#LSEThinks

By LSE authors

How will Brexit affect the EP elections in the EU27?

Brexit is not a major issue for people voting in the European Parliament elections in the rest of the EU. But Britain’s struggle to leave the EU may make staying in the bloc more attractive, says Sara Hagemann (LSE). Nonetheless, given the uncertainty surrounding the UK’s departure, Eurosceptic parties may be able to exploit hopes that a favourable exit […]

LSE Continental Breakfast 16: Europe for the many? Realising left-wing reforms in the EU

Can the EU deliver on the left-wing promise of a “Europe for the many”? The LSE’s 16th Continental Breakfast addressed four key left-wing policy areas: macroeconomic policy, local socioeconomic development, public services, and green growth. One dilemma arose time and again in the discussion – whether left-wing parties should push for incremental or radical change in the EU. Kira […]

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    Interview with Christian Lequesne: there will be no more Brexit extensions after Halloween

Interview with Christian Lequesne: there will be no more Brexit extensions after Halloween

Christian Lequesne is a professor of European politics at the Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po) and one of the foremost French commentators on UK politics. He spoke to Roch Dunin-Wąsowicz, at the time of the second Article 50 extension granted to the UK, about the EU27’s negotiating objectives, Macron’s stance on Brexit, and France’s vision for the future of the […]

Not always so Eurosceptic: Britain and the inter-war dream of European unity

Britain has not always been reluctant to countenance European unity. Tommaso Milani (LSE) recalls the intellectual impetus for a European community in the inter-war period, which was driven by a desire for peace and, from some, the left-wing case for a socialist European economy.

As history is written and rewritten in constant dialogue with the present, Brexit is likely to […]

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    Permalink A 1921 German poster urges Upper Silesia to 'stay German'. Image: <a href=Wikimedia Commons (Muzem Historii Katowic). Public domain" />Gallery

    Brexit lessons from the Silesian backstop of 1919-25

Brexit lessons from the Silesian backstop of 1919-25

The Northern Irish backstop proposal is complex – but it is not unprecedented, writes Thea Don-Siemion (LSE). The Treaty of Versailles established arrangements to prevent a hard border between Germany and Poland in Silesia. It failed, becoming a flashpoint in the relationship between the two countries. Even a permanent backstop is a poorer guarantor of peace in Northern Ireland […]

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    Is Brexit the will of the people? The answer is not quite that simple

Is Brexit the will of the people? The answer is not quite that simple

The Prime Minister, Theresa May, has repeatedly asserted that Brexit is “the will of the British people”, and that the government, therefore, has a duty to “deliver” it. But is Brexit really the will of the British people? Christian List (LSE) takes a critical look at this question.

The Prime Minister assumes that “the will of the people” is to […]

From cautious member to bold leader? The Netherlands and EU after Brexit

Brexit has caused concern in Europe about further defections, but Lisa ten Brinke (Dahrendorf Forum, LSE) argues it has had the opposite effect – at least in the Netherlands.

The causes and consequences of Brexit have been analysed from many angles—from the EU’s internal struggles to the rise of populism and the end of Western hegemony. Less attention has been paid, however, to the position […]

Quick take: the EU’s irrational position on the Brexit backstop

The EU would apparently prefer the UK to fall into no deal rather than compromising on the Northern Ireland backstop, writes Simon Witney (LSE). The stand-off could end if the EU were prepared to accept a second-best alternative.

The European Union’s position in the Brexit negotiations, if one takes it at face value, is self-evidently irrational. It is remarkable that […]

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    Permalink The Erasmus Student Network meets for a summit in Krakow, March 2019. Photo: <a href=Erasmus Student Network via a >a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/esnint/40404688873/in/album-72157679329907708/">CC-BY-NC 2.0 licence" />Gallery

    The success of Erasmus+ will be very difficult to replicate

The success of Erasmus+ will be very difficult to replicate

In the general confusion surrounding Britain’s relationship with the EU, the Erasmus+ programme has been a casualty. Anne Corbett (LSE) looks at the programme’s origins in the 1950s and the lessons that Erasmus’s slow journey to fruition have for any ‘Erasmus Lite’ replacement.

As Britain heads for its still unknown Brexit destination, concern about the EU programme Erasmus+ is growing. […]

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    Britain’s wartime generation are almost as pro-EU as millennials

Britain’s wartime generation are almost as pro-EU as millennials

There is a significant difference in opinion on Brexit between different age groups in the UK, with older citizens generally exhibiting more negative attitudes toward the EU than younger ones. But as Kieran Devine writes, while over 65s are typically treated as a single category in opinion polls, there are substantial generational differences within this group, with those who […]