#LSEThinks

By LSE authors

Did we ever really understand how the EU works?

Despite its long membership, Britain has seriously failed to grasp the way the EU works, writes N Piers Ludlow (LSE). Many of the stickiest points in the Brexit negotiations, including the Northern Ireland backstop and the decision to trigger Article 50 so early, reveal a fundamental misunderstanding of how the bloc operates.

The United Kingdom ought to have started the Brexit […]

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    The 2019 European Parliament: the far right International is here – when will the left wake up?

The 2019 European Parliament: the far right International is here – when will the left wake up?

The political forces most hostile to European integration are also the only ones to have formulated a common vision for Europe, writes Lea Ypi (LSE). Now is the time to bring the various local social justice campaigns together, and put them at the service of a renewed political project.

As Marine Le Pen, Matteo Salvini, Geert Wildeers and other far-right […]

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    Global Britain? Replacing the EU with the Commonwealth is fanciful

Global Britain? Replacing the EU with the Commonwealth is fanciful

Replacing participation in the European Union with enhanced cooperation at the Commonwealth is not a viable option for the United Kingdom, writes Rishi Gulati (LSE). It is a triumph of hope over reality. This much is made clear by a leaked document from the Commonwealth reported on by the BBC on 13 June 2019 demonstrating that the institution needs significant and systemic reforms […]

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    Who really won the UK European elections? A tale of two stories, and what happens next

Who really won the UK European elections? A tale of two stories, and what happens next

The results of the European Parliament elections in the UK are out, and while various politicians have tried hard to frame the result as telling an ‘obvious’ story, it is probably because interpreting the outcome depends a lot on how you read the 2014 results, explain Michael Bruter and Sarah Harrison.

The European Parliament election of 2019 is the story […]

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    Electoral hostility: politically driven conflicts between people are undermining democracy

Electoral hostility: politically driven conflicts between people are undermining democracy

A study of the 2019 European Parliament election campaign indicates that electoral hostility is no longer the reserve of public attitudes towards political elites, but is also manifesting animosity between citizens, writes Sarah Harrison (LSE). She finds that people are now less willing to accept sacrifices to protect others in the community whom they disagree with. This dynamic puts into questions […]

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    Less energy for the energy sector? There is major disruption ahead to both the UK and the EU energy markets

Less energy for the energy sector? There is major disruption ahead to both the UK and the EU energy markets

Alexandra-Maria Bocse (LSE) looks at the impact of Brexit on investment in renewables, on energy efficiency and on connections between the EU and the UK energy markets. She writes that the negative implications of Brexit for the UK will require policy responses.

The uncertainty surrounding Brexit made the UK a less attractive market for renewable energy investors. The business and […]

How the post-Brexit pound has hurt Britain’s workers

The unexpected result of the Brexit referendum, working through the rapid depreciation of sterling, has hurt British workers. Rui Costa, Swati Dhingra and Stephen Machin (LSE) show that the big drop in the value of the pound caused a rise in import prices, which has led to a fall in both wages and training for workers employed in the […]

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    The dawn of a Europe of many visions: what the election manifestos tell us about the conflict, paralysis and progress ahead

The dawn of a Europe of many visions: what the election manifestos tell us about the conflict, paralysis and progress ahead

Last week’s European elections may have been the dawn of a Europe of many visions. At least this is what the European election manifestos tell us about the potentiality for conflict, paralysis, and progress ahead, write Luke Cooper, Roch Dunin-Wąsowicz, and Niccolò Milanese, in a report produced by the LSE Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, where they argue that Brexit has killed […]

WTO rules OK? Not any more

Many Brexiteers see the WTO as a desirable framework for the UK’s trade. Donald Trump dislikes it. Steven Woolcock (LSE) explains how the WTO has been undermined by outdated rules, US trade policy and China’s support for its own industries. It looks like rather a poor alternative to negotiating agreements with major markets.

Two developments are seen as evidence of […]

Maastricht debate 2019: a second scramble for Africa?

The EU, the UK and China all want to pursue interests in Africa. In a post-Brexit world, this may lead to even greater rivalry. To prevent a neo-colonial “scramble for Africa,” the EU should now follow Fran’s Timmermans’ proposal and “embrace Africa as a sister continent”. It may be the only player that could convincingly do so. Kate Hall […]