UK politics

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    Indicative votes in the House of Commons: no substantive consensus but some meta-consensus

Indicative votes in the House of Commons: no substantive consensus but some meta-consensus

The results of the indicative votes held in the House of Commons on 27 March were greeted with a mixture of disappointment and ridicule. While the lack of a majority for all of the eight options under consideration shows that Parliament is deeply divided about the substantial decisions regarding the future course of the Brexit process, there is a […]

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    A Brexit Assembly offers a way of overcoming the current deadlock

A Brexit Assembly offers a way of overcoming the current deadlock

Brexit needs its own dedicated assembly, a Brexit Assembly, argues Hjalte Lokdam (LSE). The Brexit process has revealed the difficulty of addressing a question of such extraordinary constitutional and societal significance within the ordinary Parliamentary process. A Brexit Assembly of extraordinary representatives dedicated only to Brexit offers a way of overcoming the current deadlock.

As events over the last weeks and months […]

A five-point plan to solve the Brexit imbroglio

National humiliation, constitutional crisis, shambles, chaos, delusional and (for the German tabloid, Bild) ‘Brexokalypse Now?’: these are merely a sprinkling of the unflattering terms used to describe the unfolding drama of Brexit. With the House of Commons now embarked on its eleventh-hour attempt to find a way to resolve matters, this contribution by Iain Begg (LSE) puts forward a […]

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    What ‘cultural backlash’? Brexit is a product of nationalist ideology

What ‘cultural backlash’? Brexit is a product of nationalist ideology

What’s cultural about the ‘culture wars’? In this blog, Charles Leddy-Owen (University of Portsmouth) discusses Brexit and nationalist politics. He claims that the conflation of culture with nationalism is not only simplistic but also problematic as far as it leads us to assign unwarranted causal properties to immigration and ethnic diversity in electoral politics. In his view, Leave voters’ desire to ‘take back control’ […]

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    The left-wing case for a second referendum: Labour’s obligations to members

The left-wing case for a second referendum: Labour’s obligations to members

The Labour Party’s leadership has been reluctant to take steps towards seeking a second referendum. Now is the time to break the latest Brexit deadlock by honouring the party’s conference commitments and by sharing responsibility with members, argues Lea Ypi (LSE). She discusses what a second referendum ought to be about.

In assessing the left-wing case for a second EU referendum it […]

Putting the question back to the people is the only option

Having rejected the only Brexit deal available, again, the idea that the UK government is capable of reaching a satisfactory outcome regarding the British electorate’s decision in July 2016 to leave the EU is laughable. The only solution is to return to the people for a second referendum, writes Michael John Williams (New York University) – offering voters a choice […]

How the story of Britain and Europe began

How has the story of Britain and Europe begun? Was Brexit inevitable? In this blog, Lindsay Aqui (Cambridge/LSE) attempts to answer these and other questions as the UK’s protracted departure from the European Union enters yet another phase.

As we near what may be the end of the UK’s membership of the EU, it seems timely to reflect on how that […]

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    UK economy since the Brexit vote: slower GDP growth, lower productivity, and a weaker pound

UK economy since the Brexit vote: slower GDP growth, lower productivity, and a weaker pound

Evidence of the UK’s economic performance since the EU Referendum is clear: GDP growth has slowed down, productivity has suffered, the pound has depreciated and purchasing power has gone down, and investments have declined. In this blog, Josh De Lyon and Swati Dhingra (LSE Centre for Economic Performance) argue that the impact of the Brexit vote on the health of […]

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    Article 50 extension: Why time for the UK to live through its crisis is also good for Europe

Article 50 extension: Why time for the UK to live through its crisis is also good for Europe

The UK’s departure is a strategic and historic disaster for the EU, writes Rosa Balfour (German Marshall Fund). Britain will suffer the most materially, but for the EU Brexit will represent a sharp fracture in a process of relative decline. The truth is that the whole continent is going through a major political crisis and the UK is pioneering it […]

Is Brexit a contest between low-earning Leavers and high-earning Remainers?

A common interpretation of Brexit maintains that there was a clear divide between more affluent and less well-off citizens when it came to supporting EU membership. Is this backed up by the available evidence? Mathias Koenig-Archibugi and Miriam Sorace (LSE) present a new way of looking at the question.

A popular narrative of Brexit pits “working-class Leavers” against “middle-class […]