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    New tricks for an old hand: getting Brexit through Parliament

New tricks for an old hand: getting Brexit through Parliament

In this blog, Benjamin Martill and Leo von Bülow-Quirk argue there’s still a way to reach agreement on a Brexit deal—but it’ll require Parliament to work in a whole new way.

Here we go again. Yesterday the ‘mother of all parliaments’ inflicted the mother of all defeats on the government, rejecting Theresa May’s painstakingly negotiated withdrawal agreement by a huge majority […]

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    Climate change is a likely area of successful cooperation between the EU and the UK after Brexit

Climate change is a likely area of successful cooperation between the EU and the UK after Brexit

Alexandra-Maria Bocse (LSE) assesses the degree to which the EU’s participation in the global climate regime will be affected by Brexit. First, the EU will lose a member that has pushed for higher standards of climate protection at home and EU level. This might have a negative impact on the EU’s climate policies. Second, the EU will lose an innovative […]

LSE Brexit in 2018: the editors’ pick

December 31st, 2018|#LSEThinks, Featured|0 Comments|

LSE Brexit’s 2018 holiday reading list

December 24th, 2018|#LSEThinks, Featured|1 Comment|
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    There is no left-wing case for Brexit: 21st century socialism requires transnational organization

There is no left-wing case for Brexit: 21st century socialism requires transnational organization

The contribution of traditional social democracy to the consolidation of neoliberalism in Europe illustrates the difficulties of developing a nationalist left alternative in the contemporary capitalist state, argues Lea Ypi. Contemporary socialism requires new ways of organising and must be transnational. Using the British case, she explains why neither Remain nor Leave fully capture the demands of the left.

The […]

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    The Brexit mess shows how the UK’s referendum process could learn from California’s ballot initiatives

The Brexit mess shows how the UK’s referendum process could learn from California’s ballot initiatives

Last weeks have seen the UK Parliament knee-deep in Brexit related debates, all of which stem from 2016’s non-binding referendum. Erik P. Bucy writes the current rancour in the UK over Brexit is reminiscent of California’s difficult experience with its anti-immigration Proposition 187, which had been strategically pushed by a Republican Governor in 1994. He argues that the UK may have […]

December 20th, 2018|#LSEThinks, Featured|0 Comments|

Europe Beyond Brexit: what’s next?

While the scheduled date of Brexit is fast approaching, the British public debate, which is focused on the current state of the exit negotiations and the outlooks for the future relationship, mainly represents the UK’s point of view. This is why the LSE European Institute and the LSE School of Public Policy jointly hosted a panel event aimed at […]

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    No-confidence vote may help May overcome her domestic opposition

No-confidence vote may help May overcome her domestic opposition

Benjamin Martill argues the no-confidence vote brought by Tory backbenchers may help Theresa May overcome some of her domestic opposition, although the barriers to the withdrawal agreement passing Parliament will remain high: the EU will not reopen negotiations and the parliamentary arithmetic is still unlikely to add up.

Theresa May had looked all but certain to lose the parliamentary vote […]

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    A way out of the Brexit chaos? Parliament should install a national government

A way out of the Brexit chaos? Parliament should install a national government

Is there a way out of the Brexit chaos, asks Iain Begg (LSE)? With still no solution in sight for Brexit, the time has come for a more imaginative approach, he writes. The UK’s politicians need to look beyond partisan positions and tactical manoeuvring to find a way of reconciling the many trade-offs – democratic as well as economic – […]

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    A second referendum: what question to ask – and when to do it?

A second referendum: what question to ask – and when to do it?

The current position in the UK with regard to Brexit is said to be a constitutional crisis. Andrea Biondi and Maria Kendrick (Kings College London) consider two of the most fundamental issues (the others being informatively discussed by the Constitution Unit) affecting the legal viability of holding such a referendum: the question and the timescale.

The Withdrawal Agreement was due to […]