Hungary

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    The rise of Jobbik poses a credible threat to Fidesz’s dominance in Hungary

The rise of Jobbik poses a credible threat to Fidesz’s dominance in Hungary

Fidesz has been the dominant party in Hungary in recent years and secured a ‘supermajority’ of two-thirds of MPs in the Hungarian parliamentary elections in 2014. However, as Andrea L. P. Pirro writes, the party’s position has come under threat of late, with a by-election loss earlier in the year removing the supermajority, while another by-election on 12 April […]

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    With Fidesz opposing Juncker’s candidacy for Commission President, it is time for the European People’s Party to reconsider its support for Viktor Orbán

With Fidesz opposing Juncker’s candidacy for Commission President, it is time for the European People’s Party to reconsider its support for Viktor Orbán

Viktor Orbán’s Fidesz party retained a comfortable majority in Hungary’s parliament in national elections in April and received more than 50 per cent of the Hungarian vote in the European Parliament elections in May. Johannes Wachs writes that while Fidesz has received criticism from a number of actors within the EU, including the European Commission, the European People’s Party […]

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    Corruption in Hungary remains a serious problem, with EU funds being particularly vulnerable

Corruption in Hungary remains a serious problem, with EU funds being particularly vulnerable

Hungary held elections on 6 April, with incumbent Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s Fidesz party retaining its ‘supermajority’ in the Hungarian parliament. Johannes Wachs writes that one of the key challenges facing Hungary in the aftermath of the elections is the issue of corruption, with recent studies indicating that the country faces a greater corruption problem than other states in […]

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April 24th, 2014|Johannes Wachs|0 Comments|
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    With the final votes counted, Fidesz has secured a ‘super-majority’ in Hungary, but it is questionable how fair the election really was

With the final votes counted, Fidesz has secured a ‘super-majority’ in Hungary, but it is questionable how fair the election really was

Hungary held elections on 6 April, with the ruling Fidesz party winning a clear majority of seats. While there was initially some doubt over whether Fidesz had secured the ‘super-majority’ in parliament needed to amend the country’s constitution, the final results announced on 12 April indicated that it had met this target. Agnes Batory writes that although the parliamentary […]

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    Fidesz have won a clear victory in Hungary’s elections, but their supermajority hangs in the balance

Fidesz have won a clear victory in Hungary’s elections, but their supermajority hangs in the balance

Hungary held parliamentary elections on Sunday. As Erin Marie Saltman writes, Viktor Orbán’s ruling Fidesz party came out comfortably ahead in the vote and will maintain its majority in the next parliament. However with the votes still being counted, there is still some doubt over whether Fidesz will have the ‘supermajority’ required to alter the country’s constitution. Regardless of […]

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    Hungary’s reaction to the Ukraine crisis illustrates the tensions within Fidesz’s foreign policy discourse ahead of April’s elections

Hungary’s reaction to the Ukraine crisis illustrates the tensions within Fidesz’s foreign policy discourse ahead of April’s elections

Hungarian Parliamentary elections are scheduled for 6 April. As Johannes Wachs and Lise Herman write, the Crimea crisis has inevitably formed part of the backdrop to the campaign, with over 100,000 Hungarians currently living in Ukraine. They note that the current government, led by Viktor Orbán’s Fidesz party, has been slow to criticise Russia, in line with its ‘eastward […]

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Fidesz continues to dominate Hungarian politics ahead of the country’s 2014 elections

Hungary is due to hold elections in spring 2014. Erin Marie Saltman writes on the current state of play ahead of the elections, where the ruling Fidesz party will be seeking to maintain control over the country’s government. She notes that recent polls put Fidesz comfortably ahead of its nearest rivals, and that the fragmented nature of the opposition within […]

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The EU’s standoff with Hungary shows that there is little agreement on how European institutions can intervene in the policies of national governments

Since the 2010 election of the Fidesz government in Hungary, the EU has become concerned about its increasingly aggressive nationalist turn, including major changes to the constitution, media, judiciary, and education system, write Erin Marie Saltman and Lise Herman. As leaders in Hungary’s government protest about the EU’s ‘colonisation’ of Hungary, Europe’s leaders disagree on whether or not the country […]

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Brussels blog round-up for 29 June – 5 July: Croatia joins the EU, trouble in Portugal and France’s ‘restive left’.

