Development

Money guards and hospital hostages in the DRC

Conducting research in new socio-economic spaces can bring unexpected challenges. For two researchers in Goma in the Democratic Republic of Congo their identities as white foreigners impacted their relation to power and authority, with ignorance of local customs interacting with privileged access to money and networks.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series with the Centre for Public Authority […]

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    A never-ending story? Cyclical mobilisation and demobilisation in the eastern DRC

A never-ending story? Cyclical mobilisation and demobilisation in the eastern DRC

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, demobilisation programmes aim to reintegrate combatants into everyday life. But there are often blurred boundaries between what is considered military and civilian and, with a less nuanced understanding, potential future security threats could go unchecked.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series with the Centre for Public Authority and International Development at LSE.

Combatants’ […]

When is Going with The Grain Making the Problem Worse?

In order to realise change, development practitioners sometimes make compromises with groups that do not always share the same ideals.  Following a recent workshop on social accountability, Tom Kirk and Annette JE Fisher reflect on the discussions held and ask when, and how, ‘going with the grain’ can make a problem worse.

 This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog […]

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    Seeing and Being Development’s ‘Other’: Representations of Africa and Diaspora Audiences

Seeing and Being Development’s ‘Other’: Representations of Africa and Diaspora Audiences

Dr Edward Ademolu outlines how his interest in the politics of visual representation particular in the development/humanitarian spheres evolved.

As a young child in the 1990s my introduction to international development was through watching the performative biennial telethon ‘Red Nose Day’ of Comic Relief, a major UK charity. This high-profile event armed with prosthetic noses, mainstream contemporary music, and […]

Book Review – Why We Lie About Aid by Pablo Yanguas

According to Thomas Kirk, this book is an engaging rallying cry to reinterpret our discourses around aid and move away from quantifying successes based solely on value for money.

Every so often you read something that brilliantly articulates an idea or issue you have been struggling with for a while but could not eloquently capture. For me, Why We Lie About Aid […]

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    Challenging humanitarianism beyond gender as women and women as victims #PressforProgress

Challenging humanitarianism beyond gender as women and women as victims #PressforProgress

Dorothea Hilhorst, Holly Porter and Rachel Gordon argue the lack of inclusivity in gender-targeted humanitarian aid has obscured other realities in which men and women assume different and more complex roles.

At the United Nations (UN) World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in May 2016, ‘achieving greater gender equality and greater inclusivity’ was identified as one of the five key areas of […]

Is Oxfam the Worst or the Best?

Dyan Mazurana argues that while sexual harrassment and assault of humanitarian aid workers is widespread, Oxfam Global is “one of the best international aid agencies in terms of reporting, investigating and addressing sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse of its staff”.

The sexual abuse allegations against Oxfam staff came to light because Oxfam has one the best reporting systems in the […]

February 21st, 2018|Development, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Who cares about Africa? British and American conservatisms in African development

Who cares about Africa? British and American conservatisms in African development

Stefan Andreasson examines how the Republican and Conservative parties dealt with African development since the late Cold War era. He explains why American input has been more prominent, while the British have come to resign themselves to a managed decline in relations with Africa.

 
Who cares about Africa? Does political ideology inform whether or not such care exists and how it is […]

Reading List: Most popular @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2017

It is that time of the year when we stop to take stock of the last 12 months and we are happy to present the best-read @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2016, as voted by you with your clicks. If you missed any of these, here is your opportunity to catch up!

Film Review: NGO – Nothing Going On -LSE […]

Decolonising Development Studies

Tin Hinane El Kadi explores the debates and questions around decolonising development studies.

Global calls for decolonisation in higher education have spread over recent years. The Rhodes Must Fall campaign has called for statues of the imperialist Cecil Rhodes to be torn down at the University of Cape Town in South Africa and the University of Oxford in the UK. This decolonisation initiative […]

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