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    How the European Union’s Court of Justice may end up having the last word over a hard Brexit

How the European Union’s Court of Justice may end up having the last word over a hard Brexit

If the UK fails to secure a Brexit deal with the EU by the end of this month, then it is obliged under the so-called Benn Act to request an extension to the process. But what if the government manages to bypass the Benn Act and take the country out of the EU without a deal? Robert Basedow explains that […]

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    Whatever happened to the Westminster Model? The ‘Italianisation’ of British politics

Whatever happened to the Westminster Model? The ‘Italianisation’ of British politics

The UK was once viewed by political scientists as embodying a distinct majoritarian form of politics – the ‘Westminster Model’ – that stood in contrast to the ‘consensus’ democracies found elsewhere in Europe. Several of the countries in the latter group, such as Italy, were often assumed to be inherently prone to instability in comparison to the UK. Yet […]

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Why is Poland’s Law and Justice party still so popular?

Poland’s ruling Law and Justice party has a lead in the polls ahead of the country’s parliamentary election on 13 October. Aleks Szczerbiak writes that despite intense domestic and international criticism, the party remains popular because it is trusted on the socio-economic issues that voters care most about.

Poland’s parliamentary election on 13 October is likely to be one of […]

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    Christine Lagarde is not a progressive choice for ECB president

Christine Lagarde is not a progressive choice for ECB president

Christine Lagarde, the former Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, is expected to take over from Mario Draghi as the next President of the European Central Bank. David Hollanders argues that although Lagarde has been viewed by some observers as a progressive choice, there is little reason to believe she will produce a meaningful shift in the ECB’s […]

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    Austria’s snap election: Kurz is back and so are the Greens

Austria’s snap election: Kurz is back and so are the Greens

Austria went to the polls on 29 September after a major political scandal led to the fall of the previous government. The centre-right ÖVP, led by Sebastian Kurz, won the election and further increased their vote share. Jakob-Moritz Eberl, Eva Zeglovits and Hubert Sickinger write that despite securing a clear victory, the election saw the ÖVP’s campaign engine stutter […]

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    Book Review: Social Mobility and its Enemies by Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin

Book Review: Social Mobility and its Enemies by Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin

In Social Mobility and its Enemies, Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin offer a thought-provoking assessment of the state of social mobility in Britain. In the context of much social and political change and rising levels of inequality in Britain, this book is able to dispel the myth of meritocracy and suggest evidence-informed avenues for achieving a fairer society for all, writes Ross Goldstone. 
Social Mobility and […]

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    EMU reform preferences: Is there a consensus between French and German MPs?

EMU reform preferences: Is there a consensus between French and German MPs?

Agreement between France and Germany is seen as a prerequisite for any substantial reform of Europe’s Economic and Monetary Union, but how feasible is it to find consensus positions between members of the French and German parliaments? Drawing on a new study, Sebastian Blesse, Pierre C. Boyer, Friedrich Heinemann, Eckhard Janeba and Anasuya Raj demonstrate that when it comes […]

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    How LGBT rights became a key battleground in Poland’s election

How LGBT rights became a key battleground in Poland’s election

LGBT rights have played a prominent role in the run-up to Poland’s election on 13 October. Lukasz Szulc writes that the ruling Law and Justice party has attempted to shore up its support by taking a harsh line on the issue, and while LGBT rights will probably not stay high on the party’s agenda after the election, it will […]

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    Bulgaria highlights the difficulties that lie ahead for Laura Kovesi as the EU’s chief prosecutor

Bulgaria highlights the difficulties that lie ahead for Laura Kovesi as the EU’s chief prosecutor

Laura Codruta Kovesi, the former chief prosecutor of Romania’s National Anticorruption Directorate, is expected to be approved as the new head of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office. Iveta Cherneva argues that the lack of media freedom in countries like Bulgaria will make it exceptionally difficult for Kovesi to uncover crimes involving EU funding.

