No deal

Long read: Is Brexit the English reaction to devolution?

Did asymmetrical devolution in the United Kingdom engage the English nation in ways that might help to explain the contribution of English nationalism to the Brexit vote? There seems to be some agreement that English nationalism indeed contributed to Brexit, writes Hudson Meadwell (McGill University). However, he argues, those who take this line are less agreed on how and when the contemporary […]

Northern Ireland depends on the EU’s fluid borders for survival

The prospect of a Brexit deal has foundered on the issue of the Northern Ireland border. Duncan Morrow (Ulster University) explains why the delicate relationship between Ireland and its dysfunctional neighbour depended on the EU’s fluid borders to survive. Any effort to ‘do’ Brexit on Johnson-DUP terms means that devolution in Northern Ireland will ‘die’, forcing an unpopular Westminster […]

Boris Johnson’s alternative to the backstop explained

Since Theresa May’s Lancaster House speech, the position of the UK government has been that the UK should be outside the single market and the customs union after Brexit. At the same time, the UK government has committed to protecting the Good Friday Agreement by not accepting any physical infrastructure at the Irish land border. As a result, the […]

We are still perilously close to Hailsham’s ‘elective dictatorship’

In the 1970s, Lord Hailsham warned that Britain was in danger of sinking into an ‘elective dictatorship’ because of the vulnerability of its constitutional arrangements. Julian Petley (Brunel University London) says his warning, which was aimed at the left, is more relevant than ever as Boris Johnson’s government tries to impose its will on Parliament.

Not only did Boris Johnson attempt […]

September 30th, 2019|Featured, No deal, UK politics|0 Comments|
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    The prorogation ruling has strengthened the political accountability of those in power

The prorogation ruling has strengthened the political accountability of those in power

Robert Brett Taylor (University of Aberdeen) examines the UK Supreme Court’s ruling on the prorogation case. He explains what it means for ministerial responsibility, constitutional conventions, and Parliament’s ability to politically check government. Political accountability has been strengthened, rather than weakened, by the Court’s decision, he argues.

On 24 September 2019, the UK Supreme Court handed down its judgment in Cherry/Miller (No.2).  […]

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    Permalink The Rebecca Riots pictured in the Illustrated London News, 1843. Image: <a href=Wikimedia Commons. Public domain" />Gallery

    A no-deal Brexit would be very tough for farmers – but will the public sympathise?

A no-deal Brexit would be very tough for farmers – but will the public sympathise?

Upland farmers face losing more than a third of their income in the event of a no-deal Brexit, says Richard Byrne (Harper Adams University). In the past, some farmers have taken direct action when government and supermarket policies have threatened their income – but given the (albeit limited) financial support they can expect to receive, they may find it […]

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    Parliament’s role in the Brexit process: parallels with Israel and the Knesset

Parliament’s role in the Brexit process: parallels with Israel and the Knesset

The suspension of Parliament in a ‘no-written constitution’ legal context has left the UK in constitutional limbo. In this blog, Solon Solomon offers some thoughts on the Israeli constitutional experience. He argues that Parliament should have a substantial role in the Brexit process, let alone be permitted to sit in the first place.

On September 11, the Scottish Court of Session, Scotland’s […]

Prorogation of Parliament: the two court rulings explained

Martin Brenncke (Aston Law School) explains the difference between the two high court rulings regarding the prorogation of Parliament. 
The Prime Minister‘s decision to advise the Queen to prorogue Parliament is a political decision. It is not subject to judicial review by the courts. Whether or not the timing and duration of prorogation constitutes an abuse of power by the […]

No Deal would destroy Britain’s international reputation

How will Britain’s power in the world look after a no-deal exit? A chaotic exit from the EU would certianly destroy the UK’s international reputation, argues Nicholas Westcott (SOAS).

One thing you can say about much of the British media – they don’t let contact with the outside world sully their views on the Brexit debate. Weeks assiduously reading the Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Daily […]

Proponents of the new Bill to stop No Deal face a significant dilemma over Queen’s Consent

MPs opposed to a no-deal Brexit have now published their Bill. Robert Craig (LSE) explains why the existence of Queen’s Consent means that they face a complex legal Catch-22 in their efforts to stop the Prime Minister. This post has been updated after the MPs’ bill was made public.

MPs who wish to prevent No Deal have decided that their […]