexpected challenges. For two researchers in Goma in the Democratic Republic of Congo their identities as white foreigners impacted their relation to power and authority, with ignorance of local customs interacting with privileged access to money and networks.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series with the Centre for Public Authority […]

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    A never-ending story? Cyclical mobilisation and demobilisation in the eastern DRC

A never-ending story? Cyclical mobilisation and demobilisation in the eastern DRC

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, demobilisation programmes aim to reintegrate combatants into everyday life. But there are often blurred boundaries between what is considered military and civilian and, with a less nuanced understanding, potential future security threats could go unchecked.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series with the Centre for Public Authority and International Development at LSE.

Combatants’ […]

When is Going with The Grain Making the Problem Worse?

In order to realise change, development practitioners sometimes make compromises with groups that do not always share the same ideals.  Following a recent workshop on social accountability, Tom Kirk and Annette JE Fisher reflect on the discussions held and ask when, and how, ‘going with the grain’ can make a problem worse.

 This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog […]

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    Seeing and Being Development’s ‘Other’: Representations of Africa and Diaspora Audiences

Seeing and Being Development’s ‘Other’: Representations of Africa and Diaspora Audiences

Dr Edward Ademolu outlines how his interest in the politics of visual representation particular in the development/humanitarian spheres evolved.

As a young child in the 1990s my introduction to international development was through watching the performative biennial telethon ‘Red Nose Day’ of Comic Relief, a major UK charity. This high-profile event armed with prosthetic noses, mainstream contemporary music, and […]

Book Review – Why We Lie About Aid by Pablo Yanguas

According to Thomas Kirk, this book is an engaging rallying cry to reinterpret our discourses around aid and move away from quantifying successes based solely on value for money.

Every so often you read something that brilliantly articulates an idea or issue you have been struggling with for a while but could not eloquently capture. For me, Why We Lie About Aid […]

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