EU Withdrawal Bill

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    The prorogation ruling has strengthened the political accountability of those in power

The prorogation ruling has strengthened the political accountability of those in power

Robert Brett Taylor (University of Aberdeen) examines the UK Supreme Court’s ruling on the prorogation case. He explains what it means for ministerial responsibility, constitutional conventions, and Parliament’s ability to politically check government. Political accountability has been strengthened, rather than weakened, by the Court’s decision, he argues.

On 24 September 2019, the UK Supreme Court handed down its judgment in Cherry/Miller (No.2).  […]

Brexit crunch time: do all paths lead to an early election?

There are plausible reasons to think that an early election is likely, writes Hudson Meadwell (McGill University). In this blog, he outlines the possible paths that lead there. The two most likely paths to an early election, in his view, are new deal-ratification-withdraw-early election or no new deal-withdraw-early election.

I expect that prorogation will eventually be ruled lawful (if not constitutional). Jonathan Sumption, a former […]

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    Long read | The EU Settlement Scheme needs to be a declaratory registration system

Long read | The EU Settlement Scheme needs to be a declaratory registration system

In the first part of this blog, Stijn Smismans explained why the government’s EU Settlement Scheme will lead to Windrush type scenarios and how a declaratory registration scheme can overcome that problem. In part two, he first sets out what an effective declaratory registration system will look like. He then identifies what is probably the best legislative vehicle to introduce […]

Since the referendum, the EU has set the Commons agenda

The continuing stand-off in the House of Commons is a complex mélange of partisan party competition, constitutional and territorial politics and personal ambition, and can be difficult to untangle, argues Hudson Meadwell (McGill University). How should we go about figuring out what is going on, and how can we provide some structure by which to think about the state of […]

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    Only a new unity government can effectively avert a no-deal Brexit

Only a new unity government can effectively avert a no-deal Brexit

If the UK is not to crash out of the European Union with no deal, Jonathan Boston (LSE) argues that the previous one-party political control of the executive will need to be temporarily suspended. There is a clear majority view of the House of Commons that any withdrawal from the EU must be an agreed and orderly one, with clear succession […]

Very little time is left for Parliament to scrutinise Brexit statutory instruments

The Hansard Society has been tracking how many of the 800-1000 statutory instruments the government says it needs to deliver Brexit have been laid before Parliament. With only four months to go, only 21% have reached the Houses – leaving MPs and peers with very little time to scrutinise them, writes Joel Blackwell (Hansard Society).

There are just 127 days […]

EU law is not a thing we simply leave behind on Brexit day

The former DExEU minister Steve Baker celebrated the new web archive of EU law to be maintained by the National Archives as Britain becomes a ‘self-governing nation again’. Joelle Grogan (Middlesex University) writes that EU law will continue to play a role in legal decisions, and the changes the government intends to make will not all receive parliamentary scrutiny.
Anyone interested […]

The meaningful vote explained in sticky notes

What does the Commons vote on a meaningful vote mean? Joelle Grogan (Middlesex University, left) and Georgia Price explain.

 

 

This post represents the views of the authors and not those of the Brexit blog, nor the LSE.

Joelle Grogan is a Lecturer in Law at Middlesex University.

 

Are smaller parties denied a voice in Parliament’s Brexit debates?

The EU Withdrawal Bill’s return to the Commons saw SNP MPs protest about their voices having been excluded from the Brexit debate. Louise Thompson (University of Surrey) explains how parliamentary procedures can indeed restrict debate for smaller opposition parties, and considers whether something ought to be done about it.
Following the first session of the EU Withdrawal Bill’s return to the Commons, […]

What are the legal aspects of ‘packing’ the Lords with Brexit-friendly peers?

The recent string of government defeats in the House of Lords over amendments to the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill has reignited the debate over the role of the Lords in a modern democracy. The Daily Mail published a characteristically trenchant headline suggesting that we should “pull the plug” on the “traitors in ermine”. With 12 new peers just announced […]