David Fernández Vítores

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    Does Brexit spell the end for English as the lingua franca of the EU?

Does Brexit spell the end for English as the lingua franca of the EU?

The UK is not the only English speaking EU state, but when Ireland and Malta both joined the EU they opted to put forward Irish and Maltese as their official languages. This has led some politicians to suggest that following Brexit, English should no longer be classified as an official EU language. David Fernández Vítores writes that in practice […]

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    There are still no easy answers to whether limits should be placed on the number of official languages in EU decision-making

There are still no easy answers to whether limits should be placed on the number of official languages in EU decision-making

The EU has 24 official languages and the Member States have made a formal commitment to maintain linguistic diversity within the EU’s institutions. As David Fernández Vítores notes, however, there is wide disagreement over whether a smaller number of working languages such as English and French should be used in specific cases. He writes that while multilingualism is important […]

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France has almost entirely failed in its strategy to prevent English taking over as the lingua franca of the EU.

Prior to the accession of the United Kingdom to the European Economic Community in 1973, the French language held a privileged position as a lingua franca of the Community. David Fernández Vítores assesses the demise of the French language’s status and the failure of France to develop an effective strategy for preventing the advance of English. He notes that the […]

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