Informational privacy: a precondition for democratic participation? To survive, democracies need to protect citizens’ data privacy, even against their inclinations to share information online, writes Wulf Loh.

Informational privacy: a precondition for democratic participation?

 

Rethinking privacy in the age of psychological targeting. Direct regulation of psychological targeting and privacy by design may lift from users the burden of actively protecting their privacy, write Sandra Matz, Ruth Elisabeth Appel and Michal Kosinski.

Rethinking privacy in the age of psychological targeting

 

Why it’s hard to read the privacy policies of cloud service providers. A close look at 50 cloud service providers’ privacy policies reveals lack of readability and other linguistic problems, write Lei Gao and Alisa G. Brink.

Why it’s hard to read the privacy policies of cloud service providers

We need to appreciate privacy as a value that protects social goods. In the digital era, justifying privacy based on individual autonomy is simply not sufficient, writes Marcel Becker

We need to appreciate privacy as a value that protects social goods

 

Why people need the dark web, whether they want it or not. For people to have the level of privacy they need or think they are receiving, greater protections need to be erected for them, writes Ross Bellaby.

Why people need the dark web, whether they want it or not

 

Technologies of control: we have to defend our right of refusal. Strengthening and safeguarding our right of refusal will help prevent governing technologies from getting the better of us, writes Seeta Peña Gangadharan.

Technologies of control: we have to defend our right of refusal

 

Developing a research methodology for children’s online privacy. Their understandings and capacity to consent must be taken into account in designing services, regulation and policy, write Mariya Stoilova, Rishita Nandagiri and Sonia Livingstone.

Developing a research methodology for children’s online privacy

 

 

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