Blog Team

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So far Blog Team has created 2324 entries.

Will transatlantic relations break down over Iran?

Tensions have grown in recent months between the EU and the United States over Iran, which was underlined at a US-backed conference on the Middle East in Poland last week that was largely sidestepped by many European governments. Cornelius Adebahr writes that the EU is right to take a more comprehensive approach to the region and resist attempts to […]

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    The euro crisis showed the limits of using market integration and free trade as vehicles for development

The euro crisis showed the limits of using market integration and free trade as vehicles for development

The crisis that hit members of the Eurozone a decade ago has often been attributed to design flaws in Europe’s Economic and Monetary Union. Drawing on a new study, Andreas Bieler, Jamie Jordan and Adam David Morton argue that this focus neglects the deeper issues that lie at the heart of European economies. Rather than simply reflecting the flawed […]

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    Book Review: The Political Economy of Italy’s Decline by Andrea Lorenzo Capussela

Book Review: The Political Economy of Italy’s Decline by Andrea Lorenzo Capussela

In The Political Economy of Italy’s Decline, Andrea Lorenzo Capussela offers an account of Italy’s current political and economic malaise, charting the evolution of the current social order from the post-war years to the aftermath of the eurocrisis. This is an erudite and compelling study, writes Dominik A. Leusder, that will be a key theoretical resource for anyone seeking to better understand Italy’s […]

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Why the EU-Japan trade deal matters for Brexit

The EU-Japan Economic Partnership Agreement entered into force at the start of this month, but it is unclear whether the UK can retain the benefits of the agreement after it leaves the EU. Han Dorussen writes that the UK risks being excluded from what Brexiteers want: a free trade area ‘beyond Europe’ and greater ‘global influence’.

On February 1st, the EU-Japan […]

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Two months of protests in Serbia – what’s next?

Since the end of 2018, anti-government protests have been held across Serbia. Maja Bjeloš explains the background to the protests, which have demanded an end to government pressure on the media, stronger protection for journalists and political opponents against violence, investigations into alleged political killings, and electoral reforms.

The President of Serbia and the country’s ruling Progressive Party (SNS), Aleksandar […]

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    Topic-modelling the 2019 European Parliament elections: The long awaited battle over the ‘soul of Europe’?

Topic-modelling the 2019 European Parliament elections: The long awaited battle over the ‘soul of Europe’?

The campaign for the next European Parliament elections in May is now entering full swing. Miriam Sorace presents a detailed analysis of the platforms of the main European Party Groups ahead of the vote and assesses what the political consequences of the election might be for the EU over the next five years.

In his speech at the December […]

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    France-Italy: Behind the crisis lies a deeper rift over Europe

France-Italy: Behind the crisis lies a deeper rift over Europe

A diplomatic row has developed between France and Italy over recent months, with tensions being raised significantly by the decision of Luigi Di Maio, Italy’s Deputy Prime Minister and leader of the Five Star Movement, to meet with representatives of the French ‘Gilets Jaunes’ protest movement. Simon Toubeau explains that at the heart of the conflict lie two radically […]

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Why has Corbyn remained so ambivalent about Brexit?

Jeremy Corbyn and Labour could potentially play a crucial role in determining how the UK’s Brexit process will develop in the runup to 29 March. But as Graham Room writes, having sat on the fence for so long, Corbyn must be feeling uncomfortable. Unless he moves swiftly to shift the impasse at Westminster he will be consigned to political […]

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The European state has become a modern Leviathan

The management of the EU budget and the role of the European Commission in the EU policy process have been key topics in debates over European integration in recent decades. César Baena and Michael Neubert argue that the growth in EU bureaucracy that has occurred during the integration process raises questions about how taxpayers’ money is being spent. But […]

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LSE IQ podcast: Should we fear the rise of the far right?

