Justice and home affairs (including immigration, asylum policies etc)

Spain’s new transparency law could become the first step into a real process of institutional regeneration.

Public scrutiny through freedom of information is a fundamental element of a well-functioning democracy, and Spain is one of only three EU nations that do not have such an access to information law. However, recent moves by the new government to introduce a transparency law could pave the way towards greater public trust of the government. José Javier Olivas and Fabrizio Scrollini […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Immigrant children in schools have a near-zero effect on the educational achievement of native born children

In a time of austerity and rising unemployment across Europe, immigration has become an increasingly hot topic. One concern, frequently brought up by the media is that the presence of immigrant children in schools may reduce the educational outcomes of native children. Using data from the Netherlands, Asako Ohinata and Jan C. van Ours have taken an in-depth look at […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The European economic crisis has coincided with a decline in press freedom in the EU.

In the half decade since the beginning of the economic crisis, global press freedom has declined, and the EU has been no exception to this trend. Reporting on a new survey on press freedom, Jennifer Dunham and Zselyke Csaky find that Greece and Hungary have experienced large declines in press freedom in recent years, with Lithuania, Latvia and Spain also seeing […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

If Europe is to tackle its demographic decline it should take lessons from the USA’s comprehensive immigration reforms.

With declining birth rates and an ageing population, Europe is facing the threat of a demographic decline by the middle of the century. Facing similar challenges, the US has recently moved to reform its immigration policies, thus allowing greater numbers of migrants to encourage growth. Sarah Wolff argues for similar reforms for European immigration policies, which until now, have been […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

As the EU gears up to reform data protection rules, the rift between individuals and companies over online personal data processing is gaping.

The EU is currently seeking to replace its nearly two decade old policy on data protection for the Internet, social networking and smartphone age. Its proposed reforms seek to deliver better data protection, legal certainty and trust, with the aim of enhancing the EU’s competitiveness. Kristina Irion and Giacomo Luchetta discuss their new report on Online Personal Data Processing and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Book Review: The Oxford Handbook of the European Union

The EU is becoming increasingly important and present in the lives of Europeans, at the same time as myths and misunderstandings about the institution and its role are on the rise. With contributions from over sixty specialists, Giulia Pastorella finds the Oxford Handbook of the European Union to be a key survey of scholarly work on the ‘unidentified political object’ […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The EU’s data protection proposals may help to revitalise fundamental privacy principles for the online age.

The European Union’s data protection framework is currently under review. Stefan Strauss argues that current proposals lean towards revitalising the value of privacy and addressing key concerns over transparency and control of personal data use. Intel has estimated that every minute approximately 640000 GB of IP data are transferred through the online universe. An increasing amount of this data is directly or indirectly linked to […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Greece, Portugal, Spain and the East European states take on less than their fair share of responsibility for EU asylum seekers.

One of the stated aims of the “2008 Policy Plan on Asylum” by the European Commission is increased ‘responsibility sharing’ between Member States with respect to asylum seekers. Luc Bovens and Günperi Sisman assess the extent to which UNHCR outcome data reflect these aims between 2006 and 2011 – from the end of the first phase of the Common European […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Terrorism is almost always morally unjustified, but it may be justified as the only way of preventing a “moral disaster”

Can terrorism ever be morally justified? Igor Primoratz writes on the nature of terrorism and whether it is possible to defend terrorist attacks in isolated cases. He argues that definitions of terrorism cannot be based on the identity of those resorting to it and must therefore be extended to include ‘state terrorism’. He concludes that while terrorism is almost always […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The costs of the UK’s opt-out of EU justice and policing measures would far exceed any benefits.

