Monthly Archives: March 2019

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    Hacking Life: Systematized Living and its Discontents – Book Review

Hacking Life: Systematized Living and its Discontents – Book Review

Hacking Life: Systematized Living and its Discontents. Joseph M. Reagle, Jr. MIT Press. 2019.

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We seem to live in a world in which we face ever-greater pressures to perform to the maximum of our abilities, while at the same time technological advances allow us to monitor, quantify and analyse the world in unprecedented detail. It is most […]

March 31st, 2019|Book Review|0 Comments|
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    Non-performing loans are still hovering over the European banking union

Non-performing loans are still hovering over the European banking union

The assessment of credit risk is a critical part of the macro-prudential analysis, with the aggregate non-performing loan (NPL) ratio serving as a proxy for the economy-wide probability of default of the banking sector’s overall loan exposure. High NPL ratios affect banks’ balance sheets and profitability, overall slowing down economic growth. Therefore, the factors driving NPL ratios in different […]

Why we need to incubate unicorn entrepreneurs, not ideas

The venture and innovation worlds are focused on idea-based venture development. They spend money on incubators and very-early-stage venture capital (VC) seed funds in hopes of building giant ventures from seemingly promising ideas and technologies. But is this wasted capital? Can angels, incubators, venture developers and universities see potential before it is proven? Or can they show more results […]

Introducing valueism and social contract accounting

In her final article at the Financial Times, business editor Sarah Gordon summarises what she learned over 20 years and concludes, “Many businesses are badly run, but business is not bad”. It is a pretty damning conclusion, supported by the large list of examples she offers. Her conclusion does not surprise me. In my past writings I have often referred […]

The UK economy is hostage to Brexit political drama

European policy-makers have given Mrs May the option to push her 585-page withdrawal agreement through Parliament for the third time (!!!) around or decide what to do with Brexit by the 12th of April. In fact, the ‪EU’s decision to allow Mrs May to ‘sort out’ Brexit by the 12th of April is largely down to economic considerations. On the […]

March 27th, 2019|Economics|0 Comments|
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    Locking horns: online incivility is seen as the new normal, and it inhibits social trust

Locking horns: online incivility is seen as the new normal, and it inhibits social trust

Have you ever witnessed (or been involved in) one of those endless Facebook discussions where users fight each other on sensitive issues with nonsensical arguments and rude comments filled with hate and stereotypes? How did this make you feel?

“When it’s a faceless, person-less comment, and it’s comment after comment after comment, it makes you lose faith in humanity”, once […]

Regulating mobile money: what’s at stake

In the past decade, mobile payment systems (MPS) have rapidly emerged in many developing economies, addressing several well-known gaps in the provision of financial services. MPS, also known as mobile money, has allowed consumers who are often unbanked or underbanked, to transact and to store money more efficiently, thereby reducing the costs of engaging in undertaking all transactions, including […]

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    Heading Home: Motherhood, Work and the Failed Promise of Equality – Book Review

Heading Home: Motherhood, Work and the Failed Promise of Equality – Book Review

If you are interested in this book review, LSE will be celebrating the publication of Heading Home on Tuesday 26 March 2019 with the public event, ‘Fantasies and Injuries of Motherhood and Work’. More information about this free event can be found here. 

Heading Home: Motherhood, Work and the Failed Promise of Equality. Shani Orgad. Columbia University Press. 2019.

As […]

March 24th, 2019|Book Review|2 Comments|

The impact of the Brexit vote on the economy is now clear

The impact of the Brexit vote can now begin to be evaluated with greater accuracy than previous forecasts, thanks to the emergence of new data. In the run-up to the UK’s referendum on membership of the European Union (EU) in June 2016, a number of research reports estimated the likely economic impact of Brexit (see, for example, Dhingra et […]

March 23rd, 2019|Economics|1 Comment|

‘We are ready to try a four-day working week’

Right now a general sense of uncertainty is sweeping the nation. Brexit, an obesity epidemic, the NHS at breaking point, global warming and unrealistic house prices are just some of the hurdles Britain currently faces. You only have to turn on the news to feel some major pangs of anxiety. The extreme level of chaos in our outer world […]

March 22nd, 2019|CEOs, Labour|1 Comment|
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    Should the European Central Bank issue its own digital currency?