Chris Gilson takes a look at the week in Brussels blogging.  The EU centre and the crisis  On Monday, the Portuguese Finance Minister, Vitor Gaspar, resigned, to the surprise of many – though Open Europe says that the recent signals showing his resignation was imminent had been fairly plain. Lost in EUrope says that the resignation is part of the eurozone’s […]

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Despite strong support for Fidesz among decided voters, most Hungarians are increasingly disillusioned about politics and politicians.

Erin Marie Saltman writes that opposition forces remain divided in Hungary, as Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s Fidesz government continues initiatives to solidify changes to the constitution, media laws and voting constituencies. In Hungary March 15th is a day resonating in political legacy. Spawned in remembrance of the 1848 revolution, Hungary’s iconic poet revolutionary Sándor Petőfi stood on the steps of the NationalMuseum […]

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Until relations between citizens and states improve in individual nations, it is unlikely that we will see a decline in Euroscepticism

With each passing month of crisis, the transnational solidarity on which the European project depends looks ever more unstable. Domonkos Sik uses Hungary as a case study to argue that attitudes towards the European Union are shaped by the degree of trust which characterises relations between citizens and the state at a national level.   It increasingly seems as if the prolonged […]

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Unless the fractured opposition left can unite, the political hegemony of the right will continue in Hungary.

In Hungary, political opinion has polarised, with Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and the Fidesz party enjoying considerable support as they continue to attack the EU. Erin Marie Saltman writes that only time will tell if Hungary’s divided left opposition will be able to put aside their differences and unite to overpower the radical right. Those less intimate with Hungarian political […]

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The anti-democratic tendencies now prominent in some parts of Eastern Europe may soon become an even bigger headache for the EU than the Eurozone crisis.

Twelve countries have joined the EU since 2004, with Croatia’s accession expected in 2013. Tamas Dezso Czigler argues that while the Eurozone’s economic problems are currently dominating attention, the EU is also facing a growing crisis in the new accession countries, with a number of Eastern European states exhibiting anti-democratic tendencies. The article warns that problems in Eastern Europe also […]

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Five minutes with Paul Sum on the political situation in Romania: “Romanians not only lack confidence in their governing institutions, many hold disdain for them.”

On Sunday, Romanian President Traian Basescu narrowly survived an impeachment referendum after voter turnout fell below 50 per cent, the level required for the vote to be valid. In an interview with EUROPP editors Stuart A Brown and Chris Gilson, Paul Sum of the University of North Dakota details the factors behind the political crisis, assesses the EU’s role in […]

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Hungary is sleepwalking into an authoritarian state. But the European Union is limited in the pressure it is able to exert.

Hungary is a member of the European Union (EU), but the country is sleepwalking into an authoritarian state, argue Tamas Dezso Czigler and Izolda Takacs. In their third post on Hungary’s government, they explore measures that the EU could take in order to sanction the country, some which may be more effective than others. In our last two posts, we […]

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With the ruling party’s legislative tsunami, Hungary may now be sleepwalking into an authoritarian state.

Hungary is a member of the European Union, but the country is sleepwalking into an authoritarian state, argue Tamas Dezso Czigler and Izolda Takacs. In their second of three articles for EUROPP, they argue that the new governing coalition has overhauled the country’s electoral and judicial system, violated the independence of the Hungarian central bank and invaded citizens’ private lives. […]

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Hungary is now a distorted democracy

Has Hungary become an authoritarian state? In their first of three articles on the Hungarian government, Tamas Dezso Czigler and Izolda Takacs argue that the country has become a distorted democracy on the brink of autocracy. Worryingly, the vast majority of Hungarians do not seem to be alarmed by these developments. Hungary underwent a major power change in 2010: The […]

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In Hungary Viktor Orban adds the EU to his lengthening list of ‘enemies of the state’

Hungarian Prime Minister, Viktor Orban recently denounced the EU’s policies towards Hungary as ‘colonialism’, after the EU suspended nearly half a billion Euro in funding over its massive budget deficit. Abby Innes takes a close look at Hungary’s recent decline from a country known for its reform policies to one which is now mired in economic crisis and increasingly extreme […]

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Romania’s recent protests have become a social movement calling for the dignity of the people in the face of an unaccountable government.

While originally sparked by the government’s plan to partially privatize the health-care system, Clara Volintiru argues that the recent protests and demonstrations in Romania are ultimately not only about the reform of social security systems and austerity measures, but also have the aim of achieving greater government transparency and accountability.   Remus Prata lives in the small village of Baia de […]

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