The UK government has indicated that it would like to pursue an opt-out of EU measures on police cooperation and criminal justice in 2014, in order to ‘repatriate’ criminal justice back to the UK. This week a UK House of Lords joint committee reported on its investigation of the opt-out, concluding that it could have negative repercussions. Alicia Hinarejos gave evidence […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The evidence suggests that the conflict in Chechnya was not a major factor in the motivation of the Boston bombers

Since last week’s bombings in Boston and the subsequent manhunt, much has been speculated about the motivations of the two ethnic Chechen brothers who are suspected of carrying out the attack. Jim Hughes looks at whether or not the Boston bombings can be explained via Grozny. He argues that it is unlikely that the attacks are connected with the conflict […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

France is pursuing a new ‘abolitionism’ focused on removing prostitution from society without criminalising victims of the sex trade

European prostitution policies have traditionally ranged from acceptance and regulation, to outright abolition. Emily St.Denny writes on the evolution of French prostitution policy, noting that while France has articulated an abolitionist stance since the end of the Second World War, conceptions of what ‘abolition’ entails have varied significantly. She identifies a ‘neo-abolitionism’ that is now coming to shape French policies, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Margaret Thatcher’s fixation on national borders played a fundamental role in the making of the Schengen regime.

For nearly twenty years, the Schengen policy regime has guaranteed freedom of movement throughout much of the EU. Ruben Zaiotti reflects on former UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s opposition to Schengen: opposition which was based on a fixation on national borders and the apparent protection that they provide. He writes that in light of these criticisms, Schengen’s architects designed the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The EU should do more to engage with migrant diasporas to encourage development within and outside of Europe

There is growing recognition that migrants to Europe can act as agents of development for their countries of origin, and that this is something that should be encouraged through engagement with diaspora and migrant organisations. Using nine examples of good practice from across Europe, Nadja Schuster and Marlene Keusch argue for more coherence between migration and development policies. They write […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Support for EU membership in Croatia has fallen dramatically since accession negotiations began in 2003

This summer, Croatia is due to become the 28th member state of the European Union. But how do Croatians feel about EU membership? Renata Franc, Vanja Medjugorac and the project MYPLACE team report that support for EU membership in Croatia has fallen dramatically since accession negotiations began in 2003. They attribute this fall in support to the lack of public […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Real progress is now being made towards reform of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is one of the EU’s oldest and most important policy instruments, making up around 40 per cent of the EU budget. Wyn Grant writes that the most recent round of proposed reforms to the CAP focus on giving member states more scope to follow their own policies: making the policy less ‘common’. But, he writes, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The pursuit of integration requires that citizens have a sense of belonging to the whole, as well as to their own ‘little platoon’

Tariq Modood discusses the historical relationship between political multiculturalism and national identity, arguing that what some have construed as the ‘death’ of multiculturalism can better be understood as a change of focus. Any attempt to cultivate conditions conducive to integration necessitates that national identity be taken seriously, but in a manner which enlarges and pluralises conceptions of what it means to be […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Changing the way that referees are paid would be an important step towards preventing match fixing in European football.

Earlier this month Europol announced some preliminary results from a major investigation into match fixing in world football. In total, 380 matches played in Europe have been identified as suspicious, with 425 individuals suspected of involvement. Tito Boeri and Battista Severgnini write on recent experiences with match fixing in Italy. Their research indicates that most referees involved in illegal gambling […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Ageing Turkish migrants in European cities experience worrying levels of social isolation which can limit their access to health and social care services.

As Europe’s population ages, the substantial differences in access to health and social care services are becoming more and more apparent. Shereen Hussein looks at Turkish immigrants in London, finding that they often lack the English skills or knowledge about services and entitlements to access the care that they need as they age. More work is needed to tackle this […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Book Review: Fixing Drugs: The Politics of Drug Prohibition

In Fixing Drugs, Sue Pryce tackles the major issues surrounding drug policy. Why do governments persist with prohibition policies, despite their questionable inefficacy? Why are some drugs criminalized, and some not? And why does society care about drug use at all? In a highly polarized debate, in which emotions run high, Pryce attempts to illuminate these questions and guide us through […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share