#LSEThinks

By LSE authors

How the story of Britain and Europe began

How has the story of Britain and Europe begun? Was Brexit inevitable? In this blog, Lindsay Aqui (Cambridge/LSE) attempts to answer these and other questions as the UK’s protracted departure from the European Union enters yet another phase.

As we near what may be the end of the UK’s membership of the EU, it seems timely to reflect on how that […]

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    UK economy since the Brexit vote: slower GDP growth, lower productivity, and a weaker pound

UK economy since the Brexit vote: slower GDP growth, lower productivity, and a weaker pound

Evidence of the UK’s economic performance since the EU Referendum is clear: GDP growth has slowed down, productivity has suffered, the pound has depreciated and purchasing power has gone down, and investments have declined. In this blog, Josh De Lyon and Swati Dhingra (LSE Centre for Economic Performance) argue that the impact of the Brexit vote on the health of […]

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    Article 50 extension: Why time for the UK to live through its crisis is also good for Europe

Article 50 extension: Why time for the UK to live through its crisis is also good for Europe

The UK’s departure is a strategic and historic disaster for the EU, writes Rosa Balfour (German Marshall Fund). Britain will suffer the most materially, but for the EU Brexit will represent a sharp fracture in a process of relative decline. The truth is that the whole continent is going through a major political crisis and the UK is pioneering it […]

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    Germany will not allow Brexit to compromise EU core principles 

Germany will not allow Brexit to compromise EU core principles 

The powerful role of German business was brought into the Brexit debate during the referendum campaign by Leave campaigners as they brushed off predictions of hampered trade with the EU in a post-Brexit world. They argued that German carmakers would surely make their interests heard. But as John Ryan (LSE) argues, this did not happen and Germany will not […]

Is Brexit a contest between low-earning Leavers and high-earning Remainers?

A common interpretation of Brexit maintains that there was a clear divide between more affluent and less well-off citizens when it came to supporting EU membership. Is this backed up by the available evidence? Mathias Koenig-Archibugi and Miriam Sorace (LSE) present a new way of looking at the question.

A popular narrative of Brexit pits “working-class Leavers” against “middle-class […]

The EU is a default empire of nations in denial

Wolfgang Streeck argued last week on LSE Brexit that the EU was a ‘liberal empire’ that is about to fall. Peter Ramsay (LSE) suggests that the EU is a very particular type of empire, one that has arisen from the political decline of the nations that comprise it, and that this explains the tortured politics of Brexit.

 

Wolfgang Streeck does the […]

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    How to determine the ‘will of the people’: a mathematical view

How to determine the ‘will of the people’: a mathematical view

Mathematician Bernhard von Stengel (LSE) uses game theory to consider how a second Brexit referendum with more than two choices could be run, and how the counting-rule chosen for any multiple-choice ballot can determine the outcome.

If you favour a second referendum on Brexit (a prospect that is now, in early 2019, receding), you should not only think of what you should […]

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    Brexit chaos and brinksmanship may lead to Article 50 extension

Brexit chaos and brinksmanship may lead to Article 50 extension

An extension of Article 50 is widely mooted in Westminster and Brussels, writes John Ryan (LSE). What may look like a relatively easy alternative step in order to avoid a cliff edge No Deal Brexit on first sight, is in fact a much more complex matter – not unlike many other details of Brexit.

If MPs reject a No Deal […]

Brexit poses major risks to social policy in the UK

Kitty Stewart (LSE) looks at the implications of Brexit for health, education and housing, as well as workers’ rights, and concludes that it poses major risks to  social policy. While some of these may have been apparent to voters, it is difficult to imagine that they anticipated the scale and breadth of some of the less direct effects.

What will Brexit […]

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    No majority in Parliament for a second referendum – for now

No majority in Parliament for a second referendum – for now

With deadlock in Westminster and both parties bitterly divided on Europe, it may be the case that the only way out of the Brexit impasse is another vote in which May’s deal is put to the people. At present, however, there is no majority in Parliament for such a referendum, writes John Ryan (LSE). This, though, may change very […]