When the news hit that Laura Kovesi […]

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    Why the radical right is no longer the exclusive domain of older, male voters

Why the radical right is no longer the exclusive domain of older, male voters

The typical radical right voter is often assumed to be older and male, with conservative views on women’s and LGBT rights. Drawing on a new study, Caroline Marie Lancaster writes that this assumption should now be reassessed. She finds evidence that there has been a particularly striking increase in the number of radical right voters who also support gender […]

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    Understanding the two faces of solidarity in the Eurozone and migration crises

Understanding the two faces of solidarity in the Eurozone and migration crises

The principle of ‘solidarity’ was a key feature of debates during the Eurozone crisis and the migration crisis, but the way in which the term was used differed in both cases. Drawing on a new study, Stefan Wallaschek explains that while the concept of solidarity is often assumed to be owned by actors on the left of the political […]

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    Book Review: The First Marx: A Philosophical Introduction by Douglas Burnham and Peter Lamb

Book Review: The First Marx: A Philosophical Introduction by Douglas Burnham and Peter Lamb

In The First Marx: A Philosophical Introduction, Douglas Burnham and Peter Lamb bring together Marx’s early writings in order to shape them into a distinct political philosophy. This is a diligently and rigorously researched work, writes Tarique Niazi, that will serve as a must-have primer for both early and advanced students and scholars of Marx.
The First Marx: A Philosophical Introduction. Douglas Burnham and Peter Lamb. Bloomsbury. […]

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    Can the liberals become the new pivotal political family of EU politics?

Can the liberals become the new pivotal political family of EU politics?

Ursula von der Leyen recently unveiled her proposed candidates for the next European Commission. Angelos Chryssogelos explains that one of the less observed features of the list was the empowerment of liberal politicians, continuing a trend toward a stronger liberal presence in EU decision-making. However, for the liberals to take on a central role in EU politics, they will need […]

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    The David Cameron memoirs: No apology, no atonement, no courage

The David Cameron memoirs: No apology, no atonement, no courage

In a new book, David Cameron details his time as UK Prime Minister and his reaction to losing the country’s referendum on EU membership. George Kassimeris writes that future historians are unlikely to be any kinder to Cameron than today’s political commentators, and his unwillingness to offer an apology for the turbulence that followed the referendum will do little […]

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    Is the EU headed for a ‘Southern Irish’ backstop in the case of a hard Brexit?

Is the EU headed for a ‘Southern Irish’ backstop in the case of a hard Brexit?

Some members of the UK government have hinted that the country may unilaterally refrain from introducing controls at the border with the Republic of Ireland in the case of a hard Brexit. Robert Basedow explains that if this were to occur, it would constitute a serious challenge for the EU and its single market. Customs authorities on the continent […]

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    Why trust in EU civil protection depends on trust in national institutions

Why trust in EU civil protection depends on trust in national institutions

A number of high profile crises and disasters have spurred the EU to expand its role in the field of civil protection. But little is known about whether national civil protection officials trust the EU institutions they work with and what the determinants of their views are. Drawing on a new study, Thomas Persson, Charles F. Parker and Sten […]

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    The ‘Brahmin left’ vs the ‘Merchant right’: A comment on Thomas Piketty’s new book

The ‘Brahmin left’ vs the ‘Merchant right’: A comment on Thomas Piketty’s new book

In a section of his latest book, Thomas Piketty attempts to chart how political competition has evolved in contemporary societies. Jan Rovny writes that although many of Piketty’s conclusions are not entirely original, they touch on important shifts that have taken place in recent decades. Among the most important is the reversing role of education in political alignment: while […]

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How ‘family-friendly’ are European countries?

Which European countries offer the most support to families? Yekaterina Chzhen, Anna Gromada and Gwyther Rees write that when all factors are considered, the Nordic countries, with their strong public spheres, are more supportive than those which elevate the family as a private institution.

Bringing up children can be seen as the sole responsibility of families or as a role […]

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    Book Review: Eric Drummond and his Legacies: The League of Nations and the Beginnings of Global Governance by David Macfadyen et al

Book Review: Eric Drummond and his Legacies: The League of Nations and the Beginnings of Global Governance by David Macfadyen et al

In Eric Drummond and his Legacies: The League of Nations and the Beginnings of Global Governance, David Macfadyen et al show how the emergence of an international bureaucracy of civil servants and their role in the development of the League of Nations rested on Eric Drummond and the early internationalists around him. This book provides a much-needed historical and biographical perspective on the […]

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    A sputtering car goes into reverse: The German recession and its consequences

A sputtering car goes into reverse: The German recession and its consequences

Heiner Flassbeck and Patrick Kaczmarczyk write that amidst global political and economic fragility, the downturn in the Germany economy adds to the uncertainty in a world that, as Paul Krugman put it, has a “Germany problem”. It not only raises questions and doubts over the future of the largest European economy but, more importantly, over the future of the […]

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