philosophy and political theory

Few have ever doubted the quality of Robert Dahl’s work

Robert Dahl, the foremost American political scientist of the post-war era, passed away earlier this month. Bill Kissane looks back at the central role he played in creating the discipline of political science in the United States after the war and his status as the pioneer of democratization studies. The American political scientist, Robert Dahl, died at the age of […]

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    Contrary to popular belief, traditional ideologies are not dead and continue to map the politics of the global age

Contrary to popular belief, traditional ideologies are not dead and continue to map the politics of the global age

A number of commentators and academics have argued that globalisation has undermined the relevance of traditional political ideologies. Rafal Soborski takes issue with this perspective, arguing that ideologies such as Marxism, liberalism and ecologism have managed to absorb globalisation within their conceptual structures. He also notes that ‘post-ideological’ perspectives may unintentionally benefit one particular ideology. By undermining the long-standing rivals […]

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The work of JS Mill shows the importance of a common identity to the principle of European federalism

The creation of a European federation raises a number of philosophical questions, both in terms of whether European federalism can be justified, and how a European federation could be constructed. Corrado Morricone writes on the work of the English philosopher John Stuart Mill. He notes that while Mill recognised the dangers in eliminating differences between European states, he would also […]

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The case for working less

Rather than ‘more work’, David Spencer argues that the pursuit of less work could provide a route to a better standard of life, including a better quality of work life. Reducing work time can be as much about realising the intrinsic rewards of work as reducing its burdensome qualities. It would also allow work to be shared more evenly across […]

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Money as a social construct and public good

In a new book, Ann Pettifor explores money and monetary systems, subjects which have been neglected for far too long by the academic profession. As long as we remain ignorant of how monetary systems operate, for so long will the public good that is money be captured to serve only the interests of the tiny, greedy minority in possession of […]

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The work of J.S. Mill shows the danger in eliminating the differences between European nations

Simon Glendinning writes on the English philosopher John Stuart Mill’s views on Europe. He notes that Mill saw Britain as being very much a part of Europe, but that he also recognised important differences between European nations. Far from seeing these differences as a weakness, however, Mill viewed them as part of Europe’s strength. While some academics have called for […]

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