Exit negotiations

Long read | Brexit is an English problem

Brexit is driven less by contextual and conjunctural factors than by history and structure, writes Hudson Meadwell (McGill University). It is not the short-term dynamics of the referendum campaign or the machinations of pre- and post-referendum party politics, or the current state of public opinion that need to be accounted for in understanding Brexit, both as event and process in British and […]

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    Why Peterborough matters: electoral preferences are now driven by Brexit identities

Why Peterborough matters: electoral preferences are now driven by Brexit identities

In the end, the parliamentary arithmetic has not changed. In the first-ever by-election propelled by the recall of an MP under the eponymous act passed in 2015, Labour narrowly managed to cling to the constituency gained from the Conservatives in 2017 and to fend off the challenge of the Brexit Party. Should we, then, just forget about the vote […]

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    The rise and fall of Northern Ireland’s voice in Brexit negotiations

The rise and fall of Northern Ireland’s voice in Brexit negotiations

To the surprise of many, Northern Ireland, through the DUP, has been the silent majority shareholder in the Brexit negotiations to date. Their influence is remarkable because, in practice, they have no direct role in the negotiations. In this blog, Sylvia de Mars (Newcastle Law School) describes the rise and fall of Northern Ireland’s importance in Brexit negotiations.

The Article 50 […]

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    The European Parliament after Brexit: what would it look like?

The European Parliament after Brexit: what would it look like?

 

 

 

The 2019 European Parliament elections are now over. While the final results have not been published for all EU countries and the precise membership of the European political groups may still evolve, the outcome of the elections have confirmed the key expectations discussed in our previous blog post. In particular, as many commentators pointed out after the elections, […]

Irish unification is a solution to the border conundrum

Addressing the Irish border question has been at the centre of Brexit. Proposed solutions to the issue have divided not just the UK and the EU, but also the UK government and Parliament, and the two main political parties in Northern Ireland. These polarised approaches have resulted in delays to the Brexit process. Given the current political impasse, a […]

Book Review: Understanding Brexit: A Concise Introduction

Tim Oliver’s brilliant new book, Understanding Brexit – A Concise Introduction, leads us through the byzantine complexities of the European Union and the options for how the Brexit process may unfold. It is a valuable resource for teachers and students, especially those interested in a Brexit textbook. In it Oliver tells us that that Brexit provides a window onto questions about British […]

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    Permalink A 1921 German poster urges Upper Silesia to 'stay German'. Image: <a href=Wikimedia Commons (Muzem Historii Katowic). Public domain" />Gallery

    Brexit lessons from the Silesian backstop of 1919-25

Brexit lessons from the Silesian backstop of 1919-25

The Northern Irish backstop proposal is complex – but it is not unprecedented, writes Thea Don-Siemion (LSE). The Treaty of Versailles established arrangements to prevent a hard border between Germany and Poland in Silesia. It failed, becoming a flashpoint in the relationship between the two countries. Even a permanent backstop is a poorer guarantor of peace in Northern Ireland […]

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    Is Brexit the will of the people? The answer is not quite that simple

Is Brexit the will of the people? The answer is not quite that simple

The Prime Minister, Theresa May, has repeatedly asserted that Brexit is “the will of the British people”, and that the government, therefore, has a duty to “deliver” it. But is Brexit really the will of the British people? Christian List (LSE) takes a critical look at this question.

The Prime Minister assumes that “the will of the people” is to […]

Is Brexit a constitutional crisis, or a political one? The answer matters

Even now, with Brexit consuming Parliament, the question of whether we are suffering a constitutional or a political crisis is important, write Anand Menon and Alan Wager (The UK in a Changing Europe). Political crises are generally short-lived; constitutional crises represent a challenge to the system itself. A general election might be enough to push a deal through the […]

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    The Executive vs Parliament: Backbenchers now control Brexit

The Executive vs Parliament: Backbenchers now control Brexit

As the clock continues to run down the major foreign policy fiasco of Brexit remains unresolved. We still do not know what Brexit will look like, how exactly we will get there, or whether it will happen at all. In light of recent developments, it is now worth revisiting the question, who really has control of Brexit? The Commons’ backbenchers now […]