Frank Häge

  • Permalink Gallery

    Data on political attention in the Council illustrates the EU’s failure to proactively address major crises

Data on political attention in the Council illustrates the EU’s failure to proactively address major crises

When government ministers meet in the Council of the European Union, what determines the level of attention they direct toward particular policy areas and issues? Based on recent research, Frank Häge illustrates how the Council has focused on different policy areas over time. He writes that one of the most striking trends to emerge from the data is the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The Lisbon Treaty’s change to Council voting rules will have important implications for the democratic legitimacy of the EU

Many of the decisions made in the Council of the European Union are based on qualified majority voting, in which EU legislation can be passed if a certain threshold of support is met among member states. Frank Häge assesses the potential implications of the changes to qualified majority voting rules under the Lisbon Treaty, which came into force in November […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Decisions made by consensus in the Council of the European Union emerge from the coalition-building behaviour of individual governments.

Despite the use of qualified majority voting, a high percentage of decisions in the Council of the European Union are still made by consensus. Frank Häge outlines a model which can potentially explain this phenomenon. He argues that the high numbers of decisions made by consensus are in fact an unintended by-product of coalition building within the Council: states band […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share