Justice and home affairs (including immigration, asylum policies etc)

The trial of Anders Breivik shows that we need a better understanding of what drives right-wing extremist violence

Rachel Briggs and Matthew Goodwin explore some of the factors that drive individuals to adopt a right-wing extremist identity and maintain that more research needs to be conducted into why some engage in violent activities.  The trial of Anders Breivik – and its forthcoming conclusion – has sparked a resurgence of interest in one area of research that is often ignored by […]

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Preventing racism at Euro 2012 is not just the responsibility of Poland and the Ukraine. UEFA must take a harder line.

Hosted by Poland and the Ukraine, the lead up to the Euro 2012 football competition has been fraught with concerns about racism. Daniel Burdsey argues that the organising body, the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) must do more to show that it will not tolerate racism, both on and off the field. After a domestic Premier League season that […]

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The past twenty years have seen global regulatory leadership shift from the United States to the European Union.

For most of the post-war period, the US was the leader in comprehensive and innovative risk regulations. But the last two decades have seen the EU adopt far more stringent regulations than the US, meaning that every global firm must now take European standards and regulatory requirements into account in designing its products. David Vogel argues that this regulatory shift […]

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Fünf Minuten mit Hans-Christian Ströbele, Mitglied des Deutschen Bundestages: “Das Verbot des einvernehmlichen Beischlafs ist mit unter erwachsenen Verwandtener ist mit einer modernen Auffassung von Sexualität und Familie nicht vereinbar.“

Der European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) entschied kürzlich, dass die Bundesrepublik Deutschland den einvernehmlichen Beischlaf unter erwachsenen Verwandten weiterhin unter Strafe stellen darf. Ein 35-jähriger Deutscher, der eine Beziehung zu seiner Schwester unterhielt, hatte zuvor argumentiert, dass die Regelung sein Recht auf Privatsphäre einschränken würde. Im Gespräch mit den EUROPP-Redakteuren Chris Gilson und Julian Kirchherr erklärt Hans Christian Ströbele, […]

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The European Citizens’ Initiative is a significant move towards greater “participatory democracy” for Europe’s citizens, but there is still room for it to be improved.

The European Citizens’ Initiative (ECI) is a step towards the more direct involvement of citizens in European decision-making. However, Erminia Mazzoni, Member of the European Parliament, and Chairwoman of the Committee on Petitions of the European Parliament believes the ECI alone will not solve the European Union’s democratic deficit. She calls for a simplification of procedures and a lowering of […]

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The rise of secessionism in Catalonia has emerged out of the will to decide the region’s political destiny as a nation

Will Catalonia secede from Spain? Montserrat Guibernau explores why many Catalonians now hope that it might. She argues that Catalonia’s subsidization of less affluent regions, which leaves the region worse off, is a major root of discontent. With 23% unemployment (rising to 40% among young people), the deepening of the economic crisis is hitting Catalans hard. Resentment against the Spanish […]

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The EU must actively engage with Azerbaijan and hold it to its commitments. Otherwise it risks being a tacit supporter of an autocracy.

The EU is now trying to put democracy back into the heart of its foreign policy. Yet, the EU and its member states seem to have greater concern for their own energy interests than engaging with Azerbaijan’s near-autocratic regime. Jana Kobzova, Leila Alieva and Dan Kennedy call for the EU to pursue a “hug and hold” strategy with Azerbaijan –close […]

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Five minutes with Hans-Christian Ströbele, Member of the German Federal Parliament: “The ban on consensual sexual acts between adult siblings ought to be abolished.”

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ruled three weeks ago that Germany is entitled to ban consensual acts between adult siblings. A 35-year-old German man who maintained a relationship to his sister argued that the German legislation violated his rights to a private and family life. In an interview with EUROPP editors Chris Gilson and Julian Kirchherr, Hans Christian Ströbele, a […]

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Romania and Bulgaria have not been admitted to the Schengen Agreement because of the deep seated anxiety of the treaty’s current members about the regime’s future.