Right-wing populism is on the rise across the globe. The US, Brazil, India, Italy, Austria, Hungary and Poland have radical right-wing politicians as leaders or in government. Far right parties have also chalked up major electoral triumphs in countries like Sweden, France and Germany. And the UK’s vote to leave the EU was a decision encouraged, in part, by […]

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    Book Review: Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime by Bruno Latour

Book Review: Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime by Bruno Latour

In Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime, Bruno Latour explores the political and philosophical challenges proper to a time defined by an environmental and socio-economic crisis. Rodrigo Muñoz-González welcomes this energetic, compelling and provocative attempt to find an alternative vision to the contradictory and flawed project of modernity. 
Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime. Bruno Latour (trans. by Catherine […]

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    Why is the EU unable to adopt a binding solidarity mechanism for the distribution of asylum seekers?

Why is the EU unable to adopt a binding solidarity mechanism for the distribution of asylum seekers?

Under the so called ‘Dublin Regulation’, asylum seekers are usually deemed to be the responsibility of the country where they first entered the EU. But following the migration crisis that began in 2015, there have been efforts to reform this system given it places greater strain on countries such as Italy and Greece, who faced large inflows due to […]

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    How electoral systems affect support for populist parties in Europe

How electoral systems affect support for populist parties in Europe

Several radical right and radical left parties in Europe have seen their support increase in recent years. But how do electoral systems affect the potential for such parties to attract voters? James Downes and Edward Chan explain that while there is an assumption the radical right and left will benefit from proportional representation systems, the reality is somewhat more […]

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Who is to blame for Italy’s recession?

The Italian economy entered a recession at the end of last year, but as Adriano Cozzolino writes, there is little agreement over whether the current government, which entered office following the 2018 Italian election, should be held responsible for the economic situation. He argues that the country’s frailties stem from the systemic failures of a political economy model built […]

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    No-deal Brexit nears as May creates temporary illusion of party unity

No-deal Brexit nears as May creates temporary illusion of party unity

Recent votes in the UK Parliament prove that it is no more capable of agreeing where to go next on Brexit than the cabinet. As Theresa May creates the temporary illusion of party unity, a no-deal Brexit grows ever closer, writes John Ryan. However, the political fallout associated with the economic hit of No Deal – or any form of harder Brexit […]

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The ideal Greek everyman: Andreas Papandreou at 100

Former Greek prime minister Andreas Papandreou is widely regarded as a key figure not only in contemporary Greek history, but in 20th century European politics. On the 100th anniversary of his birth, George Kassimeris writes on the legacy of an ideal Greek everyman whose years in power were touched with national pride, but who in the end failed to […]

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    The EU as an evolving compromise between French dirigism and German ordoliberalism

The EU as an evolving compromise between French dirigism and German ordoliberalism

France and Germany are often credited with being the key driving forces behind European integration. However, as Laurent Warlouzet explains, both states have approached the integration process from distinct ideological standpoints, with French dirigism and German ordoliberalism lying at opposite ends of the economic policy spectrum. In an EU without the UK, this clash will continue to be a […]

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    Book Review: National Populism: The Revolt Against Liberal Democracy by Roger Eatwell and Matthew Goodwin

Book Review: National Populism: The Revolt Against Liberal Democracy by Roger Eatwell and Matthew Goodwin

In National Populism: The Revolt Against Liberal Democracy, Roger Eatwell and Matthew Goodwin offer a concise examination of the rise of national populism, seeking to challenge some of the established views regarding this political shift. Simon Kaye writes that while elements of the book’s analysis engage in simplification, it is nonetheless a succinct, striking and thought-provoking work. 
If you are interested in this review, you can listen to the […]

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    Austerity politics, global neoliberalism, and the official discourse within the IMF

Austerity politics, global neoliberalism, and the official discourse within the IMF

Is austerity a ‘dream come true’ for neoliberals, or did the global financial crisis force policymakers to question neoliberalism’s core principles and change direction? Focusing on speeches by members of the International Monetary Fund, Kevin Farnsworth and Zoë Irving find little to suggest that the fundamental assumptions of neoliberalism have been displaced.

It is now over ten years since the […]

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    Why the European Parliament’s campaign to increase voter turnout could do more harm than good

Why the European Parliament’s campaign to increase voter turnout could do more harm than good

Ahead of the 2019 European elections in May, the European Parliament has launched a campaign to increase voter turnout. Nils Napierala argues that while this is clearly needed given the low turnout at the last elections in 2014, the campaign runs the risk of fuelling Eurosceptic sentiments by focusing too much on the EU’s successes and not on the […]

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