Monthly Archives: February 2020

Are Filter Bubbles Real? – Book Review

Are Filter Bubbles Real? Axel Bruns. Polity. 2019.

Find this book: 

Terms like ‘filter bubbles’ and ‘echo chambers’ have transcended social media and political communication research to enter the public consciousness, being associated in particular with polarisation in today’s societies and the unexpected outcomes of recent public votes, such as the victories of Donald Trump and the Brexiteers. In short, […]

February 9th, 2020|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Brexit: mourning the economic and personal damage

Britain has left the European Union (EU). The loss I feel is almost as much as when my father died, almost a quarter of a century ago. He was 16 when he came to Britain with my grandfather, who was a South African political refugee. After completing his UK national service, he married the daughter of a Merseyside dockworker. […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The UK has the world’s 9th most resilient labour market, but things are not as rosy as they seem

The UK has the world’s 9th most resilient labour market, but things are not as rosy as they seem

UK’s labour market continues to show resilience – but all is not as rosy as it seems. A recent analysis of labour market trends by The Institute for the Future of Work reveals strengths and weaknesses that should help plans to ‘level up’ the regions. The analysis supports the case for increased devolution; ‘mega-city’ networks connecting cities with surrounding […]

February 7th, 2020|Labour|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Employees: the missing link between stakeholder capitalism’s pledges and metrics

Employees: the missing link between stakeholder capitalism’s pledges and metrics

On the eve of the World Economic Forum’s 50th annual meeting in Davos, I wrote about the need for well-intentioned corporations seeking to lead a new era of stakeholder capitalism to convincingly separate themselves from the also-ran. By the end of the week in Davos, I was pleased to see businesses race against each other to forcefully signal their […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The number of older workers is increasing fast, yet they face growing age discrimination

The number of older workers is increasing fast, yet they face growing age discrimination

The days of collecting your carriage clock and waving goodbye to your workmates of 45 years are over, particularly as more people, whether through choice or necessity, are now working into their late 60s and 70s. In the EU, about one fifth (19%) of the population is 65 or more. A 65-year-old in the United Kingdom can now expect […]

February 5th, 2020|Gender|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Retail banks are far from obsolete: they are needed more than ever in the age of data

Retail banks are far from obsolete: they are needed more than ever in the age of data

The internet has fundamentally reformed a number of industries. Newspaper publishing lost the deep moat that investment in printing presses and distribution once represented. Music publishing went the same way. Now the quantity of data that online devices can gather makes it possible to start programming useful machine learning and artificial intelligence applications. Alexa can parse your mood.

What will […]

February 4th, 2020|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

How successful leaders avoid predictable surprises

By now every reader drawn to articles like this will almost certainly have heard the acronym VUCA, so widely used these days. It was first used in 1987 and originates from the theories on leadership of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus. It is also associated with use by the U.S. Army War College following the end the cold war. […]

February 3rd, 2020|Management|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost – Book Review

Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost – Book Review

Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost. Caitlin Zaloom. Princeton University Press. 2019.

Find this book: 

Laura and Chris are the proud parents of Sam and Mark who respectively attend Western Michigan University and Grand Valley State University in the US. Whilst Sam and Mark utilise federal loans of $7,500 and $5,500 each year, Laura takes on additional nursing […]

February 2nd, 2020|Uncategorized|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    The young today may be the first cohort to experience large-scale precarity

The young today may be the first cohort to experience large-scale precarity

The 2008 crisis crystallised the trend towards ‘precarious’ labour market conditions – stagnation in earnings growth, skills under-utilisation, labour market ‘hollowing out’, and the emergence of ‘gig economy’ practices – which disproportionately affect young people. Insecure employment is not new, especially in lower-skilled occupations, although it may have reached a new peak since the crisis. Indeed, two decades ago, […]