Where will the Schengen Agreement be ten years from now? Ruben Zaiotti explores why its signatories are currently hesitant to admit Romania and Bulgaria. He argues that in the wake of the financial and economic crisis the Romanian and Bulgarian governments can only hope that Schengen club’s chronic anxiety can be channelled against someone else. The European economic and financial […]

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Many countries in the European Union allow individuals to purchase citizenship. Such ‘investor citizenship’ is unfair and discriminatory.

Many countries in the European Union allow individuals to purchase citizenship. Jelena Dzankic explores the reasons why citizenship has become a commodity and discusses the implications of this trend. She argues that such ‘investor citizenship’ is unfair and discriminates against those who gain citizenship by more traditional means. Some states decide to naturalise people who donate money to them, or […]

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9 out of 10 European employers are no longer investing in training. Governments need to encourage them to invest in this area before Europe faces a massive skills deficit.

Throughout the Eurozone crisis, most commentators have focused on budget deficits and levels of public debt. But what about Europe’s skills deficit? Bob Hancké argues that investment in training across Europe has plummeted, and that governments must now intervene through tax breaks in order to kick start businesses’ investment in this area. He argues that a skilled workforce is often […]

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Higher education ministers must be more transparent in their discussions on transnational initiatives like the Bologna Process. The wider public need to hear about its problems – and its successes.

The decade long Bologna Process, which aims to make academic standards comparable across Europe, has remained relatively uninteresting to and uncommented on by the media and the European public. Anne Corbett argues that despite Bologna’s achievements, this lack of interest outside policy-making circles has led to gaps in the political process; gaps which lie in the lack of informed analysis […]

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The Bologna Process on higher education is an unpopular policy decided at the international level but outside the EU framework, circumventing transparent and democratic legislative processes.

While the EU’s institutions provide for relatively transparent and democratic legislative processes, these processes have been circumvented by the Bologna Process, which aims to make academic standards comparable across Europe, argues Sacha Garben. She also calls upon scholars, politicians, policy makers and the wider public to critically analyse the educational policy developments of the past decade which treat education as […]

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The revised EU’s Tobacco Products Directive seeks to ‘nudge’ citizens towards making better decisions about smoking whilst preserving individual choice.

In recent years, governments have been embracing policies that ‘nudge’ citizens into making decisions that are better for their own health and welfare, and the European Commission has embraced this ‘libertarian paternalism’ in its review of the Tobacco Products Directive. Alberto Alemanno explains that by introducing measures such as plain packaging and display bans, the European Union may be able […]

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The European Court of Justice is now little more than a rubber stamp for the EU. It should be replaced with better alternative arrangements for central judicial guidance.

Last Friday saw the ECJ taking on new roles as ‘enforcer’ of the new fiscal compact to limit budget deficits and debt across 25 EU member states. Damian Chalmers argues that the Court has grown too institutionally close to the EU to now be judicially effective. In order to check EU Institutions the ECJ could be replaced by a new […]

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The European Court of Justice has taken on huge new powers as ‘enforcer’ of the Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance. Yet its record as a judicial institution has been little scrutinised.

In the ongoing effort to solve the Eurozone crisis, 25 EU member states have signed a fiscal compact to limit budget deficits and debt. The European Court of Justice has taken on a new role to enforce these provisions by enacting severe penalties on non-compliant countries. Damian Chalmers argues that the Court’s record has been very little scrutinised. He argues […]

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The Conservatives cannot ‘wriggle’ their way out of the European Convention on Human Rights, even by introducing a British Bill of Rights.

The Conservatives have made no secret of the party’s desire to roll back its European human rights obligations, with many in the party also advocating repealing the Human Rights Act and establishing a British Bill of Rights. As the party seeks to ‘win back’ jurisdiction over human rights cases, Saladin Meckled-Garcia finds the coalition government’s stance is nothing less than […]

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