gender

The violent cartographies of violence- the imaginative rape geography of Congo

A few years ago if you’d asked me about Congo I wouldn’t have known very much about it. I knew where it was located on the world map… the geographical world map. As for the social, political, cultural, economical world map, I didn’t quite know where to place it. My interest in violence against women around the world, however, brought […]

Women in ‘combat’: a revolution in the US military?

On the 24th January 2013, Chairman of the Joints Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta signed a directive which will open up ‘front-line combat’ posts in the US military to women. While this move puts the US military on similar terms to militaries in Germany, Australia and Canada (among others), the British forces continue to officially […]

February 21st, 2013|Politics, Society|0 Comments|

Special US Election Blog Blitz

Here’s a round-up of posts related to US politics and gender that have appeared on Engenderings in the past year to get you geared up. Happy voting!

Amanda Conroy ( @amanda_conroy )  has opinions on on Republicans, Julian Assange and how we understand rape.

Be wary of the notion of the “Year of the Woman”, says Kimi Killen.

Linnea Sandstrom Lange doesn’t shy away from […]

November 6th, 2012|Politics, Society|0 Comments|

Radical Feminist Conference 2012 – Radically Limited?

In this post, Sarah Burton explores the radical feminist stance of the RadFem 2012 conference organizers in relation to the term ‘women born women living as women’. She considers if indeed it is possible to neatly and clearly delineate the word ‘woman’ and argues that binary and static notions of identity categories obscures the real, tangible ways in which ordinary […]

France, Hollande and the Future of Gender Equality

Sophie Drouet is a masters candidate in the MSc in Gender, Policy and Inequalities programme at the LSE and was a politics student at Sciences Po Lille.  She explores the potential meanings of the election of Francois Hollande in France for gender equality, particularly for women in France.   François Hollande, who defeated the incumbent President Nicolas Sarkozy by a […]

Gender Folding and Pre-teen Kissing

Are ‘homonormative’ narratives, full of labels for identities, becoming as rigid as heteronormative narratives? Maitrayee Basu questions the need for naming relations and argues that the fluidity of desires and identities leads to a better expression of self. This article has been published collaboratively by LSE Equality and Diversity and LSE Engenderings blogs to mark LGBT History Month.

 

I kissed a […]

February 29th, 2012|Society|0 Comments|

Now You See Her, Now You Don’t: U.S. Women and the Current Battle Over Contraception

In this post, LSE MSc Gender, Media, and Culture student Kimberly Killen reviews the current debate over contraception in the U.S.A. and asks, ‘Where are the women?” Something funny is happening in the USA. In the past few months, and especially the last couple of weeks, women’s health issues have re-emerged in the political realm with renewed passion and vitriol. However, […]

February 17th, 2012|Politics|3 Comments|

The Pains of Rendering The Iron Lady ‘Palatable’

  In this post, LSE MSc Gender, Media, & Culture student Kimberly Killen explores her reaction to the film The Iron Lady. She looks at how the film portrays a woman in power and the problems that arise therein.   Let me get this out of the way: Meryl Streep is great in the film The Iron Lady. That’s not […]

One Gay Day: Heteronormativity in Action

Emma Spruce, a PhD student at the Gender Institute, writes a witty critique of how heteronormativity functions in everyday interactions and how labeling from outside and within the LGBTQI community inhibits identity formation, recognition, and social change. This article has been published collaboratively with LSE Equality and Diversity and LSE Engenderings Blog to mark LGBT History Month. I let the […]

February 5th, 2012|Politics, Society|0 Comments|

Alasia Nuti Reviews Birgit Schippers’ Julia Kristeva and Feminist Thought

Alasia Nuti, an MSc student at the Gender Institute, reviews Birgit Schipper’s new book on Julia Kristeva and feminist philosophy. Ultimately, the most valuable part of the Schipper’s book is that it does what feminism does best: applying ideas in unexplored and unconventional contexts and being original in its dismantlement of reality.   “O Kristeva, Kristeva, wherefore art thou not feminist?” […]

January 31st, 2012|Politics, Society|0 Comments|

Bad Behavior has blocked 175 access attempts in the last 7 days.