Should the European Central Bank issue its own digital currency?

Cryptocurrencies and their potential impact on central banking have sparked a policy debate on addressing their potential risks to the banking and monetary systems. By highlighting the functional similarities between bitcoin and central bank money (CeBM) and investigating the challenges that the potential wider adoption of cryptocurrencies can pose to central banks, my working paper discusses issuing central bank […]

March 21st, 2019|Finance|0 Comments|
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    Canada’s supply management system: lessons from Britain’s Corn Laws

Canada’s supply management system: lessons from Britain’s Corn Laws

The recent controversy over Canada’s ‘supply management system’ of agricultural protection during the regional US-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement (USMCA) negotiations was a timely reminder of the entrenched protectionism in nations that retain a theoretical commitment to international ‘free trade’. It also indicates that deviations from free trade in many guises thrive in market economies where benefits are concentrated, and costs […]

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    Gutenberg’s moving type propelled Europe towards the scientific revolution

Gutenberg’s moving type propelled Europe towards the scientific revolution

Fundamental changes in information technologies have profound implications for labour markets, for the production and spread of knowledge, and for the evolution of politics and beliefs. But competition among producers also influences the use of these technologies and their impact on multiple dimensions of life. The introduction of Gutenberg’s printing press crystallised these dynamics and profoundly shaped the long-run […]

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    The possibilities and limitations of the emerging organisational spirituality movement

The possibilities and limitations of the emerging organisational spirituality movement

Interest in the role of spirituality in organisational life has been growing rapidly in the past few decades. Numerous books and articles have explored the benefits of spirituality and religion for the effectiveness, well-being and ethicality of the modern workplace. There is both an expanding academic discourse on the meaning of spirituality at work, as well as a related […]

March 18th, 2019|Management|0 Comments|
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    Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny – Book Review

Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny – Book Review

If you are interested in this book, you can read an LSE RB interview with Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser here. 

Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny. Sarah Banet-Weiser. Duke University Press. 2018.   

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‘In 2018, we are living in a moment in North America and Europe in which feminism has become, somewhat incredibly, popular.’ The opening line to Sarah Banet-Weiser’s […]

March 17th, 2019|Book Review|0 Comments|
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    The mandatory pay gap reporting regulation needs to go broader and deeper

The mandatory pay gap reporting regulation needs to go broader and deeper

On 4 April, the second round of gender pay gap reporting will take place for English, Scottish and Welsh businesses and voluntary sector organisations with 250 or more employees (30 March for public sector organisations). In the first round in 2018, around 94% of all organisations covered by the regulations reported, providing the most detailed set of information about […]

March 16th, 2019|Gender|0 Comments|
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    The office networks of people who are thinking of quitting their job

The office networks of people who are thinking of quitting their job

Numerous studies have shown that people with large networks who have many friends and work relationships are less likely to quit their job than people who only have small work-related networks. But do people who think of quitting their job change their networks at work? Do they change the people they go to for advice or seek out for […]

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    Capitalising or expensing: R&D accounting affects the amount that firms invest

Capitalising or expensing: R&D accounting affects the amount that firms invest

We examine the effect of capitalisation versus expensing on the amount of UK firms’ research and development (R&D expenditures). We focus on the years immediately before and after the UK switched from the UK Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (UK GAAP) to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) in 2005. Under UK GAAP, firms had the option to capitalise or expense […]

March 14th, 2019|Accounting|0 Comments|
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    How steam railways shaped the emerging metropolitan area of London

How steam railways shaped the emerging metropolitan area of London

Modern metropolitan areas include vast concentrations of economic activity, with Greater London and New York City today accounting for around 8.4 and 8.5 million people, respectively. These intense concentrations of population involve the transport of millions of people each day between their home and work, as surveyed in Redding and Turner (2015). Today, the London Underground alone handles around […]

Insider hacking doesn’t depend only on individuals

Insider threats pose significant risk to an organisation’s digital assets that can severely impact business objectives. According to the 2015 Vormetric insider threat report, 89 per cent of organisations surveyed believe they are at risk from insider attacks, and 55 per cent suggest privileged users pose the greatest internal threat to security of corporate data. Information security researchers have […]